Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I figured a few shooters on here have experience with stock finishing, so I'd like some advice.

I just bought a Rem. M-788 that's arriving next week. Stock is stripped to bare wood. It's probably birch or beech.

My finish ideas are:

1. hand rubbed tung or linseed oil
2. a stain plus a hard clear finish of some sort
3. spray paint job with the rough speckled type Krylon

What do you suggest on wood finishes?

And how well will paint stick and hold up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
I have had good luck with tung oil: thin coat, let dry, sand lightly with extra fine grit. Repeat 5 or more times. Finish with a good wax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
For a low buck job, I usually grab whatever stain I left over in whatever color I like that day and rub it on by hand. For a topcoat, I have used multiple coats of Tru Oil over multiple days. However, on the last one I did I used Minwax Helmsman spar urethane in a spray can. It dries quickly. I was able to put on several coats in a day. With either, I sand with a sanding pad between coats.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Really? I was wondering about spar urethane. My workbench has 3 coats on it and nothing penetrates it. It's been an excellent finish. So can what can you put spar urethane over? Tung oil or stain?
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
10,140 Posts
I would experiment with dyes on another piece of wood. Go to a wood working store and get a few different colors, like dark walnut, ret, yellow, orange....etc. Then hit it with a good 2 part poly. I've had great success with some of my lesser grade guns by doing just this.

Something to consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
If your ok with the wood, as some cheap woods look awful even if you put the greatest finnish in the world on them. Stain and a spar urethane works great you can make your own very easy, research some of the boat forums its a mix of linseed oils, Tongue oil, (all modified) and some urethane. I have professionally been finishing wood for years i'm surprised that in the world of stock finishing its like voodoo. But anyway, those textured paints look awesome! You need to sand good and use a filler, I recommend getting down to wood so there is no oil, then using an epoxy filler, anything will work, you can even use the stuff they sell at any big box store like JB weld. It will show through the paint if there are any grain showing through the primer. So after you sand it down to bear wood, prime it, then fill any thing with the epoxy, dry sand prime and paint it will look great.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I know nothing about epoxy filler. Can you get it in a spray can?

I can sand, prime, and paint but the epoxy filler is new to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Why not multiple coats of tru oil, will give a little and consistent color, easy to apply as many coats as you desire and touches up easily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,956 Posts
I repaired a broken stock on an old Husky 1640 and there was no way to hide the glass and re-bar that were needed to fix the old girl up I sprayed it with bed liner and now it looks like any old plain jane composite stock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
The problem of staining Birch or Beech is that the end grain takes up the stain too much, darkening the color. I think you need a sealant on the endgrain at least, before staining.
It looks to me like Winchester sprayed a clear coat on their Birch stocks, then a coat of colored lacquer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,363 Posts
Use a propane torch to make dark streaks so you get a alternating light and dark contrasting pattern, stain it, then finish with lin speed and 3000 grit sandpaper, minimum of 12 coats with only a few drops rubbed in at a time, sanding every other coat for a glass like no open pores satin finish that makes the wood look like smooth stone.
Aloha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,139 Posts
For an inexpensive refinish on cheap wood .

Make sure all the old finish is removed
Take a rag soaked in coffee and start rubbing it into the wood. When the dry wood is as dark as you want it apply finish.

Oddly enough some cheap wood has a tight easy to fill grain structure so that in five to ten costs it is done, where the expensive wood may take thirty to sixty coats using the same techniques.

Using coffee that would get thrown out anyway, you can work from a light tan to almost black for the expense of just a little elbow grease.

Al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
I would experiment with dyes on another piece of wood. Go to a wood working store and get a few different colors, like dark walnut, ret, yellow, orange....etc. Then hit it with a good 2 part poly. I've had great success with some of my lesser grade guns by doing just this.

Something to consider.
Hi Tron, what's your preferred 2-part poly?

-Scot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
I like this Deltron. You can get it at an automotive paint shop.

Thank you. I've only done this once and this is exactly what I used, I liked it as well and actually put it over a wild airbrush pink fade to purple airgun I did for my daughter on a super cheap stock I re-fit to a nicer gun. Can't find a picture but the whole thing was an experiment with a lot of new stuff for me at the time. Primed the wood with rattle can Krylon because it was really light colored, everything worked way better than it probably should have and this stuff was great. Thanks again for sharing.

-Scot
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top