Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,620 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is there a logical reason why some indoor ranges won't allow shotgun patterning (birdshot)?

A 75ft indoor range just opened about 30 minutes from my house. All but useless for anything but handgun and rimfire, but I thought it may be useful for shotgun patterning/chronographing when the weather is crappy out.

Just saw their rules today, single projectile only, no birdshot or buckshot. But ANY caliber including 50 bmg.

I would assume 50 bmg would be more of an issue on an indoor range than my 410 with #9 shot.

My buddy owns a 100 yard indoor range, where the only restrictions are no AP or tracers, shotgun patterning is fine. Only problem is he's 4 hours away LOL.

Only really an asset for patterning during the winter months, guess I'll just have to wait until the weather breaks :)

I'm just thinking if this is SOP boilerplate for indoor ranges, without any real reason, if I can approach them with logical reasons why it ISN'T an issue, maybe they'll change their mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
I did a whole series of patterning at my local indoor range a few years back. Obviously I couldn't get to 40 yards, but if you read Dr. Jones publications and use Shotgun Insight, you can extract the exact information you need.

It was very efficient using the electric target hangars. I prepared the paper targets at home before I left and just mowed thru the stack while at the range. After a few hours I had a whole bunch of patterns. Once home I photograped the paper targets and used Shotgun Insight to analyze the patterns. I think this saves a good amount of time and gives more consistent results to patterning outside in the elements. After three trips to the range I had 150+ patterns to analyze and confirm my results. Good stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,330 Posts
I've shot at ranges that will allow shotguns and at ranges that don't, regardless of shell type.

Based on that, I can only conclude that it's a decision by the owner/operator.

If I were you, my curiosity would force me to ask. Tell the owner about your buddy's range and then ask.

Gene in Illinois
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
Likewise for the two above. But I do know that after a couple boxes at different yardages and chokes, you can see where you've smacked the target hangar several times. So I can see where it would be hard on the equipment.

HJH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
It is good etiquette to avoid shooting the target hangars or lines! I made 40”x40” paper targets and taped them low enough to avoid any stray pellets from hitting the hangar. That setup is obviously going to be dependent on the individual range.

You would be smart to use tight chokes and experiment at shorter ranges first…to ensure you are putting all of your pellets on the paper and not “spraying and praying.”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,790 Posts
At an indoor range not far from my location, there is an indoor range that uses thick rubber mats as back stops. A friend of mine wanted to try out the Taurus Judge he just bought so I tagged along.

He couldn't shoot the gun because he only had the self defense ammo with the copper disks and buck shot.

We were told by the operator that the rubber matting would not absorb the small shot and they could bounce back at us or hit another shooter.

I would say that the same principle applies to all multiple projectile weapons.

Its a liability issue. BYG
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top