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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I bought a new Beretta trap combo.
I shot 2 rounds of trap with it and while the recoil wasn’t all that bad, it still felt a bit harsh. I ordered a new Kick-ez pad for it.
when I removed the factory pad I noticed there was a lot of the wood removed from the insides of the stock.
So,
How much weight can one add before throwing the balance off?
Is this a trial and error type thing?
Thanks,
Jeff
 

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Trial and error for sure. I added weight to the stock of my guns for years.
I felt it made the guns move faster.
You can also add weight to the front of the gun to balance it out.
I never felt the need to do that. I usually added 6-8 ounces to the stock.

Some guys Shoot well with a heavy gun.

Its All Good

West
 

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I am not sure I answered your question.
It doesn't take much to change the balance for me 3-4 4 ounces is enough to notice. Again I like the faster feeling of a butt heavy gun.

Adding weight front and back will allow you to maintain the balance and reduce the recoil.

Its All Good
West
 

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I have added nearly a pound to a couple of my Mod.12s and all in the stock and not slightly noticed.
 

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It is personal preference im adding weight to the stock of my superpossed i added a counter coil the stock was pretty hollow out. I had to add a 7/8 dowel rod to screw the plate on to i drilled out the dowel and filled it with shot. I'm goin to add about 4oz more shot should balance it to were I like it. Add some try it add more try it take some out try it.
 

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The amount yo add to the stock will dwarf the amount added out front simply due to placement.

You are going to have to experiment with amounts and placements.

If get steel shot you can use a rare earth magnet to fill the cavities. The magnet will hold the shot together in the cavity temporarily to get the weight you need until you make the weight addition more permanent (lead or otherwise)
 

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Keystone Shooter
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I
I added weight to the stock of my Beretta 687 Silver Pigeon III Joel Etchen Special. It seemed a little barrel heavy. I used rolled up, and taped lead in the butt end. Worked fine.
 

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My rule of thumb has always been what ever the amount of weight I added to the stock I'd add the same amount to the forend.

Most of my guns weigh 8-9 pounds. I once shot a sbt shotgun that I was considering purchasing and the gun weighed almost 13 lbs. I shot one round and I felt like my sleeve length went from a 32 inch to a 38. The owner was recoil sensitive and felt he could no longer handle the weight.

I declined purchasing the gun but told him to shoot that gun successfully you would need forearms like a blacksmith.
Steve Balistreri
Wauwatosa Wisconsin
 

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jmayaa,
If you are going to shoot doubles, and you use a very light load for the first shot, you can add too much weight to the stock and the inertial trigger won't set for the second shot of the pair.

My stock is fairly heavy and I shoot a light first shot for doubles. When I added 3 oz the inertial trigger would not set for the second shot. For me 2 oz was perfect. Your mileage may vary.

Good Shooting
Gavin
 

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My friend who started me shooting claimed ideal was for a break open gun to balance on the hinge pin. I shoot a AH Fox Super Fox SxS with 32" barrels. It takes a lot of weight to balance that gun on the hinge pin. I got it and it works and shoots well for me.

PD
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you all for the advice and suggestions. I’ll start out with 8-12oz in the butt stock and see what that does.
 
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