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I am 6'4" and I shoot an out of the box 1100 classic trap. I average 90 on singles, but I don't shoot very often. When I shoot I have to bend my neck quite a bit. My question is should I get a recoil pad that is adjustable and lower it to raise the gun to my check?
 

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I agree with HaveGun... Mounting your gun with the heel even with the top of your shoulder with the pitch that is best for your shoulder configuration will also help, not only with the security of gun mounts but in reducing the distance you have to lower the recoil pad.

Another thing that will help compensate for your long neck is shrugging your shoulders as you mount your gun. These two things, a higher gun mount and shrugging might even eliminate the need for a stock adjuster, the "adjustable butt plate" HaveGun mentioned.

Rollin
 

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I am in the same situation with my 1100 classic trap. I get it back from the gunsmith Friday night. I will post on how this works out for me this weekend. I went with the 100straight hardware with a kickeez pad.

Forrest
 

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Bill,

The answer would be dependent on just how much too long the stock is and whether it is too long for an adult or a child.

Generally speaking, a stock with a parallel comb that is too long would tend to be awkward to more difficult to swing accurately. Stock length is also dependent of the correctness of the stock's drop at the heel dimension and the height of the gun mount. A stock that is too long would also promote a poor gun mount with the head and neck tilted or leaned too far forward, with their accompanying problems. There would also be a tendency to mount the gun too far out on the shoulder and/or rotate the stance too far in the direction of the side of the gun mount, i.e. a rifle-like stance.

If using a field stock with a rising comb, consistent gun mounts would be difficult. The cheek could be placed on a part of the comb at varying distances below the rib and introduce the possibility of differing cheek pressures if the shooter checks the front and mid bead aliment following every mount. Too much or too little cheek pressure is not likely to remain the same during swings and would result in varying vertical points of impact.

For younger shooters the problems are exaggerated, with the addition of a tendency to put too much weight on the back foot, possibly to the extent of introducing cheek slap.

Rollin
 
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