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By grounding your reloader, you eliminate all static electricity- right??. does this also help with getting a more consistant powder drop? thanks,dennis
 

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No guarentee the grounding will remove any static affecting powder drops. The best method I have found is to keep the humidity level at around 50% in my loading room. I have a Humidifier on my furnace that works great for this. No static and great powder drops.

This has been discussed many times here. Search the archives for past discussions.
 

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There are 2 schools of thought on this. Some say grounding will drain static electricity. Others say it's not possible to eliminate static electricity through grounding because static electricity is, well, static and does not move. The humidity control method prevents static electricity from building.
 

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Actually you only need 35 percent relative humidity to eliminate static. Grounding the loader does not do anything.

My PYREX glass powder reservoir seems to be less affected by static charge than the plastic reservoirs.

Draining the powder reservoir when you are done reloading will keep the powder from clumping which will affect the powder drops.

Jim Skeel<br>P/W Dealer/Distributor
 

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Jim is right, grounding the loader won't do anything at all. The powder flakes will still stick to the plastic because plastic is not a conductor. The metal parts of the loader won't be electrically charged. The loader is grounded every time you touch it. How many of you have ever been shocked touching a loader? Any talk of energized metal parts of a loader holding powder in place is BS.
 

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All the dryer sheet does is keep a few flakes from sticking to the powder tube. Why is a few flakes on the plastic tube a problem in the first place?
 

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Yes, this has been discussed. Yes, any electrical charge can be dissipated by grounding including static electricity. Indeed, when you are shocked by static electricity that is the charge going to ground. Yes, it does help to ground the reloader but you can't place the ground on an insulated part, like plastic, because it is an insulator. Check out the physics classroom for more information.
 

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So, when i get zapped when i touch a door knob in the winter time, which is the ground: me or the doorknob?
 

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Neither, the electrons are balancing between you and the door knob, hence touch it a second time and you get nothing. The electrons are still there but now have zero potential, because they are balanced. Now rub your socks on the carpet and touch it again, yep you get shocked. Touch it again and get nothing. now stand completely still and swing the door back and forth over the carpet, if it touches the floor it will pick up enough electrons to shock you when you touch it. Static electricity is a very high voltage, even with leather gloves on you can still feel the shock. Static Electricity is a very interesting thing and very hard to control. Some high dollar electrical components come with a bracelet that you put on your wrist to eliminate the possibility of transferring a static charge to the component which could damage it. There is endless amount os reading material on static electricity and many theory's about it, this is just one theory I learned about in college. Also Static is a deceiving term because static electricity does flow, kind of.
 

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I added a link, my memory was very close but the terminology I used wasn't quite spot on. So the link is a pretty easy one to understand. Hope it helps.
 

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I grounded mine a few years ago, but didn't notice any improvement in the powder sticking to the inside of the tube.


What really helped with more consistent powder drops, was adding a small electric motor to the loader, with a vibrating, off-centered piece on the main shaft.


I can plug this in, and watch the powder settle down in the tube, and when I weigh a charge, it is within .1(+/-) every time, but mostly dead on.


I use Red Dot.
 

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DO NOT USE THE DRYER SHEETS. If that sheet drops in father then you want it will stop the powder from dropping. It will happen.

I do have a grounding wire copper on my loader. It does help. When I run my finger up the powder tube no powder follows the finger. I also have a dehumidifier in the room.

There is no harm in doing so, only good results.
 

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A Humidifier is the only thing I've found to make a difference, or an air ionizer if you have one. Grounding a press is possibly dangerous. All of the grounding devices we use are required to incorporate a current limiting resistor or similar device. It is basically a 1 MegOhm 1/4 watt resistor in series. It does not allow a large current flow, but since static electricity is high voltage and low current, it does not really impede the dissipation. If the ground you connect to isn't a real ground, you could have a potential present that could be dangerous without the current limiter. I work with antistatic devices every day. My workstation is grounded through a central point with the current limiters incorporated there.

There are also regulations regarding transfer and storage of flammable materials from just about every federal agency that could be related.

See page 1, 4, and 5 of the document at this link:

<a href="http://www.minicircuits.com/app/AN40-005.pdf" target="_blank">Anti Static Precautions</a>
 

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I have tried attaching a ground to my machines and didn't notice any difference. I began storing my hulls in empty cardboard target boxes, instead of the plastic storage boxes I use for long term storage. I will transfer the hulls into the target boxes, and keep them on the concrete floor prior to loading. It seems to help. I think plastic seems to attract the static. Maybe not, I don't know for sure.

Steve
 

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The idea of grounding a loader is a perpetual myth.



" Yes, any electrical charge can be dissipated by grounding including static electricity."

WRONG. Non-conductors like plastic cannot be grounded.


"Indeed, when you are shocked by static electricity that is the charge going to ground."

NOT NECESSARILY. The person shocked may not be grounded at all. If the person is a lower potential, the static will move to the lower potential. Airplanes get zapped all the time. Spaceships can get zapped if they blast off in a storm. Lightning can move from one cloud to another. None of that stuff is grounded.

I have to be careful in the wording because volts don't move, current moves. Go ahead and ground your loader if it makes you feel good, just don't ground to your home electrical system. In case of a ground fault, you could be energized.
 
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