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I think it would be in your best interest to wait and see what happens to the new prices of reloading components. The prices might end up being more than the cost of new shells? The reloading market could just dry up as well?

You also have to remember that, even though you pull the handle only once per shell. The force needed is 6 times as hard pull that handle, compared to your single stage press!!! I see lots of retired shooters move back to the easier to use single stage presses around here. Auto-mates and hydro machines are expensive, take lots of time to set-up and can't be moved after you do!!!

I expect to see many shooters stop shooting in the next year or two!!! So it would make sense that we will see lots of used reloaders for sale here in the for sale section as they retire from shooting. By then you will know the cost of reloading components and could get a nice deal on a lightly used reloader? I hope I gave you something to think about. Since their are no new reloaders to buy right now. The price of used ones are selling for to much, to be a good buy right now. I would wait and see myself. Good Luck to Ya. don't forget to break em all Jeff
I call BS on this. Many progressive loaders have longer operating handles and mechanical linkages that multiply the effort used in pulling the handle. It does not take 6-times the effort to operate a progressive loader as it does to operate a single stage.
 

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I call BS on this.
The Mec reloaders have a longer handle as well. Its still much more difficult to pull the handle down on 6 shells as compared to one at a time. While it may not be 6 times harder to pull, I'll wager 4 times as hard would be in the ballpark. I was trying to instill this on a loader who has never operated a progressive press before. Once you get older, or develop shoulder issues!!! It becomes more of a problem. While Electric and Hydraulic presses offer a solution to a shooters shoulder issues. It comes with a price. Its not only a monetary issue, It also has to do with room to set-up a loader that is permanent fixture in the home. While a Spolar press is much easier to operate than a Mec progressive press. It too comes with a price tag.

I have seen several shooting buddies of mine go back to a single stage press after they retired for a time. Their brain has a harder time working 6 shells at once, as well as their bodies. If I live long enough, I expect this will happen to me as well. break em all Jeff
 

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^^Not all reloaders are like the MEC. It does not use the multiple linkage and force multiplier systems of most of the others. If you limit this to MEC, then maybe you are right.
 

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Any cost savings have been priced out so you are left with 2 choices.

Keep reloading and load up on components when you can OR stop reloading and load up with pallets of factory ammo.

There is no way to determine when the next "hard times" is coming.
 

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I started reloading with a 600jr. A few presses latter I’m using an RCBS grand. Loading is a nice off-season past time. Buy a decent loader and enjoy it.
 

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I just bought a PW reloader to replace the one I that I sold 8 years ago. Get on the list for the one you want today and hang on to it.
 

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My Mec 9000 with Automate is easier to move it's fastened to automate not my bench It doesn't take long to set up
 

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I vote for buying it. New presses are fun and progressives makes many more shells in the same time.
 

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Buy it. Use it. Enjoy it. However, if you don't like reloading, then absolutely do not buy it.
 

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I’ve been doing fine with my MEC SizeMaster and it paid for itself awhile ago. However, pulling a handle 6 times for each shell and the inevitable occasional tip over of an uncrimped shell while moving it to another station is getting old.

I’m in the queue for a powered reloader and the price is locked in but Im’m wondering if buying this in the next few months is a waste of money. I would really like to have and use one. I have enough supplies to reload for awhile.

I'm concerned about getting components a couple years down the road, others who don’t reload getting shotgun shells and the clubs closing down because no one is showing up. Yes the clubs for people of greater means will do just fine I’m sure but I don’t go to those exclusively and they are often more pricey.

Next year it is predicted that the economy will take a “2008 Tailspin”. That would drive down the price of components and shells since less people would have jobs and fewer people of average means would be able to afford them or go to the clubs to shoot as well.

I don’t want to left with $1000’s of dollars of new reloading equipment and nothing to do with it in a couple years.

Buy new or just keep reloading with the old one?
Another way to look at it is that if things do get even tighter a couple years down the road, think how many more shells you could have loaded up and set back for the harder times with a faster loader. If you enjoy reloading, you'll enjoy a faster loader because it lets you do more. If you look on reloading as a chore necessary for you to shoot the amount you wish, you'll enjoy a faster loader because it lets you finish your chores quicker. No downside I can see! LOL!
 

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i say go ahead and put in an order. Both PW and Spolar are many many months out before they can deliver. might as well get on the waiting list. you can decide later if you still want it.
 

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Buy the progressive tool, but I'd wait on the power unit until you've mastered the use of the tool. Pulling once per shell gives you a new perspective... see how you like it before going all in...

My $0.02
 

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The only thing bad about buying a new reloader at this time is the idea of being on a wait list. Manufacturers seem to be having a hard time getting materials to build them, as well a laborers to put them together. I spoke with P/W the other day about a shell feeder. I was told that there is a list because they could not get the disks that put the shells down the tube. They just got a shipment in and they should start sending units out shortly.

Why do we buy anything? Because we feel we have a need for it. Just go look in your gun safe. If you can afford it and want it, get it. If you want it but can't afford it, don't get it. We all rationalize our wants. It is a personal thing. Just remember you can't take it with you when you die. Unless of course you are a Pharaoh.
 

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Go on the reloading cost calulator on this site. Punch in all your component costs. Then the price for factory ammo in your area, Then thecost of your loader and it will calculate how many rounds and boxes you need to load to pay for the loader.

Bite the bullet and get a progressive loader. On the MEC 9000 you can disconnect the auto advance easily until you get it dialed in and are comfortable loading with it.
 

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Shooting and reloading are a pursuit that we enjoy. Not all aspects of any such activity have a clear financial Return On Investment calculation you can run. Even with stable component and factory ammunition prices you can't count on what things will do some years down the road when the next Black Swan event occurs.

About the only thing in this pursuit you can count on is that if you invest in a quality piece of hardware it should retain a good percentage of the original amount invested. A well maintained quality gun or reloader that's not not abused should do so. Some might even increase in value as other prices go up due to inflation.

I thought about all of the above before I ordered a new Spolar. I'm as cheap as the day is long, so that was a hard thing for me to do but I have no regrets. I intend to keep reloading and breaking targets until I can't get to the line anymore. It's a long-game play on a quality tool that should fit the buy-once, cry-once model. Well, I do have ONE regret - I ordered the loader and waited 5 months for it. Set it up and banged out a flat of perfect target loads in 20 minutes using the manual handle. Most people would set up the hydraulics next, but I held back my pennies and didn't order the hydraulic package. Two days after receiving the loader I called Spolar and ordered the hydraulics. That's my regret - I should have done the entire deal at the get-go, but I kicked the sand and tried to get going by limiting the investment. The entire automated reloader will make things easy to run without getting tough on your shoulder as you age.

If you decide to go for it pick the one you can afford, swallow hard once and make the investment. I figure this life-time tool cost about the same as another Browning combo, and will likely get far more use than another gun in the safe.
 

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Another thing to consider the height of the loading bench. If loading with a powered machine you can use almost anything. However if loading on a manual machine chances are the bench is too high. Most common height for a work bench is 36 inches which is about 6 inches too high for most people unless you are taller than 6'6". Easy way to determine correct height for a loading bench is to measure the distance from your closed hand to the floor. The loader handle at the bottom of it's stroke should be just about the same, maybe + 1 or 2 inches above that. A simple test would be to stand on something equal to the difference measured. Less strain on your arms and shoulders. YMMV.
 

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i say go ahead and put in an order. Both PW and Spolar are many many months out before they can deliver. might as well get on the waiting list. you can decide later if you still want it.
beetledude is correct. Use the time waiting for the loader to arrive to accumulate components. Talk to your shooting friends and figure out a starting recipe that you have shot or is suggested to you and start working on the components needed. Nothing worse than having a loader with nothing to load on it.
 
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