Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We'll be teaching my daughter (10 yrs old; 85 lbs) to shoot trap over the next couple months. If you could come up with a mental checklist (3 or 4 items) for beginning shooters (particularly kids) to check off before calling for the bird each shot, what would they be? (Assume I've got gun fit and gun safety already handled...) Would like to keep it simple as she's starting out, and then build on things as she gets comfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,024 Posts
Correct hold point, correct sight picture, and good timing when shooting the targeet.
I would start her out on the skeet field shooting the low house from station #7. I would
have her use a sub guage gun that has little or no recoil. HMB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,737 Posts
Lock the trap on straight aways and stand on post 3. Explain to her where to look for the target coming out of the house (somewhere between post 2 and post 4) so she isn't looking in the wrong place to see the emerging target. Explain that she has to either shoot at the top edge if it is going up or bottom edge if it is coming down. Shoot where it is going, not where it is at. Have her point the gun at the center top edge of the house, for now. Don't expect her to shoot very many at one round, at her age and size, she will get tired very quickly. Praise, encouragement, fun will help her improve....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,997 Posts
Lean into the shot, don't lean back to balance the gun. Make sure you have established eye dominance.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
154 Posts
I have always taught feet, knees, guns set. Everything starts at the ground and works up, get them into a comfortable foot position to help absorb the recoil, they need to have some flex in the knees. Next hardest thing with smaller kids is fit of the gun and mount. Because of the weight they lean back and then the face gets farther back on the stock. If you can get them to mount the gun into the pocket with the barrel tipped up at 45 and face on the stock, bending forward at the waist you have the basics started. If the recoil starts to hurt stop shooting......
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
7,410 Posts
very young shooters can not absorb nor comprehend all what you dump on them-- one and maybe two points is all they need at first!! slow the targets down and yes going to the low skeet house is a good way to start
my daughter started at 10 1/2yrs & would shoot at 3-5 straight a ways- we slowed the targets and set them a lil high
all we did was work at face placement -looking down the barrel &NOT looking at the bead
I've never seen a beginner shooter not curve their back when starting out
of all the youth I've started- I'd say 7 out of 10 say they are looking down the barrel-- which is really not the case!! heck most cant even see over the back of the receiver--in fact they are looking down the side of the barrel-- while closing one eye!!!!
goodluck and make sure its fun!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
I’ve worked with kids for a number of years and have some definite opinions on this one....
For a child this young and small, gun fit and recoil are your biggest issues. Find one of those single shot “Partner” guns in 20ga. Length of pull should about 12 1/2” if you find one of the smaller ones. Perfect for that age. They don’t cost much. Light enough and short enough for them to mount properly. I also put on a cheek eez pad for my son...raised the comb and if he lifted his head a bit it didn’t rap him too hard. They made a few of those in 28ga...you’ve struck gold if you can find one.

Then....shoot light reloads. When my son was that age I doctored up some 5/8 oz. loads then moved into 3/4 oz....20ga. A Lee Load-All is perfect for this but you can get it done with your MEC. Use corn for filler since you won’t find 5/8 oz wads.

Then....the hardest concept for kids is not focusing on the bead. They’ve been shooting BB guns and 22’s all their lives...now we tell them not to look too hard at the sights! Put a 3 ft dowel in the ground and put an empty shell box on it. Have here shoulder the gun and focus on the box. Once she’s hit the box a few times she’ll understand the idea of seeing the sights in the peripheral vision.

As for shooting. The advice above about station 7 on the skeet field is really good. SET THEM UP FOR SUCCESS. Skeet 7 is the very best place to shoot your first targets at a gun club. Better yet find a old foot Outers thrower and go have fun away from anything formal. Just break birds and laugh together. It doesn’t sound like part of the “trap instruction process” but it is.

When you go to the trap range. Shoot station 3 and set the house up for straight-aways. You’re still using 3/4 oz...maybe 8 1/2 shot. Move her around to the various stations if she wants to but keep the house locked on straights.

Hope this helps....lots of ways to skin this cat so you’ll get lots of suggestions. The first part is most important. Recoil and gun fit. The little ones get beat to death by factory 20ga loads and even the youth guns are too long (and heavy) for most kids that age/ size. This needs to be fun....being there with Daddy will only take her so far.

Trail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
We'll be teaching my daughter (10 yrs old; 85 lbs) to shoot trap over the next couple months. If you could come up with a mental checklist (3 or 4 items) for beginning shooters (particularly kids) to check off before calling for the bird each shot, what would they be? (Assume I've got gun fit and gun safety already handled...) Would like to keep it simple as she's starting out, and then build on things as she gets comfortable.
Sorry...I got off on a tangent and didn’t really answer the exact question you asked! Soft focus on a spot. Pick a leaf, branch, patch of grass away from the bead. Forces the eye to pick up the target rather than looking at the bead.

Trail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the feedback -- very helpful! My goal is to keep it simple, fun, and painless, so I've got some good material to work with now. As far as the shotgun, I've got an 1100 Trap that I'm adding a youth stock and 26" barrel to, that I think will work well with 7/8 oz loads. Proper fit and mount is a priority -- I've got an adjustable cheek piece and add-on rib, so with some mixing, matching, and dry fire practice think I can set the gun up to fit her very well. (I also picked up one of Terry's wall charts earlier this spring with this in mind. It's helped my shooting, and will get a lot more use helping her to get comfortable.) Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,997 Posts
Keep lessons short. I'd be surprised, at 85 lbs, if she will be able to hold up a 12 gauge 1100 for very long, unless she is really athletic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,730 Posts
Foot position, hold point, look point and how to look, and follow through.

Feet. How the body swings determines foot position. Left handers swing left away from the face and right handers swing right away from the face so the feet must be placed so the gun is pulled into the face for the shot, wind a right handed shooter back toward the house on 4 and 5 and a left handed shooter back on 1 and 2 . Some say point the belt buckle toward where you want to break the hardest targets ( right angles from 4-5 and left angles on 1-2 ).

Hold point follows from the above foot positioning. Whizzer White has a hold/look point chart for right handed shooters here;

http://www.swsupply.com/downloads/GunHoldsEdited.pdf

Look point is established but the new shooter needs to know that just mounting the gun and looking in some general area isn't all there is to the look aspect. His/her eyes must come to rest and attain a focal point in the look area before calling for the target. Hesitate until the eyes have settled in and are stable before calling.

Follow through is NOT an exaggerated swing. It is keeping the eyes and the gun ON the target until the eyes see the target break. Once the target breaks then it is OK to dismount the gun.

DT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
Eye dominance?
Make sure you know how to check it and then be sure she is not fighting an off hand eye that is telling her the clay is over "Here!"
1100 is a great starter w a 7\8 load. But I don't see many 85 lb ladies that can hold one up at the beginning. Its heavy and you are fighting that causing the, "lean back" to hold up the gun. Get a vest with a gel pad. Girls and Boys like the extra cushion.
All advice given on a fixed slow target is right on. Kids don't need all the talking and extra info many adults like.
If the eye dom. and hand are same----think both eyes on the Clay, Point front finger at clay, Pull trigger when finger meets clay. Do your part by making sure the choke is open enough to insure a hit, "Skeet" and 9 shot is not a bad word for this.
Have fun at all cost. IF the first four or five trips are 6 to 8 shots and fun you will be winning. Three years from now you will be having a great time together if you go slow early. If at any time the fun is low, do something else fun… You have a lot of time and growing ahead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Keep lessons short. I'd be surprised, at 85 lbs, if she will be able to hold up a 12 gauge 1100 for very long, unless she is really athletic.
Duly noted. My gut feeling is that she'll be OK in this respect once the youth stock is installed, but we'll go to a Plan B if it turns out too heavy/cumbersome. (She's been shooting archery for a couple years, she's a strong water skier, and her core and upper body strength in general isn't typical of a girl her age/size.) I do expect endurance to be an issue, but know if I keep shooting sessions short and fun that it will progress quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
As a youth trap coach I find the most important thing to teach the new shooter is this phrase...."focus hard on the leading edge of the target.'' We used to teach to focus hard on the target but found the phrase "leading edge" really helps since the target is moving.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top