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Discussion Starter #1
Nearly 50 years ago, the 1st Cav. began their air assualts, and they were involved in one of the worst battles of the Vietnam war, in the Ia Drang valley. I would enjoy hearing from any pilots that flew slicks, guns, or grunts, that would like to share their experiences. Thanks!
 

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There you go - posting this drivel again. Don't know why you have to post this inane stuff that no one cares to read.


How's it feel ?

amboy49
 

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Amboy49, if you feel that the soldiers that died in the Ia Drang valley, and the events, are not significant, you Sir, are a moron.
 

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Dustoff.... I agree with your response to moron. la Drang was a couple years before my time, however I did meet a Huey pilot in Cripple Creek CO on a Harley Ride for the Vets Day. He was a very interesting fellow and toured all the Vet events pilling a trailer with a Huey on it. One hell of a battle and gave birth to Air Mobile. 1st Air Cav.

blade819, us Army 1966-1968
 

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Dustoff,
Most people that were there won't talk about, some things you would just like to forget, and those that will talk about it probably weren't there.

Tony Generose, In country '68-'69 / '71-'72
 

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I had the privilege of meeting and conversing with Hal Moore at the National Infantry Museum.
An interesting guy to say the least. For any of you who happen to be in the Columbus, Ga. area, the museum is well worth visiting.
 

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Dustoff,

You can KMA. I spent 13 months and 12 days in Southeast Asia in 1970-1971 working the tunnels around Cu Chi. Delta Co 3rd Bn 25th Infantry Div.

If you'd like to tell me how much time you spent there we can share stories. If you are unable to do that then again . . . . . KMA.


amboy49
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I understand, and agree. It does seem, that as time passes, some vets are more comfortable about sharing their experiences.
 

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Here a few pics that my dad took while he was in Vietnam for his one tour. He was in artillery, I think 1965-1966 if memory serves correctly. He wasn't in the la drang valley, but they are still neat pics.

I had a bunch of his slides that he kept in a shoebox turned into digital pictures for a present a few years ago.





































 

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Click on website URL above.

CW5 (ret) Mike Lazares has published two books recently that you might be interested in: "Goodbye My Darling/ Hello Vietnam" and "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place".

Another great book is titled "To The Limit: An Air Cav Huey Pilot in Vietnam" by Tom Johnson. During the Vietnam War, one out of every eighteen helicopter pilots never made it home alive. At age nineteen, Tom Johnson flew in the thick of it, and lived to tell his harrowing tale.
 

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Dustoff: look DA it's not your topic people object to. It's you and your recent display of ignorance. So take a hike because if you can't give respect don't expect any.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #16
In 2007 Bruce Crandall finally received the Medal of Honor. After his military career, he toured and spoke with Vets from Iraq and other wars.

Retired Lt. Col. Bruce Crandall, 74, received the nation's highest military honor from President Bush in the White House East Room. The medal recognizes Crandall for his valor in repeatedly flying into enemy fire to bring in ammunition and supplies and evacuate the wounded.

Crandall completed 22 flights in a 14-hour period on Nov. 14, 1965, most under intense enemy fire. His actions in the Battle at Ia Drang Valley were depicted in the 2002 movie "We Were Soldiers," adapted from the book "We Were Soldiers Once ... And Young."

Bush, in his remarks, said Crandall had to fly three different helicopters over the course of the mission. Two were damaged so badly they could not stay in the air.

Yet Crandall and another pilot, Capt. Edward Freeman, "flew through a cloud of smoke and a wave of bullets," Bush said. They "kept flying until every wounded man had been evacuated and every need of the battalion had been met." Freeman was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2001.

"To the men of Ia Drang, the image of Major Crandall's helicopter coming to their rescue is one they will never forget," Bush said, adding that Crandall's battalion commander said that without Crandall, the unit almost surely would have been overrun.

‘They were my people down there’
Crandall, of Manchester, Wash., did not speak during the 15-minute ceremony, attended by more than 250 people. But Bush quoted from an interview in which Crandall offered his view of the mission:

"There was never a consideration that we would not go into those landing zones. They were my people down there, and they trusted in me to come and get them."

Crandall told The Associated Press that his unit had "minimum resources" and few administrators to handle the paperwork needed for the highest medals. He received the Distinguished Flying Cross, as well as a Distinguished Service Cross, before being nominated for a Medal of Honor.

This thread is simply an attempt to honor the brave men that fought and died in the Ia Drang valley. Their memory should not be forgotten.
 

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We should NEVER forget the Viet Nam War and those who fought and sacrificed. We as a nation learned many lessons, military, politically and socially. Now today, my Brothers are dying like those WWII Vets a decade ago. I belong to the Patriot Guard and get email notices daily, often 3 or 4 at a time, for either Flag Lines or rides. noknock1 thanks for the pictures. amboy49, thank you for your service but don't yell at Dustoff for keeping a horrific story alive. It's a piece of history that we should never forget.

blade819
Army 66-68
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Noknock1, Thanks for posting the photos. Yes, they were taken early in the war. Troops were still wearing the state side type of fatigues. M14's instead of M16's. Were most of these taken at a Firebase in the central highlands?
 
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