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Hey Gents, been doing a few years of trap and skeet now and got tired of wasting more money than I had to on cases of shells. So my buddy went out with me and I picked up my reloading press and all the extras. I reloaded a box of 2-3/4 shells with 1-1/8 oz wad and 6 shot, loaded w209 primers and used green dot powder, my question is with my first box I have ever reloaded what is he worst possible scenario that could happen if I just so happened to reload these hulls incorrectly? Any tips or tricks or just some words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated as well, thanks y'all
 

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What is the worst case scenario if you loaded them incorrectly? Well, I suppose the worst that could happen is your gun could blow up, but that is unlikely. Could you give us some more info one what your load is? How much powder? Why the #6 shot?
 

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That's just what my buddy and my brother said were a good starting shot for trap to figure out what you like, plus it was the same shot that I was reloading my Winchester AA's with, I couldn't tell you the exact measurement of powder since I didn't weigh it I just used the bushing that corresponded on my reloader chart which would of been a .148 I believe. I know that's not much help
 

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#6's are not allowed at most trap clubs and not legal for ATA shoots. Mute point right now. You need to know the exact powder charge. Do you use a scale at all or just match the bushing from the book.
 

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I can't speak to what might happen if measurements are off. I can say that the trap club I shoot at regularly will not let people shoot shot larger than 7.5, and from my limited experience 6 shot is not what you would use for trap. I can also say that you should not trust the powder bushing charts. In my experience sometimes they are close and sometimes they are not. You should always check the powder with a scale to make sure the bushing is dropping the correct amount of powder for your recipe. What recipe were you using for your shells and where did you find it?
 

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You need to get a scale to determine just how much powder you are dropping. Those bushing charts are not accurate and are close enough to get you in the ball park. I guess in your case, it's possible they could bar you from shooting because many ranges have shot size limits and 7 1/2 is the biggest allowed. Shooting #6 would be a no-no. You also ought to consider acquiring a copy of Lyman's 5th edition shot shell reloading guide.
 

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I can't speak to what might happen if measurements are off. I can say that the trap club I shoot at regularly will not let people shoot shot larger than 7.5, and from my limited experience 6 shot is not what you would use for trap. I can also say that you should not trust the powder bushing charts. In my experience sometimes they are close and sometimes they are not. You should always check the powder with a scale to make sure the bushing is dropping the correct amount of powder for your recipe. What recipe were you using for your shells and where did you find it?
Honestly I shot all of my target shells (federal) and all I had left were my Winchester AA's that I had lying in my truck from pheasant hunting and I figured you'd never wanna reload a federal so I just bought 6shot to reload the AA's, not really looking for skeet/trap advice looking more for reloading advice
 

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Honestly I shot all of my target shells (federal) and all I had left were my Winchester AA's that I had lying in my truck from pheasant hunting and I figured you'd never wanna reload a federal so I just bought 6shot to reload the AA's, not really looking for skeet/trap advice looking more for reloading advice
They don't make AAs in #6. And there's nothing wrong with reloading Federal hulls. They just take Federal style components.
 

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The re-loading advice already given would apply to anyone reloading a shell regardless of what that shell would be shot at. A trap shooter who is re-loading would want to use a scale to verify powder weight and utilize a recipe from a veritable resource. A skeet shooter who is re-loading would want to use a scale to verify powder weight and utilize a recipe from a veritable resource. A hunter who is re-loading would want to use a scale to verify powder weight and utilize a recipe from a veritable resource. Anyone who is re-loading would want to use a scale to verify powder weight and utilize a recipe from a veritable resource. If you're not willing to do that I would suggest returning your loader. If you don't want to do that then please let us all know the worst case scenario if you load the shells incorrectly since it seems like you're likely to find out before too long.
 

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That's just what my buddy and my brother said were a good starting shot for trap to figure out what you like, plus it was the same shot that I was reloading my Winchester AA's with, I couldn't tell you the exact measurement of powder since I didn't weigh it I just used the bushing that corresponded on my reloader chart which would of been a .148 I believe. I know that's not much help
Stop listening to your buddy and your brother. Then get yourself the Lyman's book. Then get yourself a high quality digital scale. Put the bushing in that you think you need, then measure how much powder you are actually dropping, then adjust as required.

The data will tell you what combinations of components are to be used. The biggest shot you should be using for trap is #7.5. The data is to be strictly followed, that is where you get your information.

You can get all the data for free from the powder manufacturer's websites. Always use the latest data available for the powder you are using. The formulations change from time to time.

If you are loading the 6s for pheasant hunting, that is fine, but again, you have to follow the exact data.
 

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Hopefully your bushings are throwing light powder charges as normal mec bushings do and no one has altered them. You need to stop loading until
you pick up a scale and a reloading manual with the proper size shot before going on.
 

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The advice given to purchase a reloading manual and a good scale is sound advice.

Don't trust bushings to drop the correct amount of powder. Double check what is dropped over 8-10 rounds and do an average drop for that can of powder. Be consistent in how you manipulate the machine.

Case in point CLAYS powder from the current production casts about 2 bushing sizes heavier in my MEC bushings than the older Australian production. For example if I were to load a shell near maximum amounts thinking my bushing was gospel I would actually be loading significantly more powder meaning I would be loading shells at an unsafe pressure level.

Enjoy your reloading experience.
 

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What is the worst case scenario if you loaded them incorrectly? Well, I suppose the worst that could happen is your gun could blow up, but that is unlikely. Could you give us some more info one what your load is? How much powder? Why the #6 shot?
I think you'll find that 7.5 ore number eight shot will work just fine
 

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I reloaded a box of 2-3/4 shells with 1-1/8 oz wad and 6 shot, loaded w209 primers and used green dot powder, Any tips or tricks or just some words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated as well, thanks y'all
If you want to get 1/2 opinion. 1/2 fact from any of us, you need to give us details. What wad? they all create different pressures with a specific primer. What was the bushing charts weight ballpark? what hull? only then can a guess be made how far over or under you can go...and i mean A GUESS!

I would strongly recommend you keep that box of shells on the shelf until you get A scale and some valid reload data . cut one open and weigh the charge. then compare it....only then you can make a decision to shoot them. DO not take a chance with reloading!

When you ask whats the worst that can happen, the only answer is: You will be the first to know.... and then you can tell us
 

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Just dont have any pistol powder near by... Stay within the charts on powder drops. I will get flamed for this but I really dont care what primer you put with the load. It seems like a minor difference.....its getting hot already:decil2:.
 

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One thing that you need to watch out for while actually reloading is for a piece of shot to roll into the primer seating station. It can happen on any press, but most often progressive ones. It could also possibly set off you powder and blow something up.
Don't rush through things either. All that does is give you inconsistent shells, and stuff you don't want to happen WILL happen. Slow down, turn on the radio, and enjoy yourself. Reloading should be fun, not a chore.
I also weigh all my shells so I can catch the ones without powder.
 
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