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Well, one might think that with components like primers being so hard to come by, reloading presses might just be sitting on the shelf, and maybe sellers might offer a discount to move them, but on the other hand, even though components aren't out there, a lot of people might be buying presses and getting ready for when components can be found, so prices and supply of presses probably haven't changed much. If you want a new press, I'd say get one. I have always been a budget reloader, and my Lee Load All gets the job done.
 

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Just do it. I made a wholesale change of loaders last year going to Spolar. Prices had held me up for some time. Finally went for it and happy I did. Life is short. Try to enjoy it if you can do it.
 

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I think it would be in your best interest to wait and see what happens to the new prices of reloading components. The prices might end up being more than the cost of new shells? The reloading market could just dry up as well?

You also have to remember that, even though you pull the handle only once per shell. The force needed is 6 times as hard pull that handle, compared to your single stage press!!! I see lots of retired shooters move back to the easier to use single stage presses around here. Auto-mates and hydro machines are expensive, take lots of time to set-up and can't be moved after you do!!!

I expect to see many shooters stop shooting in the next year or two!!! So it would make sense that we will see lots of used reloaders for sale here in the for sale section as they retire from shooting. By then you will know the cost of reloading components and could get a nice deal on a lightly used reloader? I hope I gave you something to think about. Since their are no new reloaders to buy right now. The price of used ones are selling for to much, to be a good buy right now. I would wait and see myself. Good Luck to Ya. don't forget to break em all Jeff
Not sure where you get some of your information. Pulling the handle on a progressive is six times as hard as a single stage ? I don’t think so. The mechanical advantage is basically the same to precrimp amd crimp the shell on either. There isn’t much resistance at all in the other stages.

Secondly, you said “once set up you can’t move the progressive with an automate.” Granted I don’t pick one up with two fingers of my right hand, but I move it as I need to. Taking the reloader off the auto mate isn’t difficult.

I have MEC 9000’s mounted on an automate and one not. I load all four gauges (actually five). I prefer the 9000 without the automate for some hulls - 28 ga and .410 for example. For 12 ga where I load a much greater volume I use the automate. Quite, frankly, had I not gotten a fantastic deal on four MEC 9000 reloaders and the automate I wouldnt have purchased the auto mate. I don’t think the auto mate is faster. Actually, quite the contrary. If I have a foul up using the auto mate it takes much longer to clear it.
 

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Yep. With a manual pull, I find I can "feel" most foul ups before the bar has started to move, therefore easy to fix. The real weakness is in the primer drop. If you are looking somewhere else and you don't notice a primer drop failure, the next pull gives you a powder mess to clean up. I have set my primer to drop just after reaching the bottom of the downstroke, so that I can hear the primer sliding down while nothing else is going on. Still gotta watch it fall into the hole or, you guessed it, powder mess on the next pull.

I wont knock the automate or hydraulic users. While I am still able to manually pull the handle, I will enjoy the feedback I get. If the day comes I can not do that, I will probably mechanize it rather than quit reloading.
 

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This thread leads me to a question: with the shortage of components, why is there a wait time for new reloaders? Seems like people would be reloading less and there would be a surplus of reloaders ready to ship. For instance, all of the MEC reloaders state that "Due to high demand the (whatever reloader) will have a 2 to 3 week processing time." Sounds like the same is true for other brands.
 

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This thread leads me to a question: with the shortage of components, why is there a wait time for new reloaders? Seems like people would be reloading less and there would be a surplus of reloaders ready to ship. For instance, all of the MEC reloaders state that "Due to high demand the (whatever reloader) will have a 2 to 3 week processing time." Sounds like the same is true for other brands.
A lot of shooters who are not reloaders are having a difficult time finding shells (as we all are) and immediately think "well, I'll just load my own". Not being reloaders they are not aware that components are as difficult to find as loaded ammo. We see this same thing with pistol and rifle shooters as well.
 

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If you can afford it, Go for it.
Once you go from from single stage to progressive, you'll kick yourself for not doing it sooner.
 

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I’ve been doing fine with my MEC SizeMaster and it paid for itself awhile ago. However, pulling a handle 6 times for each shell and the inevitable occasional tip over of an uncrimped shell while moving it to another station is getting old.

I’m in the queue for a powered reloader and the price is locked in but Im’m wondering if buying this in the next few months is a waste of money. I would really like to have and use one. I have enough supplies to reload for awhile.

I'm concerned about getting components a couple years down the road, others who don’t reload getting shotgun shells and the clubs closing down because no one is showing up. Yes the clubs for people of greater means will do just fine I’m sure but I don’t go to those exclusively and they are often more pricey.

Next year it is predicted that the economy will take a “2008 Tailspin”. That would drive down the price of components and shells since less people would have jobs and fewer people of average means would be able to afford them or go to the clubs to shoot as well.

I don’t want to left with $1000’s of dollars of new reloading equipment and nothing to do with it in a couple years.

Buy new or just keep reloading with the old one?
I think they are in short supply right now for much of the same reasons that factory ammo and components are - people are stocking up and HOARDING !

I'm waiting it out, a year maybe two from now there will be a glut.
As with many things it is cyclical.

Oh yeah, boats too - I think that will be 3 or 4 years though.
Vehicles ? Dunno, but I'm in no hurry to replace my little 34 MPG toy.
 

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Despite all the comments above, I reload to get the combination of components that function
well in my guns and on my shoulder. Price saving is a distant secondary benefit.
Smoke um all.
George
.
 

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It's a good time to buy a used reloader.

It's not a good time if you don't have components.

It may or may not be better in the near future depending on whether new ammo or components become available first. I'd bet ammo will be available sooner.
 

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It's a good time to buy a used reloader.

It's not a good time if you don't have components.

It may or may not be better in the near future depending on whether new ammo or components become available first. I'd bet ammo will be available sooner.
As a commercial reloader of pistol and rifle ammo, the information that we are getting from the component manufacturers is that they are all feeding their ammo production lines first. After that, the really large re-manufacturers are getting a lot of what becomes available. We almost always have 300,000 small pistol and small rifle primers on order from multiple suppliers. Last order that we received was 300,000 small rifle primers from Black Hills. That was in July. Down to about 30,000 which is less than 2 days loading, then we are out. Talked to them last week and they said that they haven't received any additional primers since our last order.

As has been said many times on this forum, most all of the producers of primers are also producers of factory ammunition. The manufacturers feed their on production lines first, then feed the secondary market who sell to reloaders. If you look on the shelves of your local gun shops, sporting goods store and big box retailers who sell ammo and their shelves are empty, you can rest assured that there are no components available to the small reloader.
 

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So, Lu, now that you've caused 3 pages worth of discussion on your topic, has anything that's been said changed your alleged mind? As I recall, you have the order in and are just waiting for production. The decision point seemed to be whether to cancel the order or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
So, Lu, now that you've caused 3 pages worth of discussion on your topic, has anything that's been said changed your alleged mind? As I recall, you have the order in and are just waiting for production. The decision point seemed to be whether to cancel the order or not.
All in for a Ponsness Warren 800 Plus with the electric drive, a bag full of powder bushings and a #6 (aka 1-1/8 oz shot bushing).
I'm 3 months into the queue and about 6 months to go before it ships.
It's going to be pretty awesome when it gets here.
I'm good with components for awhile and I can cherry pick the good stuff when it comes up.
 

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This thread leads me to a question: with the shortage of components, why is there a wait time for new reloaders? Seems like people would be reloading less and there would be a surplus of reloaders ready to ship. For instance, all of the MEC reloaders state that "Due to high demand the (whatever reloader) will have a 2 to 3 week processing time." Sounds like the same is true for other brands.
Yes, there is a shortage of some components, but if you reload, you are in the position that you can now solve your shortage with either shells or components, so your chances of finding one of two is better than one and only one. Besides, when reloaders say primers are hard to find, that doesn't mean 50 or a hundred that means a thousand or five thousand.. And that means 5 to 25 flats of shells..Kind of different from hitting the jackpot at Wally world and having them allow you to buy 2 or 3 boxes of shells at a time.
 

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I’ve been doing fine with my MEC SizeMaster and it paid for itself awhile ago. However, pulling a handle 6 times for each shell and the inevitable occasional tip over of an uncrimped shell while moving it to another station is getting old.

I’m in the queue for a powered reloader and the price is locked in but Im’m wondering if buying this in the next few months is a waste of money. I would really like to have and use one. I have enough supplies to reload for awhile.

I'm concerned about getting components a couple years down the road, others who don’t reload getting shotgun shells and the clubs closing down because no one is showing up. Yes the clubs for people of greater means will do just fine I’m sure but I don’t go to those exclusively and they are often more pricey.

Next year it is predicted that the economy will take a “2008 Tailspin”. That would drive down the price of components and shells since less people would have jobs and fewer people of average means would be able to afford them or go to the clubs to shoot as well.

I don’t want to left with $1000’s of dollars of new reloading equipment and nothing to do with it in a couple years.

Buy new or just keep reloading with the old one?
I have two MEC 9000 H's And love it (them) I can reload 25 shells just under 3 mins!
 

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All in for a Ponsness Warren 800 Plus with the electric drive, a bag full of powder bushings and a #6 (aka 1-1/8 oz shot bushing).
I'm 3 months into the queue and about 6 months to go before it ships.
It's going to be pretty awesome when it gets here.
I'm good with components for awhile and I can cherry pick the good stuff when it comes up.
I hope you have better luck with the PW than I did. Their Customer Service was great, However i got to know them on first name basis. Sold it for a boat anchor and have the MEC 9000H and it walks circles around it!
I would look for a used one at less money and waiting time. Still get parts and do it yourself. I just purchased another 9000H as he quit shooting and reloading. MEC had completely rebuilt it and sent it back to him and he just stored it. The compressor cost just over $1,000 alone should mine go out! Got the whole thing for $700
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
I hope you have better luck with the PW than I did. Their Customer Service was great, However i got to know them on first name basis. Sold it for a boat anchor and have the MEC 900H and it walks circles around it!
I would look for a used one at less money and waiting time. Still get parts and do it yourself. I just purchased another 9000H as he quit shooting and reloading. MEC had completely rebuilt it and sent it back to him and he just stored it. The compressor cost just over $1,000 alone should mine go out! Got the whole thing for $700
I don't have a concern about starting and keeping a new PW 800+ running. I had offers from a couple members for various older PW models that I politely declined. A new 800+ is the best machine available. I'll start a thread sometime with my notes comparing MEC w/Automate the Spolar with hydraulics and the Ponsness Warren with Autodrive.
 
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