Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought a combo belt\disk sander off Amazon during their deal day cheap, made myself a pad fixture from 6061 aluminum, and have been grinding Limbsaver pads for my shotguns. Its a hell of a mess, but it sure is fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I bought a combo belt\disk sander off Amazon during their deal day cheap, made myself a pad fixture from 6061 aluminum, and have been grinding Limbsaver pads for my shotguns. Its a hell of a mess, but it sure is fun!
Which sander did you get?
 

·
What squad am I on?
Lots of different guns...
Joined
·
7,913 Posts
Use a band saw to cut the excess prior to grinding, keeps the mess to a minimum and cuts installation time in half. Same for adjustable pad hardware.
Fit two pads and you've damn near paid for the saw and sander vs paying someone else to do it.
I use WEN brand, bench-top, two sanders, band saw and a grinder. They've worked great with little or no adjustment and paid for themselves many times over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Which sander did you get?
Rikon 50-161VS Power Tools 1 x 30 Inch Belt, 6 Inch Disc Variable Speed Sander
I see it is unavailable now on Amazon but above is the c/p off the item. I love the variible speed adjustment. I do wish I had gone bigger on the disk end. I ground 1/2" off 1 of the stocks because I put a 1.125" thick pad on a 101 and it made the LOP too long for me. A larger disk diameter would be easier to grind. The back side wants to pull the stock out of your hand if you don't hold it stout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Use a band saw to cut the excess prior to grinding, keeps the mess to a minimum and cuts installation time in half. Same for adjustable pad hardware.
Fit two pads and you've damn near paid for the saw and sander vs paying someone else to do it.
I use WEN brand, bench-top, two sanders, band saw and a grinder. They've worked great with little or no adjustment and paid for themselves many times over.
Smart thinking. Make it easier on yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I have a cheap Taiwanese disc and 1 inch belt, and wish I had bought better quality.
I have been able to do a few pads with good results.
So far my only complaint is my eyes!🤣 It's hard to see my line. If you scratch a good line(i use a sharped piece of tungsten) and fill it with something of contrasting color it makes it easier to see, but my eyes are getting bad up close.
 

·
What squad am I on?
Lots of different guns...
Joined
·
7,913 Posts
So far my only complaint is my eyes!🤣 It's hard to see my line. If you scratch a good line(i use a sharped piece of tungsten) and fill it with something of contrasting color it makes it easier to see, but my eyes are getting bad up close.
Wear a headlamp and use a mechanical pencil. It'll glow well under the headlight and no worry of marring the stock. I have a very well lit shop but wearing a headlamp is literally a night and day difference because no matter how well your shop is lit, once you're hunched over the grinder trying to see, you're casting a shadow. Headlamp eliminates this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,145 Posts
Plan ahead. A black line on a white surface is easier to see. So paint now scribe later and a light hit with a block of sand paper and the white is gone.

Seeing that cut to line needs light lots of light! Several or A bunch of clip on utility lights can also give you the light to make it better.

Al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,145 Posts
Saw cutting a pad? Leave the toe and the top alone! They need to be very close to the lines of the stock to look good. One little oops there can take away from the looks of the final product.

Al
 
  • Like
Reactions: 813boom and jk80

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,570 Posts
If you are contemplating buying a machine that you might need twice in your lifetime good, or else send it to Tron. He is the "stock father "
Plus. Kitty is about out of catnip. Need the cash to restock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
Not doing Tron out of a job. He's not close enough to me.
There are lots of shop jobs justifying a disk and belt sander.
Recoil pad fitting is just one.
I'm sure that I have had the $100 value out of mine, many times over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Not doing Tron out of a job. He's not close enough to me.
There are lots of shop jobs justifying a disk and belt sander.
Recoil pad fitting is just one.
I'm sure that I have had the $100 value out of mine, many times over.
I'm on my 3rd pad. Showed some guys at the gun club my work. All these faces started lighting up. I told them no way. Costs $200/each guys. One guy said that won't make you much money. I said that's the point!

Already got my money out of it. I use a belt sander at work at the time to debur or chamber parts. I don't know how I did w/o at home so long.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
I use a black marker to darken up the back of the pad before I mount it. Makes the scribe line show up better. I also cut my pad down with a bandsaw before sanding. I have the pad mounted on the jig and set both angles when sawing it out. This really cuts down on the amount of sanding. I also use two different grit belts, 240 and 320 when sanding. To see the scribe line I bought a set of magnifiers on Ebay years ago. They are what surgeons use. It keeps me from bending over to see the line and it has a very bright light. Regards, Bob
Magnifiers.jpg
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top