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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Perazzi MX5/20 that, when empty, opens easily when I move the top lever to the right. I can fire both barrels, easily open it again, and repeat. However, as soon as I shoot a shell through it, it is no longer easy to break open - now it takes a LOT of effort to open after moving the top lever. I mean some real muscle, to where I have been tempted to try and break it open over my knee. Anybody know what's going on here? Its a very lightly used, 20-something year old gun, though new to me - I just purchased it on Pacific Sporting Arms (who by the way was great to deal with!)

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
WOW, that is simple, and makes perfect sense. Now that I think about it, that's the only thing it could be. Thanks!
 

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The cocking rod, in the bottom/ middle of the receiver, may be fouled with old grease or just dirt. Take the trigger out and see if it’s moving freely. If not take it out and clean the rod and Journal it rides in. Re-lube with oil.
 

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The cocking rod, in the bottom/ middle of the receiver, may be fouled with old grease or just dirt. Take the trigger out and see if it’s moving freely. If not take it out and clean the rod and Journal it rides in. Re-lube with oil.
Can the "average" citizen remove, clean, and reinstall this cocking rod in a Perazzi TM-1?
 

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IDK. I’ve never owned one. I can do the OU Perazzi platforms in the dark but not the TM platform. I’ll bet it’s not too tough. Danielle Perazzi made his guns to service easily.
 

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yes, take a picture of the front orientation of the cocking rod and how the spring and screw fit together in the trigger opening.
Mr. Rackley, I genuinely appreciate your advice here! Thanks! I'll proceed carefully & slowly...and the photo is a great recommendation. This TM-1 is an exceptionally nice one...all original serial #19XX and had been stored with lots of white grease inside which had kinda solidified. I've cleaned it out but the action is still somewhat stiff. Some experienced shooters have thought it's still somewhat new and breaking in.
Thanks again for your advice!
 

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Mr. Rackley, I genuinely appreciate your advice here! Thanks! I'll proceed carefully & slowly...and the photo is a great recommendation. This TM-1 is an exceptionally nice one...all original serial #19XX and had been stored with lots of white grease inside which had kinda solidified. I've cleaned it out but the action is still somewhat stiff. Some experienced shooters have thought it's still somewhat new and breaking in.
Thanks again for your advice!
yes, take a picture of the front orientation of the cocking rod and how the spring and screw fit together in the trigger opening.
Well, I "chickened out"... I removed the trigger and barrel and pushed on the cocking rod. It moved easily and no evidence of caked up lubricant or dirt. The action is just tight...gun hasn't been shot all that much. Like Clint Eastwood said: "You need to know your limits" Tearing into a nice Perazzi is above my mechanical limit for sure. Regards...
 

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had been stored with lots of white grease inside which had kinda solidified. I've cleaned it out but the action is still somewhat stiff.
You may want to soak the entire receiver and trigger group in Kerosene!!!! Take off the wood first!!! It'll break up and clean all the moving parts while leaving a nice coat of oil on all them at the same time. This should free up all moving parts. Don't forget to oil/grease any moving parts recommended by the manufacturer too!!! break em all jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Check and make sure the locking block is the proper one. The fixed trigger guns should have the locking block that has a small bump on the back to pull the bottom hammer back thereby letting the bottom firing pin pull out of the spent primer.

feel free to call me to discuss.
Hi Don, I don't see a small bump, only a divot/triangular cutout. The opposite side has no bump or divot at all. Would you say this is the wrong locking block then?
IMG-1735 (1).jpg
 

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Good progress,

That cutout is correct, the stop plate drops down in there to lock the top lever to the right.
however:
1. Keep the stock off the gun, Rotate the receiver where the trigger guard is down
2. Look down between the cocked bottom (right) hammer
3. The rear of the cross bar of the Locking Block should have a rearward facing protrusion. The back of the cross bar of the Locking Block should not be straight.

Pls post pic if possible.

Don
 

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I’m not trying to be smart, but why would someone with limited or no experience or training on guns attempt to “fix” a problem on a $6000 gun? When, for probably less than $100,he could take it to a competent gunsmith and have the problem diagnosed and fixed in no time.
 

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I’m not trying to be smart, but why would someone with limited or no experience or training on guns attempt to “fix” a problem on a $6000 gun? When, for probably less than $100,he could take it to a competent gunsmith and have the problem diagnosed and fixed in no time.
Lots of folks don't have a competent gunsmith with experience with over/under shotguns; shipping a gun to someone might dramatically increase the cost and the turnaround time. Some folks just like learning how their guns work and how to do some relatively minor things, for fun and/or to save a little time and cash.

I leave some stuff (barrel fitting, wood fitting, and some other stuff) to the experts, but I'll try some things on my own. I've got a backup gun, so I figure if it gets to a point where I'm uncomfortable (or I've really screwed something up), I'll just pack it up and ship it off to an expert.
 

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Mpolans I agree, to each his own. But I know if it was me I sure as heck wouldn’t want to mess with a $6000 trap gun, to just “ learn how their guns work and how to do some relatively minor things, for fun and/or to save a little time and cash”. Maybe for you and me who are mechanically inclined it’s no big deal to start tearing into a receiver. But for someone who has never had the stock off, or for that matter even know how to take a stock off, it may just cost them more than a little cash and save little, if any, time if the have to pack it all off and make that trip to the smith or send it out. And I can’t believe that there are some people out there that don’t have a gunsmith within a couple hours drive.
Maybe I’d have some fun tearing apart a Stoeger or some other cheap shotgun, but not a $6000 Perazzi. That’s my opinion.
 
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