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Just redid a Winchester 9422m for a retired marine for the sixth time and every time lousy stinking fisheyes in the finish! I acetone cleaned the weapon 5 times, baking out any traces of oil between cleaning ,double filtered the compressor, blasted out the airlines, and cleaned the gun more times than I have fingers and still the same damn results. Finally figured out how I contaminated the whole damn quart of Gunkote. I usually use a turkey baster to fill the airbrush, but this time I used a hypodermic syringe to fill the airbrush reservoir. Sadly, did not realize that each syringe is lubricated with SILICONE! Of course the silicone ruined not only the gun finish, but trashed the entire quart of gunkote when I put the unused portion back in with silicone contamination. Just wanted to share my screw up, and save you all the aggravation and money in repeating my blunder.

Best wishes
Aloha One
 

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Silicone will certainly be the end of you...

I kinda thought you would have figured that out by now.
 
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Aloha,

One of my hobbies is building boats and along the years I have learned something I would never had guessed. I too would get a bad spray and could not figure out where it came from until someone told me.

Acetone. Although it appears to be oil free sometimes it is not and has small traces of oils and/or silicones in it.
Paper towels. Many of these have a coating to make them pull apart from the roll. Who knows what it is.
Dryer sheets. Don't use dryer sheets to dry your rags. If you use rags wash them in hot hot water and hang them to dry. If you put them in the dryer they will collect dryer sheet residue from the previous load.
And Syringes. You already found this out.
 

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First time using a syringe for this, never thought it was going to be problem but just goes to show you anything changed should be tested first. After 30 years of doing this you'd think I'd know that. Always thought syringes were totally antiseptically clean, as you re using it primarily to inject a chemical into a human body you would think silicone would be a no-no.
Aloha
 

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First time using a syringe for this, never thought it was going to be problem but just goes to show you anything changed should be tested first. After 30 years of doing this you'd think I'd know that. Always thought syringes were totally antiseptically clean, as you re using it primarily to inject a chemical into a human body you would think silicone would be a no-no.
Aloha
Silicone is hydrophobic. It sticks to the syringe rubber and barrel when NORMAL water based liquids are inside. It does come off and mix with other solvent based liquids.
 

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Back when I did bodywork and painting they made a product to eliminate fisheyes in paint. Don't know if it is still available. It had to be used if a vehicle was previously painted using it. Call an auto paint supply store and chack.
 

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50ralph is correct. They made a fish eye reducer that you put an eye dropper full into a cup of paint. If the car had been waxed with certain waxes they would fisheye.
 

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Experience is such a great teacher and I am continually amazed at the wealth of knowledge on this forum by its many members.
All of us are smarter than some of us again rings true.
 

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Painter for 10 years and paint rep for 10 more. Fisheye eliminator is straight silicone. Used to break the surface tension of the paint so it can flow into the problem fisheyes. Use as a last resort. If you get a fisheye, best thing to do is don't put anymore paint on it. Then as it sets up(you could force dry the eye with air) lightly and I mean lightly dust paint onto the eye till covered. If you get it wet, bam fisheye is back. Problems the fisheye eliminator will add to the job, paint will want to run, orange peel appearance, and once you add it, you have to keep adding it. Hope this helps.
 

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Painter for 10 years and paint rep for 10 more. Fisheye eliminator is straight silicone. Used to break the surface tension of the paint so it can flow into the problem fisheyes. Use as a last resort. If you get a fisheye, best thing to do is don't put anymore paint on it. Then as it sets up(you could force dry the eye with air) lightly and I mean lightly dust paint onto the eye till covered. If you get it wet, bam fisheye is back. Problems the fisheye eliminator will add to the job, paint will want to run, orange peel appearance, and once you add it, you have to keep adding it. Hope this helps.

You are absolutely right. Only problem is you usually don't know that someone else used fisheye eliminator until you start painting. I didn't like using it unless absolutely necessary. When working in a flatrate shop you don't make out well if you run into this problem. I didn't miss body and paint work when I quit doing it one damn bit.
 
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