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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using the Terry Jordon wall chart which requires a lot of dry firing. Terry recommends using a snap cap and even sends a couple when you buy a chart. I have seen various threads about dry firing. Seems like some guns it is OK to dry fire without a snap cap and some guns not.

So I am curious, how can dry firing do damage? Why are some guns OK to dry fire and some not? Seems like the firing pin just doesn't hit anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If it doesn't hit anything what stops it from not flying out of the receiver? Perazzi have 2 piece firing pins
725 firing pins are stepped and pinned at the back. Only the smaller diameter front tip can come out through the hole. I could see that possibly the step could slam into the backside of the hole. Do some designs just use a single diameter pin that can come flying out?
 

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It can be model dependent. Reference the gun owner’s manual to see what it says. Centerfire firing pins like shotgun and 9mm etc can generally be dry fired on occasion without too much concern. If doing it constantly, like with the wall chart, it is better to use snap caps. Snap caps can’t hurt certainly.

Rimfire guns (.22) should generally not be dry fired.
 

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Some shotguns have floating firing pins and some have firing pins integral with the hammer. Firing pins are manufactured with a compromise between hardness and toughness, and some are not as good quality as others.
A primer or a snap cap cushions the deceleration of the firing pin.
Like the old jokes about failed parachutes, it's not the fall that does the damage, it's the sudden stop.
 

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I use a toothpaste size tube of clear silicone to make about 200 and have used them for over 40 years and no firing pin issues. I only use one for a couple weeks then I throw it away. The benefit you get from the eye brain finger timing outweighs any risk of a broken pin. I leave a bit of silicone sticking up ( about a 1/16 of an inch) like a primer not seated deep enough.
 

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I fail to see how a small drop of silicone adhesive/sealant can provide any measurable resistance to the firing pin. If the firing pin is going to be damaged from dry firing with an empty chamber then a little bit a silicone isn't going to prevent the same results.
 

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I use a toothpaste size tube of clear silicone to make about 200 and have used them for over 40 years and no firing pin issues. I only use one for a couple weeks then I throw it away. The benefit you get from the eye brain finger timing outweighs any risk of a broken pin. I leave a bit of silicone sticking up ( about a 1/16 of an inch) like a primer not seated deep enough.
Try the rubber from pencil erasers.
 

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Do some designs just use a single diameter pin that can come flying out?
Of course not. The issue is energy, normally the energy stored by the mainspring is delivered to the primer via the pin. Take away the primer and the energy has to go somewhere. It may in fact dissipate harmlessly into the receiver or it may cause a pin to fracture, pocket to crack, etc. It's more insurance against what could happen than preventing a sure thing.

Now, is cured rtv an effective snap cap? My guess is no, it just doesn't provide enough resistance. I've tried Delrin plugs, aluminum plugs using fires hulls etc and for the time money and trouble, I like fired hulls the best. I mostly just de-cock with them but have shot a few dry fire rounds.

-Scot
 
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