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Heat Stress is a common topic within my line of work and my company world wide. This may affect those competing at the Grand American.

Heat stress includes;
  • Heavy sweating.
  • Headache.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Dizziness.
  • Light headedness.
  • Weakness.
  • Thirst
  • Confusion
  • Troublesome thought
  • Terrible scores
Resolution/prevention of Heat Stress;
  • Drink plenty of water, even if you are not thirsty. Beer is not hydration.
  • Seek shelter either shade or an air conditioned building/vehicle.
  • Maintain a proper diet, do not skip or substitute meals.
  • Use the FREE OSHA-NIOSHA heat index app to know what precautions too take, the APP I very useful for all aspects of life.
  • Remember a gallon of gas is cheaper than a funeral.
  • A gallon a day keeps the mortician away.
Basically it boils down to drink water and stay cool when you can. Heat Stroke is another story, if you can maintain proper prior hydration heat stroke will not occur. On the WSRC grounds they do have a hospitality tent and emergency services, use them when applicable.

Good luck everyone. Shoot good and bring home the iron.

If anyone has a heat stroke story it is a notable post.

Thanks,
Trapp2012
 

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Stay hydrated, drink plenty of fluids. As mild as it is here this year you shouldn't have any problems as long as you take the necessary precautions.
Fantastic weather for the midwest at this time of year, global warming in full effect.. lol Colonel
 

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In the 80’s but you can still get very tired quickly with a few hours of sun. Go shoot and walk the sporting clays courses and you will feel it, I did.
 

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I've heard it's best not to drink ice water vs cool water.
I've worked in on scene emergency response (ski patrol and ambulance) in a full time / volunteer status for 15 years. And every physician sponsor I've worked with has said that this is incorrect. They all said hydration is hydration, and that the claim that cold water is worse comes from an old paper showing that fluid uptake rates are depressed with cold. But in reality the body warms it up quickly and people drink more cold water than warm when they are hot.

So moral of the story is if cold water sounds better than warm, pig out!
 

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Hydration starts the day before.
At least one day before, serious athletes begin on Wed, if not sooner.
If you're hydrated, drinking water keeps you hydrated. If you are not, then it's too late, you can't play catch up by starting to drink water the day of an event.
 

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I've worked in on scene emergency response (ski patrol and ambulance) in a full time / volunteer status for 15 years. And every physician sponsor I've worked with has said that this is incorrect. They all said hydration is hydration, and that the claim that cold water is worse comes from an old paper showing that fluid uptake rates are depressed with cold. But in reality the body warms it up quickly and people drink more cold water than warm when they are hot.

So moral of the story is if cold water sounds better than warm, pig out!
What he might be referring to is for some people when they are really hot drinking ice water, I mean really really cold, can cause stomach spasms and vomiting.
 

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When I passed out from heat stroke in the Army, my first sergeant, an RN, gave me lukewarm (tepid would be a better word....) water with a little salt in it, at first, then as I felt better told me to keep drinking water until I had to pee, then drink some more. She kept a separate canteen on her belt with the salt water , had the Red cross symbol on it so she didn't drink it accidentally.
 

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New to the forum but wanted to add to this post.
Hydration is only a part of the answer to stopping heat stress and then heat stroke. Hydration is often over emphasized as "the answer", it is not. Heat stress is a condition where the body is overheating and cannot reject the excess heat. Hydration helps, a lot, but the individual has to get their body temp. down. Get to an air conditioned space or shade, remove outer layers of clothes, hose down or get in a cold shower. The body temp has to be lowered.
I have watched many football coaches nearly drown players only to have them get dizzy, disoriented, nauseous, confused, stop sweating, the onset of heat stroke.

You can strap a 10 gallon jug of ice water ( with salt if you like) to your back and drink as much as you want, but if you are wearing a parka and sweat pants in Alabama in August, walking briskly in the noon day sun you are going to go down to heat stress. You will be fully hydrated but you will die of heat stroke.

Manage your time and activity in the sun, dress properly, take cooling breaks inside AND drink plenty of clear liquids.
I hope this helps.
 
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