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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Developed bad floaters after cataract surgery/refractive implants in both eyes. Had this condition for almost a year now. Recent visit to eye doctor now has referred me to retinal specialist/surgeon for a consultation who does this procedure where the actual vitreous fluid (floaters) is removed. Would appreciate any facts if you've had this done or know of a friend who has. I need to understand the good, bad or ugly.
 

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Scary procedure. Only a handful of surgeons in this country do the procedure. I have the floaters real bad, too, along with other eye issues. Three Ophthalmologists who have worked on my eyes all say that they didn't recommend that procedure - saying that if it was all that safe and effective they would ALL be doing it. You'd be wise to continue to investigate it and see if it's something you'd like to risk.
 

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I have decided to have it done to my right eye- I have one "chunk" of vitreous gel in the way and when it is in the wrong spot I miss when it should have hit. I have no control of this chunk and when it goes bad it stays bad. The later in the shoot or number of events in the day seem to make it worse
The surgeon told me the risk was about the same as cataract surgery. He recommended waiting long enough to make sure the body wasn't going to absorb it on its own, which mine will probably not as it has not changed size in almost a year.
 

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I think the ones that don't recommend it do not understand how negative the impact is on shooting. If I did not shoot trap I would not be having it done but, after last summer I can tell you that not hitting targets when you should is no fun. If I cant hit the ones I should there is no sense in shooting.
 

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Just had this procedure performed last week, I have a hole in my retina and vison in left eye was real bad.
The procedure it self was not too bad, and was outpatient.
The Dr knocks you out while he numbs your eye, then you wake up and he performs the surgery, takes about 1 hour.
Next day wasthe worst as it felt like i had 5 lbs of sand in the eye, but only lasted 1 day.
Part of the surgery was to put a gas bubble in the eye to put pressure on the retina, and close the hole.

Now the bad part for me is that i have to keep my head down, and look at the floor for 7 days to keek bubble in contact with retina! This really sucks!!! I have 2 more days to go and i am done.
Vision is very blurry as i am looking through a gas bubble. Bubble goes away with time and hopefully vision restored.
Success rate is 98% according to DR.
I had no other alternate, surjury or loose vision in left eye
Have appt this wed. to check progress we will see!!

Good Luck!!

JIM
 

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I think the ones that don't recommend it do not understand how negative the impact is on shooting. If I did not shoot trap I would not be having it done but, after last summer I can tell you that not hitting targets when you should is no fun. If I cant hit the ones I should there is no sense in shooting.
What does this say then, about the importance of clear vision, and locking on the targets with very sharp, intense focus.

I would think that this would be the reason why all other non invasive solutions should be looked at first. Once irreparable damage is done, that pretty much puts your best trapshooting days behind you. Obviously, if the possibility of surgery corrects your current vision problems, it would have to be weighed in the process, but only after time for the body to correct itself would be allowed to happen. It becomes a risk for reward type decision.
 

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There was a mishap during my cataract surgery. The iris was torn and some vitreous leaked out. The surgeon "replaced" the vitreous with plain saline - and quite a few bubbles. I could easily detect the bubbles as bright spheres that seemed to regularly fall (they were actually floating upward but appeared inversed). That was in 1977 and the bubbles were eventually reabsorbed - took several years. The bubbles are gone, but floaters are still common. Eye doctors have told me to learn to live with them and for the most part I do okay with everyday activities and even handguns. Not trap shooting, though.

In addition to the distraction of floaters, the off-eye (the one with the floaters) frequently takes over just before pulling the trigger. Beginning this summer I now shoot 100% one-eye and things are better. Not good. Just better.

The brain works exceptionally fast and the slightest distraction - floater - will cause a "flinch".

Of course, this might all be a crock of bull, but it seems valid - and it helps me continue enjoying the game even though I struggle. If nothing else, it's a good escuse for averages in the 80s.
 

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I had my floaters removed by Dr. Suhail Alam MD, he is part of the group of eye specialist at Barnet-Dulaney-Perkins.
This company is located in AZ at various locations, check the web -http://www.goodeyes.com.
They have done many of the trap shooters visiting as snowbirds. Operation took about 30 mintes, recover time four hours.
Vision next day was great, broke 99 three days later. One could not ask for a better group of doctors.
Joe Miller
 

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I'm not sure why a floater would cause you to miss a target. I have a problem with the retina in my right (dominant) eye that has made me partially blind in that eye. I still have enough vision in that eye to see distorted and broken images. My good left eye is the one that sees the target clearly. With both eyes open, my vision seems normal, I don't see the distorted images. Strangely enough, the damaged right eye is still my dominant eye and I continue to shoot right handed. I have no problem seeing the target - especially the ones that don't break. So, if you a shoot with both eyes and the floater is only in one eye, don't you see the target with the other eye like I do?
 

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My eye surgeon removed cataracts from both eyes and did perfect job. About 18 months after that surgery I developed floaters and discussed having them removed. He said to try to ignore them because any surgery has risks. He also said that if they became a real problem that affected my shooting they could be removed. He mentioned that it has become fairly routine to remove them and that professional athletes are their most frequent patients.

Jeff
 

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From what I hear, it's kind of like the guy making home-beer in his basement; nobody knows exactly how it's going to turn out.....
M.D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
From what I hear, it's kind of like the guy making home-beer in his basement; nobody knows exactly how it's going to turn out.....
M.D.
From the thread initiator: I was not looking for advice from "hear say" category. As far as a not widely accepted eye surgery procedure by all of the medical community- not too many years ago cataract removal, refractive lens implants and lasik surgery were all new procedures. By the way 44 years ago I was a kidney donor for a transplant for my father. He had no other options. The procedure was only the second performed at a major metropolitan hospital. He lived a full and normal life for another 10 years and passed away from other health issues. Now a days this type of organ transplant is almost commonplace as getting your oil and filter changed in your vehicle, the trick is getting a good organ match.
 

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So doing implants does not fix floaters? I have floaters and am considering implants. I'd like to hear from shooters with implants.
 

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Just got back from a vist to the eye DR, and the hole in my retina has closed up! So my vision wille be restoed and in my case the operation was well worth it. He estimates that my vision should return to 20/30 from 20/100 .
 

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I had the operation done. I was told that in my case the vitreous shrinks with age and at some point should detach from the macula. In cases where it does not, it may pull a hole in the macula which it did. The solution was to repair the hole. This involved a CO2 bubble and having to operate with my head down for three weeks in my case. When I left the retinalogist, he told me my vision might be correctable so I could drive. I was left with a distorted area in the center of my vision that persists and is not likely at this point to go away. However, my correction did not change appreciably. About a year later I developed a cataract related to the CO2 bubble. The ophthalmologist did cataract surgery and when I went home I was able to read the closed caption through a hole in the eye guard and my vision was nearly 20/20 from 20/40 uncorrected. I continued to shoot bunker through all of this and kind of like dickgtax my scores remained as they were before the problem, 22 avg. at 65, and bragging shot a 105 + 21 final at the state shoot at 70. So no complaints.
Good luck with it.
 

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The eye doctor I saw regarding this told me they don't do the bubble routine anymore. They use two very small needles that leave very small self repairing holes. Procedure takes 30-40 minutes and they advise you wear a patch over the eye for two or three days. Vision should return to whatever you had previously within hours. Vitrectomy can speed the progression if cataracts but if you've already had cataract surgery you're a perfect candidate for the new procedure. Eye surgery progresses at a fast pace so what you heard or thought last year is probably outdated this year.
 
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