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Hi:
My older 366 will sometimes grab (especially when going fast) and roll the dropped primer to the right, jamming it under the shell plate. The primer pocket hole is evidently worn in excess to the right, enabling this.
Shell plate is as tight as it can be. Have not polished and waxed the plate bottom, but it may be worth a try.
A fill weld and drill/grind to spec would certainly be best fix, but I only have steel MIG.
I do not trust a JB Weld-type filler to remain in position.
Drilling an enlarged hole and placing an insert is most likely my solution, something I can make easily on my metal lathe.
Guess I could send it to Hornady. It could be updated. Is the older style with no shell drop hole or swing-out wad inserter, but does have auto-advance, and shut-offs.
Anyone else have this problem?
Any proven solutions?
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Just found another similar post from a few years back. It did not show up in my pre-post search. I apologize.
 

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Slow down on the upstroke and slightly hesitate when the primer is about to drop into the primer hole.

Once you "get" the rhythm it becomes second nature.

A fast upstroke is probably what causes this.

The primer pocket hole is designed with that "relief" on the right-hand side.
 

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That divot in the primer cup is there for a purpose and is not the cause of your problem. The most likely cause is a bent shell plate. Another cause might be that the plate is not tight enough.

To check for a bent shell plate, every time the primer gets caught under the shell plate, mark the tab with a sharpie to see if it's happening at the same shell plate tab. If it is, that is the tab that is bent.

The steel is pretty hard on those things so flattening it is tough; the best way to remedy the problem is to get a new shell plate.

And I agree with slowing down a bit on the upstroke.
 

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You can call and get a new part. For $50 plus shipping and parts Hornady will rebuild it back to new. I have done this with my 20 and 12 loaders.
 

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I agree with the above posts. SLOW DOWN on the upstroke. I usually watch to make sure a primer drops. A bent shell plate is another possibility. Take the shell plate off and put it upside down on a known flat surface like a kitchen counter top. You will see if it's bent. MIDWAY USA sells Hornady parts a little cheaper than Hornady.
 

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You need to develop a slow, smooth return stroke on the Hornady 366 to keep from trapping a primer. You can increase the relief on the side of the seating pocket to let you go a little faster. Otherwise get the gas assist.
 

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down load the 366 manual and read it so you get familiar with the machine and take your time and don't rush on the up stroke
 

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Guess I could send it to Hornady. It could be updated. Is the older style with no shell drop hole or swing-out wad inserter, but does have auto-advance, and shut-offs.
I'm thinking the only way to update a 366 with the characteristics you describe would be to replace the "platen," which is the casting between the base and the die head, and maybe the die head as well. The only two "updates" your 366 lack, are, as you state, the hole for the finished shell to drop through (along with the metal chute the directs the finished shell towards the back) and the swing-out wad guide. Hornady made changes to the platen casting in order to add those features. And I'm not sure about the die head but it may be they made a change to the die head to allow the rod the wad guide is attached to to move up through the die head. I'm not sure it makes economic sense to make these upgrades.
 

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I'm thinking the only way to update a 366 with the characteristics you describe would be to replace the "platen," which is the casting between the base and the die head, and maybe the die head as well. The only two "updates" your 366 lack, are, as you state, the hole for the finished shell to drop through (along with the metal chute the directs the finished shell towards the back) and the swing-out wad guide. Hornady made changes to the platen casting in order to add those features. And I'm not sure about the die head but it may be they made a change to the die head to allow the rod the wad guide is attached to to move up through the die head. I'm not sure it makes economic sense to make these upgrades.
They definitely made a hole for the wad guide rod just bought a new 366 6 months ago you are spot on.
 

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The older machines didn’t have the alignment pin to orient the relief on the side of the hole. If you have the older one make sure the relief is to the right of the round hole. As the machine wears it causes the spring to compress slightly crooked and it causes the primer hole relief to wander and walk around in a circle. A new spring solves this problem. Good luck!
 

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There is a great set of videos on YouTube where the guy refurbishes and upgrades 366 machines. He machines a slot into the primer seater base, and then drills the frame side casting for a set screw to extend into that slot just enough to keep the primer seater base from rotating. Very unique solution.
 

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Not sure what your problem is, but the little notch on the on the side of the primer seater is supposed to be there. Not sure about the old ones, but all three of mine have a pin soldered or glued to the side to keep it oriented. If the little pin is missing or loose it will allow the thing to turn the answer.and cause problems like you describe. As several others have said, developing a rythem and not going too fast on the upstroke is probably
 

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That notch in the primer seating cup is not there on the older machines. If you mill one in, which was a common modification, then you have to find a way to keep it positioned. When the factory added it to the design, it included the pin that keeps the notch properly oriented. Using a set screw coming in from side is a reasonable alternative solution to the problem.
 

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Happens to me periodically. Not a problem to manually reverse the plate a small amount and the primer drops right in. Just a reminder to be smooth and slow.
 

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I have a problem but not with the same station. My issue is the last station and shell drop. Finished shells just don't seem to want to exit the ride the same way. I have tried to adjust the paper-clip type spring. But, about a 1/3 of the shells make the rabbit hole, a 1/3 bypass it and flop to the front of the press and a 1/3 plop off the back side. I have developed a very deliberate slow upstroke to assure that the plate rotates and indexes properly.

Anyone have any suggestions? Thanks. Dave
 

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One thing to check with the primer problem is that the primer seating station bottom where the shell head sits is not above or below the metal of the base casting. If it is sticking up above the base casting by even a little, the primer could catch and/or the shell could catch on the other side when the shell base catches on the base casting if the primer seat is too low. You can adjust it by using an allen wrench to turn the screw where the primer sets to bring the station level to the casting. If you find that the seat will not come up high enough for the screw to tighten it to level with the base casting you may have to stretch the spring under the seat to make it a bit longer.

Remember to loosen the nut on the bottom of the screw before starting to make the adjustment and then tighten it when you have the height set correctly.
 

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I have a problem but not with the same station. My issue is the last station and shell drop. Finished shells just don't seem to want to exit the ride the same way. I have tried to adjust the paper-clip type spring. But, about a 1/3 of the shells make the rabbit hole, a 1/3 bypass it and flop to the front of the press and a 1/3 plop off the back side. I have developed a very deliberate slow upstroke to assure that the plate rotates and indexes properly.

Anyone have any suggestions? Thanks. Dave
I'm thinking you have a bent shell plate. One or more of the tabs are bent downwards and it's throwing the shell ejection off. Make a mark on the shell plate tabs when the shell drops properly to see if that happens on the same tabs every time. If it does, the other ones are bent. Either replace it or call Hornady to see if you can send it back and have it returned to factory specs.
 
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