Hold my beer and...RUN! | Trap Shooters Forum
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Hold my beer and...RUN!

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by PatMiles, Jun 30, 2020.

  1. PatMiles

    PatMiles Well-Known Member

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  2. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Russians send their top agent to kill American troops in Afghanistan...
     
  3. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    I did not like this video because IMO it did not take throwing the practice device, or whatever it was, seriously. Grenades are not funny.

    During Army basic training in 1966 at Ft. Benning, we had Ranger drill sergeants and were taught with practice grenades that had the black powder increments from mortar rounds stuffed inside of the cast iron grenade body. A real detonator (fuse) and spoon (curved handle) were also used. In this way, a practice grenade was very realistic. When detonated, they made a loud report and gave off a lot of smoke and flame. We practiced air bursts and holding a grenade for 2-3 seconds before dropping it over a wall or throwing it into a window or open doorway.

    If you held a practice grenade too long, it would go off and burn your hand. A practice grenade so equipped was not to be taken lightly.

    During training with live grenades. We stood behind a shoulder high concrete wall. Each trainee was closely supervised by a drill sergeant. When the pin was pulled and the spoon released, the trainee was to immediately throw the grenade and duck behind the concrete wall. Out of 250 men in our basic training company, there were no dropped live grenades. Our drill sergeant told us that in every basic training company, a least one trainee drops a live grenade and the drill sergeant has to quickly pick it up and throw it over the wall. He told us of a few close calls where the trainee dropped a live grenade on a boot and the grenade rolled several feet before the drill sergeant could get to it and throw it over the wall.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
  4. flashmax

    flashmax Well-Known Member

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    Mortar increments are NOT black powder. Practice grenades ( blue body ) do NOT use a cap. They use delay increment only with a black powder report charge. But it isn’t from mortar delays.
     
  5. flashmax

    flashmax Well-Known Member

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    Grenade, Hand, Practice, Delay, M62
     
  6. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Flashmax:

    The increments that we used came in plastic tubes, about 1/4" in diameter and 1 1/2" - 2" in length. The drill sergeant called them mortar increments. The practice grenade had a smooth body, egg shaped to round, tapered on each end and open on each end. One end was threaded and you inserted the fuse, spoon and pin assembly into it. The increments may have contained some type of smokeless powder but our practice grenades made white smoke, flame and a loud bang. Somebody said that the increments were black powder. Smokeless powder would make a lot more sense. This was in March, 1966. Some of the ammo, especially for the .30-06 cal m1917 water cooled machine gun was made in the early 1950's. The M-14 7.62 ammo was, I think, reloaded ammo that was made in the early 1960's.
     
  7. flashmax

    flashmax Well-Known Member

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    I went through in ‘67. I also “specialized” in US and Foreign munitions in use by or available to the NVA/VC.

    Mortar increments for the 60 mm were wafers 1 1/2 inches square by 50 thousandths thick sewn together in stacks of 10 and sealed in transparent visqueen. Charge tables called for some number of whole increments plus half or quarter increments. These sheets looked like greasy discolored paper.

    The report charge WAS black powder. But it was NOT mortar increments.
     
    School Teacher thanked this.
  8. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Flashmax:

    Thanks for the diagram of the M62 practice grenade. That is the same practice grenade that we used. At the time, I probably had 4-5 weeks in the Army and was very, very sorry that I had enlisted. I was beyond total physical exhaustion.

    For some lucky reason, I could throw grenades well. We had a grenade throw on the physical proficiency test at the end of the 8 week basic training course and I got a perfect score. I was overweight when I enlisted but lost about 20 pounds in basic. I was barely able to run a mile in 8 minutes. I passed the physical proficiency test with a score of about 310 out of a possible 500 points. If you scored under 300 points you were sent back to the 5 week mark with another cycle. The grenade toss saved me from a recycle.

    During this period of my life, I was trying to survive each day. Our training at Ft. Benning was brutal with several trainees passing out during runs or long marches. A duce and a half followed our formations and trainees who fell out were dumped into the back of the truck. I never had to ride in the truck. During training, I managed to shoot high score with the M-14 for expert and did enough other good things to graduate 2nd out of about 250 men. I am still proud of this 50 plus years later. From basic, I went on to other training, became an E-5 buck sergeant and later a 2nd Lt. via Officer Candidate School. OCS was easy compared to basic training at Ft. Benning with Ranger drill sergeants. I finished 6 1/2 years in the Army as a captain in transportation.

    During OCS, we all sanded our helmet liners smooth and had a local auto shop spray paint them with transportation brick red paint with metal flake added to the paint. We then added decals and waxed the helmet liners to a high gloss. To complete OCS, we had to do another physical proficiency test which included a grenade throw. One OCS candidate was not good with the grenade throw and the our tactical officer put his helmet in the middle of the target circle of the grenade throw.

    The weather was near freezing and very windy. The tac officer dared him to hit his helmet, which was sitting atop a 1 foot high post in the center of the ring, as an added incentive. We were throwing from the prone position and the grenades traveled in a high are to the target circle which was about 15 yards away. The grenade throw was perfect and the grenade hit the helmet liner dead center. The impact knocked the helmet liner off of the post and about half of the metal flake transportation red paint came off in little shards. The shredded paint shimmered in the sunlight as it left the helmet. Everyone who saw it let out a loud cheer.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
    bluesasquatch thanked this.