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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Been shooting trap now for 20 years or so and I have a recurring problem that I can't seem to get a handle on.
I'm a very right handed right eyed shooter and any swing to the left is a considerably easier than anything to the right. To the point where to get a decent break on a right swinging shot my perceived lead looks like twice as far on a right going bird than a left.
I have tried turning my stance to favor the rights. Doesn't seem to help. I seem to be keeping my face tight to the stock but I must not be?
Any help or advice on this would be appreciated.

Thanks
Bill
 

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Go to the pattern board and make sure your shot is going straight to the POA. If your gun shoots slightly left of center you will break those lefts but be behind the rights. In one years time I had to make 3 distinct moves of my comb. As I shot I quit accommodating my gun with contortions and the shots came on a more 'instinctive' level. As that happened I would start shooting one or two targets less per 100, then maybe 3. Always one of the angles, and always the breaks became less and less smoky while the opposite angle was still inkballing. At that time I would hit the pattern board to check and sure enough, POI had moved away from POA.

Something to check.

Don T
 
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Have em lock the trap down so all you get are hard right birds and work it out. My guess is things will work them selves out if you can shoot enough of them. I had that same issue on 2 high when I started shooting skeet, I took a 5 gallon bucket and a puller and shot them till I got it right.
 
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Been shooting trap now for 20 years or so and I have a recurring problem that I can't seem to get a handle on.
I'm a very right handed right eyed shooter and any swing to the left is a considerably easier than anything to the right. To the point where to get a decent break on a right swinging shot my perceived lead looks like twice as far on a right going bird than a left.
I have tried turning my stance to favor the rights. Doesn't seem to help. I seem to be keeping my face tight to the stock but I must not be?
Any help or advice on this would be appreciated.

Thanks
Bill
I have the same problem with lead to right vs lead to left. I think, don't know for sure, but it just may be the way we perceive the target and the timing of swing. Maybe it is in the stance and swing? Not just one or the other?

It is way easier for me with a left swing than right (confidence is way higher when I see those breaking left) I just try and remember to lead the rights a tad more than the lefts, but that's probably not a good thing. But not all is bad, I just shot my first 25 today and I I noticed this a lot with quail hunting. Left is dead, right take flight..
 

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I had the very same problem. And as (flashmax) mentioned above, I hit the 13 yard pattern board and - sure enough - I was off to the left 1 3/4 inches at 13 yards or nearly 4 1/2 inches left at trap distance. That's enough to give you a headache on right angles. Do as he says, first. If that isn't the problem, maybe move further off the right corner of the trap house with your aim point (not eyes) and make an effort to get out ahead of the bird. You'd be surprised how far ahead you can get and still smash it. Good luck.
 

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Watch the D. Lee Braum video on youtube. An old production but one that shows the leads for the various shots and might give you confidence to shoot with the correct leads. Good luck.
 

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Bill, Do you shoot with just the Right eye open???
Have you been shooting the same gun long???

My first thought was that you are a two-eyed shooter and you are having a cross eye dominance issue!!! But if your left eye is covered or closed that would not be the case.

If its the later above that I would think your swinging the gun with your arms and coming out of it. In other words your face may be coming off the stock and your eye is moving to the side during the swing causing the double lead look for your site picture when you pull the trigger.
 

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Your experience as a long time right handed shooter is common to all right handed trapshooters. And the reverse is true for left handed trapshooters. It's easier (faster) for a right handed shooter to move his gun to the left than it is to the right - therefore, the perceived lead increases from about 1 to 1 1/2 feet for a hard left handed target from station 1 to 2 to 2 1/2 feet for a hard right from post 5. I'm assuming you are shooting with both eyes open and are moving your gun point from left to right as you move right from post to post and are shifting your foot position accordingly. Both of these things help. My suggestion for hold points will vary some from shooter to shooter, but they are as follows. On post one hold about half way between the left edge of the house and its center plus about 2 1/2 feet high±. On station two hold over the center of the house and about 2 1/2 feet or so high. On station three, move your hold point to mirror the one from post one - about half way between the right edge of the house and the center. On post four, hold pretty much over the right corner and on post five a couple of feet off of the corner. Foot positions will change from essentially square to the front line of the post one to square to the handicap line at post 5. I'm sure you will get other suggestions from other posters and the specifics can change from person to person, but these will be essentially correct - at least enough to get you on the right road to success and hopefully answer the questions your raise and others are probably wondering about. For the stations between one and five, the perceived leads in either direction are less than those the corners. Speaking for myself, targets moving left seldom needs a perceived lead greater than the left edge of the target or maybe a smidgen more except for the hard right on station one. Ditto going right except that on station four I give a hard right 1 1/2 feet±. I hope this helps. I didn't know D. Lee Braum had a video. If you find it, I certainly suggest you give it a good look. D. Lee was as good as they get at trap ( or skeet ) shooting. Without knowing, I think his advice with be in line with mine, except maybe the elevation to hold above the house. I use a high hold so I don't have to move the gun much.

Johnpe
 

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You have been shooting trap for 20 years? That can lead to both very good and some not so good issues. After many years of doing the same thing, we can get a little...ok...lazy. And you can get by with laziness for a while, but it will catch up with you. I don't know what is causing your lead perception issue, but I suspect you may be "arm swinging" the gun. That is an easy habit to fall prey to and if you are still able to break targets, there is little motivation to fix the problem.

Does this phenomenon occur at handicap distances as well?

Typically, technique flaws that may not produce misses at the 16 yard line will ruin your game at the 24+ yard line.

bluedsteel
 

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With all do respect and curiosity why after 20 years is it a problem that needs fixing? Its is going to be much much harder to un-learn a already bad habit..... ie bead checking.

The true point of the situation is getting the gun to hit where your looking.

My true advice would simply be find someone successful in shooting at you club and simply ask him/her to give you a look at your move-stance-hold. Start there first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You have been shooting trap for 20 years? That can lead to both very good and some not so good issues. After many years of doing the same thing, we can get a little...ok...lazy. And you can get by with laziness for a while, but it will catch up with you. I don't know what is causing your lead perception issue, but I suspect you may be "arm swinging" the gun. That is an easy habit to fall prey to and if you are still able to break targets, there is little motivation to fix the problem.

Does this phenomenon occur at handicap distances as well?

Typically, technique flaws that may not produce misses at the 16 yard line will ruin your game at the 24+ yard line.

bluedsteel
I'm starting to shoot some caps now and that has indeed magnified the lead difference.
Bill
 

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Nearly everyone has to use greater leads on right hand targets than left hand (for right hand shooters.) The reason is obvious: unless the gun is absolutely perpendicular to you body, it's positioned across your body so that the gun is tending to move more laterally on right hand targets and pivoting into your face creating greater lead on left hand targets. If you can visualize your body being an offset cam, it becomes clearer.
 

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I am in the same boat as you. I played trap for about 2 years and had issues on right targets on 4 and 5. I took a break from trap for about a year and played skeet. When I came back to trap that issue is more or less gone. I am able to track the bird a lot better, and I am a lot more comfortable with the shot.
 

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I tried to take note of what my perceptions lead was this past weekend. Making sure my lead was like the Jordan wall chart helped quite a bit; especially making sure that the right break aways were given proper lead. It really helped. I had a decent 94/100 (for me that's not too bad). My breaking lefts still to me seem like I don't give them as much lead, but I think it's due to swing speed and follow through being easier for the left vs the right breaks.
 
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