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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came across a Hollwood Automatic Shotshell Reloader for sale recently and became intriqued by its design and heft. It seemed to be made entirely of steel or cast iron and must have weighed about a 100 lbs. This one was rusted badly but was stored indoors. Apparently these machines were sophisticated in their day capable of 1800 rounds an hour and very expensive. Any idea what these things are worth in today's market? I'm looking at it more as a curiosity piece than for real shotshell production. I don't want to offend or shortchange the owner with a low offer if it's worth more than I'm willing to pay.
 

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Ive never seen an automatic Hollywood press, Have owned the manual one years ago. Are you sure its automatic?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ive never seen an automatic Hollywood press, Have owned the manual one years ago. Are you sure its automatic?
Positive. It's mentioned in the 9th Edition of Reloaders Digest and elsewhere on the internet. Pretty amazing machine for its day.
 

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I'd have to see the 1800 rounds per hour to believe that one. That's loading 30 rounds every minute. In other words, I'm officially calling bullshit on that one.
 

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Calm down Matt. He is just talking about a reloader. I don't want you having a heart attack because I think you owe me a beer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I'd have to see the 1800 rounds per hour to believe that one. That's loading 30 rounds every minute. In other words, I'm officially calling bullshit on that one.
It was hard for me to grasp in the beginning too but if you read the Handloaders Digest 9th edition you'll see the same specification. There are plenty of other references to it online also if you care to do the research. Here's one reference ...
https://books.google.com/books?id=X...ollywood automatic shotshell reloader&f=false

But getting back to my original question for anyone knowing anything about this machine, what would be a reasonable price for one in the condition described at the top of this thread?
 

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good machines for their day but you had better be a machinist to own on now you can update it a paint it an it still is an antique loader and better used by the more advanced loader they didn;t give much trouble in their days and when parts were available even the bushings have to be made now. I have one in the basemant and have not even looked at in since the 60's. The value would be in the eye of the beholder I have seen a few here in Tenneessee at pawn shops and garage sales and they were pretty rusted up. Not a whole lot of value but fun to rebuild.

Mac
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
good machines for their day but you had better be a machinist to own on now you can update it a paint it an it still is an antique loader and better used by the more advanced loader they didn;t give much trouble in their days and when parts were available even the bushings have to be made now. I have one in the basemant and have not even looked at in since the 60's. The value would be in the eye of the beholder I have seen a few here in Tenneessee at pawn shops and garage sales and they were pretty rusted up. Not a whole lot of value but fun to rebuild.

Mac
Mac,
What are the pawn shops in your area asking for them? What value would you put on one? I couldn't agree more about the machine being best suited for an advanced loader or a machinist. It looks to be very complex. I wouldn't be interested in it for production but for bench art.
 

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I'd have to see the 1800 rounds per hour to believe that one. That's loading 30 rounds every minute. In other words, I'm officially calling bullshit on that one.
Maybe they meant 180 shells per hour. LOL. For 1800 1-1/8 oz shells per hour hour it would take 126 lbs of shot. 1800 shells is only 72 boxes of shells. LOL. It would take me close to 3 hours to put those 1800 shells into boxes.

It would be cool to see one of those old loaders.
 

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I have seen 3 in the last 8 years here and one Mec grabber that I bought for 29.00 and completely rebuilt
and sold. The Hollywooods I have seen were about the same but those people don't know the v alue of
products like that. You actually can take the loader apart one piece at a time and refurbish it. I wouldn't
try disassemblying the whole thing at once untill I got familiar with the loader. You can make it look like new but it just costs money. But in my case that is what I do and I enjoy it mostly for the conversation part. I saw 1 in a garage
sale a couple of years ago with a lot of Alcan powder and wads for sale but they wanted more that what it was worth in the shape it was like 100.00 but they never sold it. It was their grandfathers and had no idea it's value.

Mac
 

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Maybe they meant 180 shells per hour. LOL. For 1800 1-1/8 oz shells per hour hour it would take 126 lbs of shot. 1800 shells is only 72 boxes of shells. LOL. It would take me close to 3 hours to put those 1800 shells into boxes.

It would be cool to see one of those old loaders.
Do not forget the 1800 primers and hulls you must feed it. Also you would likely need well over 4 lbs of powder if using a standard load of the day of say 18 grains of Red Dot. Then you would most definately have to have a 100% problem free session throughout to come anywhere close to those figures. I would bet one would be lucky to achieve half that 1800 figure. I'm just trying to keep it real.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Do not forget the 1800 primers and hulls you must feed it. Also you would likely need well over 4 lbs of powder if using a standard load of the day of say 18 grains of Red Dot. Then you would most definately have to have a 100% problem free session throughout to come anywhere close to those figures. I would bet one would be lucky to achieve half that 1800 figure. I'm just trying to keep it real.
You're probably over thinking this. By comparison according to the same source a Dillon SL 900 has an average rounds per hour of 700-900 and the MEC 600 Jr, MarkIV of 200.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have seen 3 in the last 8 years here and one Mec grabber that I bought for 29.00 and completely rebuilt
and sold. The Hollywooods I have seen were about the same but those people don't know the v alue of
products like that. You actually can take the loader apart one piece at a time and refurbish it. I wouldn't
try disassemblying the whole thing at once untill I got familiar with the loader. You can make it look like new but it just costs money. But in my case that is what I do and I enjoy it mostly for the conversation part. I saw 1 in a garage
sale a couple of years ago with a lot of Alcan powder and wads for sale but they wanted more that what it was worth in the shape it was like 100.00 but they never sold it. It was their grandfathers and had no idea it's value.

Mac
So, would you think less than $100 is a fair market value for a rusted up version?
 

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You're probably over thinking this. By comparison according to the same source a Dillon SL 900 has an average rounds per hour of 700-900 and the MEC 600 Jr, MarkIV of 200.
No sir, I am thinking right. Let me be clear, I am not calling you a liar. I am discounting the sources who claim these over estimated totals. I did see where in fact they gave those numbers for rounds per hour. Just because it is printed, doesn't make it accurate. Your examples of the Dillon prove my point. That modern day loader which is one of the best on the market is capable of achieving its advertised RPH totals with its large capacity hoppers and hull feed. The old Hollywood, with small shot/powder tubes typical of the time, would be lucky to come anywhere close to the Dillon's production numbers which are roughly half of the Hollywoods claimed numbers. Someone along the line fudged numbers to look like a super loader it is not. I am sure it was a quality piece of equipment, especially for its time. It just wasn't all that it was claimed to be or it would still be made by someone.

Don't be taken back by my doubting beliefs and have yourself a great weekend.

PS: You could always buy the thing, get it restored and then make me eat crow by proving me wrong. It's happened before.
 
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Anyone have a picture of an old Hollywood?

If everything went perfect, you MIGHT approach a RATE of 1800 per hour for a few minutes but no way could you do 1800 in an hour. Not even with two guys working.
 

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Hey guys, it was advertised in the days when everything was "Model Perfect"!

They probably ran it for a few minutes and projected it out that- if -it ran for an hour it could make 1800 shells.
 

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Hey guys, it was advertised in the days when everything was "Model Perfect"!

They probably ran it for a few minutes and projected it out that- if -it ran for an hour it could make 1800 shells.
I just used the "Model Perfect" projection method and figured out that my wife and I can have sex about 80 times per hour.
 

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The reloader I had didn't use bushings, It had hand adjustable micro meter inserts that you set for powder/shot drop. primers were hand fed. Turret was turned manually It made a nice looking reload. Center shaft was about 3" solid steel..
 

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I definitely think 100.00 would be a fair price, the bushings are the piece the micrometer screws into and have to be made at a machine shop I had one made years ago and that whole machine was made by hand and machine shop
it would cost a fortune to make a machine like that today. no investment casting in that one . a lot of the old timers
will remember that loader if they reloaded back in the good old days. I inherited mine when I first started loading and never really got it to load fast, there was a lot of handwork to load a shell but it made some nice loads on the first AA's
that came out, remember trying to find the right crimper back then for it was a chore. seems like we ended up getting parts from Herters back in those days.

Mac
 
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