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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Trapshooters.com. Long time reader first time poster.

Wanted some of your opinions on a new issue that has arisen. The last few weeks I have noticed that my gun hurts my cheek. One night it kicked the living snot out of me. I only shot a few rounds of protection and one round I missed every single shot because it was hitting my cheek so hard.

I have shot this BT-99 for three years with no issues. I asked the guys at the protection shoot what they thought and they said two things. 1) You're shooting hotter shells than usual. 2) You're mounting your gun different.

1) I have always shot 3 dram at the 27 and 3-1/4 for pickups and shootoffs no problem.
2) I lost 20 lbs in the summer and noticed I needed to mount the butt more inward to my chest for consistent fit and a natural look. I have since gained that 20 lbs. back and believe my mount has not changed since this summer. It feels right when I mount it.

More thoughts and observations from me. I had to buy a case of 2-3/4 dram ounce of 8s loads for trap league due to some ammo shortage. I usually shoot 2-3/4 dram 1-1/8 ounce for 16s and shorter handicaps. 3 dram 1-1/8 for longer handicaps 24ish+. No problem switching between 7.5s and 8s.

Does a lighter load at the same dram have a larger felt recoil or have a different enough pulse to bang up my cheek like that?

I have also thought about it and my gun probably needs cleaned and oiled. If the barrel is dry does it make it harder for the wad and shot to exit and will kick the crap out of my face?

Or am I just getting too old and whiney? Thanks for your input! -Sean
 

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Yes. Toughen up.


often when we begin to feel discomfort at the comb, we lighten up. and that is when the comb bites back. Get into the stock and your problem will/may go away. Until that time shoot 2-3/4 dr. Regardless of what Gary says
 
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Do what Jack said. Also, I think you will find success adjusting the pitch of your recoil pad. With the mentioned weight gain, I would suggest trying a spacer that will bring the top of the pad out a little bit.
 

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try to take a short break..also go with the lightest loads you can lay your hands on..light 1oz would be great 7/8oz even better...the Cheek-Eez pads that stick on your comb might help take a little bite out of the hard edge..grip it tight into your shoulder pocket and try to not force your face into the new comb pad..let it absorb some of the "pop"...after things settle you can ease into hotter stuff again if you really think you even want to...7/8oz will break them fine ..you can also hang a little extra well placed weight on the gun..99's are a touch light
 

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Put a couple washers on the top recoil pad screw, between the pad and the butt stock. Add washers one at a time until the hurt goes away. This is an easy way to adjust the guns pitch. Once you get it right you can have a spacer made. HMB
 

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A little while back, Dave Berlet did a thread on here about the gun hitting you in the cheek. Seems to me, he and Brad Dysinger suggested getting your recoil pad set to zero pitch, and that would stop the gun from hitting you in the face. You might want to try to contact Dave or Brad, on this site, and get their opinion. Their suggestion worked for me!
 

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For myself when I feel the comb take a bite of me I have raised my head.

One of my back up SBT's sounds like someone hitting two hard wood sticks together when I shoot it, when I lighten up or raise my head I hear that sound twice, than feel the bite

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the helpful replies.
So from my original post, the only thing that people have really touched on is how the gun is mounted along with keeping the head down. So the other things are probably not the culprit and I tend to agree.

I forgot to say as well in the summer when I lost 20 lbs, I went to shoot at the Cardinal Classic for a week. Second day in I came home with a sore shoulder. I iced it and put muscle rub on it thinking I would not be able to shoot all week. The next day I felt I needed to change something so I pulled the gun in closer to my chest from my shoulder. This helped me keep my head down and fit better into the pocket. I did pretty well for scores after that and I shot the whole week without any shoulder trouble. At this time I also began working out a bit.

Since then I have gained that weight back and have not changed my mount back. I really don't know how to change it back. It doesn't feel right anywhere else. But at the same time this doesn't feel the best either. After thinking about it last night, I feel as if my head is at a right angle and instead of putting my cheek up against the comb my head is laying over top of it. I did think at first I was lifting my head, but I have consciously tried to make the effort with the same result.

I think the real issue is the gun doesn't fit me anymore. Instead of the recoil going into my shoulder the gun is going up and knocking my cheek. I didn't know 20 lbs. of weight could throw something off so much.

I really didn't want to change anything on my gun, because I shot really well this year and I know how some people are always trying to correct something and their scores drop. I think I do need to make some modifications though. I do like the washer idea in between the stock and butt pad. I think if I do this I can mount it higher on the shoulder and have a better fit. I have some time off for a bit before the seasonal meat shoots and I will try and rework it.

Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Calvin, "try to take a short break." That is ludicrous! Well at least you said try. :)
 

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Sean,

What you are suffering is known as cheek slap. It has a number of possible causes.

1) As someone suggested, raising your cheek off the comb slightly, will cause it. The comb then impacts the cheek rather than nudging it.

2) The pitch (angle formed by the recoil pad and the rib), if it is wrong, can cause it. The pitch is right for you when, as you mount the gun with the barrel raised to the normal shooting height, the whole recoil pad, top to bottom, makes simultaneous contact with your shoulder.

3) Mounting your gun low on your shoulder or having a stock that requires you to lean your neck forward and lower your cheek to put it on the comb can cause cheek slap.

4$ So can tilting your head toward the stock to put your cheek on the comb.

The last two can cause it because you end up making contact with the comb with a more sensitive part of your cheek nearer the end of your cheekbone where there are more pain receptors.

When you mount the gun, your head should be in a natural and erect posture. You should not need to lean your neck forward and lower your cheek to the comb.

Depending on the length of your neck (and to a great extent your overall height), you should mount your gun so the top of the recoil pad extends close to an inch above your collarbone - IF - your neck is long enough to allow putting on your cheek on the comb without raising your head to do so.

If your height (and neck length) still doesn't allow you to mount the gun with an natural and erect head and neck posture and you still have to lean your neck forward and lower your cheek to put it on the comb, a unit called a pad adjuster will solve the problem. It would allow the whole recoil pad to be lowered.

How tall are you?

Rollin
 

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" I feel as if my head is at a right angle and instead of putting my cheek up against the comb my head is laying over top of it."

That comment explains the problem. You can't see straight down the rib without mashing you cheek against the comb and rolling your head over on the comb to compensate. I have the same problem with factory stocks and the recoil is brutal against my cheek. If this is the case, you will need a stock with offset. A custom made stock.
 

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I used to get beat up the same way. I made lots of adjustments with combs, pitch shims, pad adjusters and still had issues. I ended up shooting better scores by getting into the gun more as some suggested, but the result was more soreness. Finally, I bit the bullet, saw a fitter and adjusted my shooting form -- picked my head up, raised my comb more with extended posts, and added a taller rib. Ah, cheek relief and the muscle tension in my shoulders and neck eased. Everyone is unique and shooting in as natural and "muscle-neutral" of a position as possible works for me.

Longnecks aren't just on beer bottles and I'm taller than the average bear and thinner than the average trapshooter...
 
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