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Focusing on the beads.

9720 Views 84 Replies 58 Participants Last post by  jono12
At KY State Trapshoot one of my squad members said he was focused on the front bead when he called for the target. He ran 100. Another buddy of mine told me he was focused on the front bead when he called for a target, he carries low "A" average.
Starting with focus on the bead seems counterproductive and counterintuitive in shooting moving targets, but it works for them.
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Well if he is truthful he really should try not starting that way…lol. There are a couple facts that just cannot be overcome. 1). Focusing on the bead while calling the bird is going to make you pick up the bird a tad slower. That has to be a fact. 2). As soon as said shooter picks up the bird they aren’t focusing on the bead anymore. It’s impossible as they couldn’t track the moving target if they were looking at the bead. Hence there can be no possible advantage to starting this way. The only possibility is it makes you slightly slower seeing the target out of the house. Just because someone shoots well using this method doesn’t mean that aspect of the method actually is good or helps.


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I am struggling with this right now. My scores had significantly dropped. I didn’t even realize I was doing it.

Finally started looking for the bird instead of the bead and broke a 49 yesterday. Felt good to figure out and fix the problem. Now if only I keep it that way haha.


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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, for sure the "A" average is telling me the truth. And i have no personal doubt they are looking at the bird when they shoot.
 

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So there is focusing on the beads and seeing the beads. I know several shooters, AA & A, that say they put the bead where they want to hit the target. Frank Little talked at length in his book about the bead/bird relationship. Derrick Mein, probably the best all around shooter in the world right now, said in a recent interview that his eyes never leave the gun. Michael Diamond, consecutive Olympic Gold Medalist in Trap and 5 Gold Medals in World Trap & Trap Doubles says he puts the bead on a spot on the target where he wants to hit it.
So what are these guys seeing that most of us don't?
 

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At KY State Trapshoot one of my squad members said he was focused on the front bead when he called for the target. He ran 100. Another buddy of mine told me he was focused on the front bead when he called for a target, he carries low "A" average.
Starting with focus on the bead seems counterproductive and counterintuitive in shooting moving targets, but it works for them.
Either 1.) It is the truth, and it works for them, or 2.) the are throwing you a red herring. If it works for them, great. If they're throwing you a red herring, throw one back. I shoot with a guy who will talk you ear off about how to break birds. I've learned to tune it out, and better earplugs help, too. :sneaky: When I was a teenager, I focused on the bead then called for the bird all the time. Older eyes don't focus as quick near to far.

Well, for sure the "A" average is telling me the truth. And i have no personal doubt they are looking at the bird when they shoot.
It is a physical fact the eye can focus from a far object to a near object faster than the other way around. (True at any age, but more so as we get older) It has to do with the way the cilliary muscles and zonules shape the crystalline lens, . A young eye can still focus from near out fast; but over time, the crystalline lens hardens and eventually needs time measured in seconds, not milliseconds, to focus from near to far. (In my case, about 2 seconds.)
The Army teaches to 'scan your sector' from far to near, then back, because the eye will detect movement up close faster. (Due as much to the crystalline lens focusing as the rods and cones, particularly rods, picking up movement in the peripheral vision.) Combat veterans develop the "thousand yard stare", either from the training, or on-the-job, so to speak for this reason. (There may be other reasons involved, too.)

This is why many coaches recommend "The Quiet Eye" system for Trap, as well as it being used in other shooting disciplines as well. With your eyes focused on an area out past the clay pigeons max. flight path, (51 yards or more) you check the bead(s) quickly to assure correct mount then shift focus to that spot farther out, wait for the view to focus well, (the older you are the longer, so it might be a minute or two for you, Charlie... ;) ) <note: I think my 'mantra' here, but it is not necessary> then call pull. You will pick up the bird with your peripheral vision, and do what you've done thousands of times before, break the bird.
 

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These are your friend when you (finally) decide to dump the bead(s). But check your thread size!

 
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