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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any info on re-pointing checkering on a gun stock ?

Like what kind of tool will I need and where I can buy it? along with any tips

for this job.

Thanks for your response.

Hal
 

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Frankly, it's not a job for the amateur to try, especially on a hi grade stock. Checkering is an art, and it takes a lot of practice to learn how. I've been building and checkering stocks for over 30 years now, and trust me, let a professional do the job for you if it's a valued gun. I would be happy to give you a quote on the work if you like. Just send a pm. If you just have a kick around gun and want to try it yourself, Brownell's sells a starter set of hand tools made by DemBart. You'll need a single line cutter, a reverse cutter, and good lighting. I also use a magnafying head set. Just remember, you must keep the cutter perfectly in the old groove of the checkering. As soon as you slip or cut across the head of a diamond, you're in deep trouble. Correcting a errant cut is very difficult to cover up and will stand out like a red headed step child if not fixed correctly. The reverse cutter is used to pull backwards from the border line to keep from running over.

Steve Fischer,
Fischer gunsmithing
 

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Steve speaketh the truth.....I've got the tools but wouldn't even think of putting them on the checkering on my ST-100 (which needs a repoint).

Ron Burr
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Steve,

Thanks for the comments and advise.

I would never try and learn on a "good" stock and I am aware that checkering is

an art. Just thought it might be something to work on.

I have several old stocks and forearms that the checkering has wore out, thought

I maybe practice on them.

Might come up with a new hobby?

Thanks

Hal
 

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You can do it. It's not brain surgery. You need to know how many lines per inch your stock is checkered and get the proper angled cutting tool. But it's tedious and requires concentration. It's easy to screw up like Steve Fischer describes. "Checkering is an art" but that's a far cry from re-pointing. Practice first!!!

On second thought, some people can't pour piss out of a boot.
 

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Re-pointing on most guns is a single cutter job - - - one line at a time. And make sure you get 60deg cutters to do it.

and, as they say, best of luck
 
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I agree Sepmerfi, but also agree with Steve.

Getting a dembart single cut checkering tool and an old throwaway stock is the right approach to learn the 'feel. Unless your eyes are exceptional you'll want magnification and great lighting - both overhead and offset.

My advise is to first play around with positioning the cutter in the groove to get the feel. Second, learn to start the first pass in each line with very light pressure and 'feel' the cutter in the groove.

Start the groove re-cut away from the border and stop short of the border at the other end.

Repeat until finished with all the lines in one direction. Start on the 'cross lines' and repeat the process, remembering to stop short of the border every time. At this time all the diamonds should stand out in the now unfinished grip but you have to finish the grooves at the border.

Walk away if you get tired or lose focus.

When all the grooves have been re-cut, finish the last 1/8 inch by placing the front of the cutter in the old groove at the border and pull back from the border into the recently cut part of the line - gently, lightly - repeat until finished.
At this stage you can add the pro touch and carefully inspect to see which diamonds need touch up to make them consistent and even - but you can't improve on the original job.

See if you can get a copy of Monte Kennedy's Checkering book, I think it is the best tutorial.

Good luck

Bill

Take your time
 

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Sorry to revive an old thread, but... There is some good information on this page and I have a question I'm sure some of you gentlemen have seen before.
I have a Remington 11-48 in 28 gauge. The wood is in good condition with the exception of a few scratches and a sprayed on coat of finish that fish eyed. I want to refinish the wood but retain the original checkering. Are any of you familiar with the flat top checkering and how to clean the lines just enough to define and then give a coat of tung oil?
 

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If it's old remington flat checkering first clean it good to remove built up oil and dirt use a very soft tooth brush and a good cleaning agent. Tooth paste can actually work really well for this then use denatured alcohol to remove the water. Dry it completely and then see if it really needs to be recut. If you feel it needs work get 2 single line finish cutters ( I prefer dembarts) 1 pull and 1 push and very gently clean out the lines. Don't over do it. Then seal with an oil like tung oil or linseed. Wipe it on work it in with a tooth brush and remove any excess with a lint free cloth
 

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If it's old remington flat checkering first clean it good to remove built up oil and dirt use a very soft tooth brush and a good cleaning agent. Tooth paste can actually work really well for this then use denatured alcohol to remove the water. Dry it completely and then see if it really needs to be recut. If you feel it needs work get 2 single line finish cutters ( I prefer dembarts) 1 pull and 1 push and very gently clean out the lines. Don't over do it. Then seal with an oil like tung oil or linseed. Wipe it on work it in with a tooth brush and remove any excess with a lint free cloth
Sounds like a plan!
Thank You!
I'll post a picture when I get it done.
 

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True flat-top checkering is cut with a 90 degree cutter, unlike pointed checkering (99% of all checkering) which is cut with a 60 degree cutter. Go to Brownells and buy a Gunline handle and Gunline PL-90F pointer cutter head.

Examine the cutter teeth very carefully and you'll see the teeth only cut in one direction. Install the cutter to cut on the PULL stroke. I've checkered for over 40 years and never cut on the push stroke....never.
 

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I vote send it to a pro unless you want to work for 50 cents an hour.
You work fast.

I'm reasonably handy-building electric guitars is a hobby. Checkering is something I would only attempt on a stock owned by someone who already hated me and who had moved permanently to the Middle East and was never returning.

And even then I'd have to be drunk.

Checkering is like playing like the violin. When done well, it is magnificent. When done poorly it is excruciating.
 

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Just started my checkering class this week! It’s incredibly tedious and frustrating lol. Going to be a minute before I scratch up the few stocks I’ve built.
 

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Anyone who says that they recut the checkering on a stock as an amateur, and did a perfect job, needs an appointment with the eye doctor.

I have done a few, and I can accept that I will never be doing checkering on a stock belonging to someone else.

I find that a long jointer tool and a miniature "vee" chisel are very useful tools in recutting checkering.

Professional level checkering is worth every penny on a stock of any substantial value.
 
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