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The last several times I have shot my first round is always the best.. I can usually shoot a 25.. maybe a 24 on the first round.. then the next 3 rounds i'll drop 2-3 each round.. we (my squad) dont usually stand around shooting the bull we get back out there on the line.. I dont like standing around and I dont like holding up other shooters.. we have shot behind some squads that seem to take forever to get their 100 in.. just wondering.. how long do you usually take in between rounds at a competition? thanks!
 

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At most larger Registered shoots those that milk their 100 are also the ones the make the event run longer than needed. I think 5 minutes between rounds is plenty long enough. If you can't get a drink, get a box of shells, dump your empties and shoot the bull in 5 minutes there is something wrong. That is one of my pet peeves waiting on a squad screewing off. That said i enjoy every second of every event. I'm not sure what the actual rule is.

Matt
 

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This is one reason that shooting registered events over four traps makes a smoother shoot. The timing of an event is determined by the targets flying.

As squad one finishes their first trap, the second squad is walking to the line to shoot. The first squad is not returning to the bench for shells, smokes, etc. When the second squad finishes the trap, it is a repeat. The second squad approaches the next trap, and takes the line as soon as it is available. If the first squad has taken a break, the second squad may get a short break also.

The shoot management must watch the line, and as the line begins to clear to turn events, they may request that a squad shoot another 25 on their earlier trap. This can assist the timing to make the turn.

If you want to get about 20% more shooters thru an event, use 10 per post, but be ready to have shooters choose to not shoot the event.

Doug Sims
 

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Come on guys; five minutes is a lifetime. Shoot the bull and drag your feet after the round. Just my opinion. Jerry Callaway
 

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5 minutes was used as max. Certainly it doesn't always need to take that long. Remember though, there are elderly shooters that do require a tad bit more time than some of us younger(40's) shooters. I respect my elders and don't get upset when waiting on someone just trying to enjoy life after giving society his years of labor.
Matt
 

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.

"I respect my elders and don't get upset when waiting on someone just trying to enjoy life after giving society his years of labor. Matt"

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Excellent point.

.
 

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If the next field is open, it doesn't take longer fro everyone to get prepped for the next round. 5 minutes would be on the outside, normally its about 2 minutes. Simple routine, clean lenses, get a cold drink of water, get a box of shells in the pouch, go to the line. Most guys don't want to hang around and let their mind start wandering anyway.

But there are those people that do want a significant break between rounds and for them the best bet is to squad with other like minded shooters and get on a late squad.
 

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Unfortunately that is why you need a squad hustler, line supervisor doing his or her job. If a squad is really slow someone needs to tell them to speed up or get off the line. A really slow squad has a rearward ripple effect and can really screw up a bank long after they have left the line. We followed a really slow squad at the grand, 15 minute break between houses, and by the time we got to the 4th house there was us and 3 other squads waiting to shoot. The line supervisor wouldn't tell them to speed up, and they were not old shooters either. I drove by later and every other bank had finished but that bank.

Look around and be courteous to your fellow shooters and get the lead out.

Don
 

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I think Doug Sim is right on target...Big shoots such as the Spring Grand are a real problem.

If a break is necessary I feel 3~5 min is quit enough.
 

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I think Doug Sim is right on target...Big shoots such as the Spring Grand are a real problem.

If a break is necessary I feel 3~5 min is quit enough.
 

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If you are lucky "speedo skeet" will not morph to "speedo trap". In "speedo skeet" the first shooter walks off the field while shooters 2, 3, 4, and 5 are still shooting their last last station. Shooter #1 carries some extra ammo and walks directly to station 1. Shooter #1 starts shooting station 1 while the rest of the squad gets their ammo. Shooter #1 is usually a braggart that bores the world with stories about how fast his squad shoots.
 

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You need enough time to get a new box of shells, and move to the next trap. There is no need to take longer than that. Depending on where you are, this could take more than 5 minutes. Most places I've seen don't take that long.
 

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Shooting targets, whether in practice or competition, is or should be fun. Those taking an inordinate amount of time between shots or events hold up others and that's not considered good sportsmanship in any game!! I've shot targets with DS and B25 enough to know the squad will move right along and nothing is as important as YOUR next target! We come to shoot a 100 target event, not to take naps between sub-events of 50 or 25s.

I once heard an old timer ask a young fellow if he came to shoot or dance? It took the young man a long time to make up his mind about calling out a target till the old man asked that question! Worked well for both, the young man pizzed and shooting lights out much quicker and the old man didn't have to stand longer watching him make up his mind! That teachers name was Howard Caster, manager of the old Mint T&S club.

Hap
 

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In military matches, the range officer times each prep time with a stop watch. If you are not ready in your 3 minute prep time, they pull you off the line and proceed with the rest of the relay. I got used to the smooth match operation. I am pretty easy to get along with, but it is pretty annoying when people are not cooperative. I have waited in the sun while some experienced shooter holds up the squad and the squads behind him because he left his shells in the car, after he stood around and talked for an hour. I do not care how many buckles you have or how many patches on your vest, don't hold up 75 guys behind you for no good reason. It usually always seems to be the same guys. I am proud of the past accomplishments of some of these guys, but don't stand in the way of others just because you can get away with it. Shoot or get off the roster. If someone is new or doesn't know better, I am more than glad to work with them. If someone is in failing health, I'll carry their lawn chair and sun umbrella and help them with their gear. I'll run and get water for those who the heat is affecting, but if a person is just self centered, I have no tolerance.
 

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My wife had the same problem you describe - great 1st trap, good 2nd trap, and by the 4th trap the wheels came off. We sovled this problem by going to very light loads. At first, 7/8 oz at 1200 fps worked well, her scores stayed within a bird all the way through. However, the 7/8 oz loads seemed to be more impacted by temperature. When the temperature dropped below 40, we would get random bloopers. I switched to 1 1/8 oz at 1090 fps, (mathmatically the same recoil as the 7/8 oz loads we had be using) but not nearly as sensitive to temperature. Both our scores went up.

Summarizing, minimizing recoil helps lots of shooters - no need to take more punishment than needed.

BobK
 
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