Trapshooters Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am refinishing one of my stocks and using tru-oil for the first time. I have applied several coats, let them dry and smoothed them out using 0000 steel wool and 1400 grit sand paper. Right now the wood looks good but totally dull.
Can anyone give me some advice on how to apply the final coat of tru-oil? Will it polish up to a sheen after hardening?

Thanks, Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
Sounds like you need a few more coats. I think I used 25 or so when doing an old 1100 stock. I sanded in b/w some of the coats so I may have thinned it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,362 Posts
Try some Five F stock rubbing compound. After making sure your Tru Oil is DRY, put some on a cotton cloth and make it SHINE.

Even 0000 steel wool will at best put an eggshell finish on your stock.

This has worked for me for a long time.

Order from Brownell's. The product is on the site above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,463 Posts
My First question is,,, How ( or what with ) are you appling it ??? ,,,) are you using a rag, a brush or your fingers ?????, then like Eric asked above, how many coats did you apply, ??? you need at least 15 or more to fill all of the minute holes, ( this is if you are using your fingers) because the coats go on very thin, I would be glad to walk you through this if you tell me more, I use it all of the time and have done many many stocks and I am always asked on how I got then to shine, and mine really shine,Here is an example <a href="http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n37/drhuner/?action=view&current=Madel129.jpg" target="_blank">
</a><a href="http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n37/drhuner/?action=view&current=100_2213.jpg" target="_blank">
</a><a href="http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n37/drhuner/?action=view&current=100_2212.jpg" target="_blank">
</a><a href="http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n37/drhuner/?action=view&current=100_2210.jpg" target="_blank">
</a><a href="http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n37/drhuner/?action=view&current=100_2215.jpg" target="_blank">
</a><a href="http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n37/drhuner/?action=view&current=100_2214.jpg" target="_blank">
</a><a href="http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n37/drhuner/?action=view&current=100_2211.jpg" target="_blank">
</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,529 Posts
After the last coat of any finish is applied and sanded smooth, it is then time to begin the polishing phase of refinishing the wood. Talk to someone at a local auto body shop. The steps in painting a car are the same as finishing a piece of wood. Only the type of material varies.

I polished my stocks with a large, soft buffing pad (Wall Mart) and used a long bolt and large washers to mount it to my drill press. I put lots of water on the pad, quite a bit of liquid furniture wax and a little fine automobile buffing compound. This makes a wonderful mess when the drill is turned on and it will polish a stock very quickly at the lowest RPM the press can be set.

Only after the polish, can the flaws in the finish be clearly seen. Then you go back to more coats of finish and sanding.

Pat Ireland
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
I've not used it, but a friend just refinished a stock with TrueOil. He added one part thinner to two parts oil and airbrushed it on. It dried like glass. I was impressed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Mike, I did my Browning XT trap with the tru-oil. I applyed 7 or 8 coats with my fingers, rubbing it in. I used 0000 steel wool between coats and to make it really shine and slick, I allpyed 4 or 5 coats of Johnson's paste wax for wood furniture. It came out a really nice shine!

Cheers,

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,981 Posts
When rubbing the oil in, use the ball area (drumstick part of the thumb). You'll be less likely to get streaking. Keep rubbing until you feel some heat.

4 or 5 or 15 coats are not going to get the job done correctly. You need to keep applying until the grain is fully filled. Go back and look at the pictures above, you can still see tiny little divots. What those pieces of wood need is wet-sanding with some 1200 grit on a block. This will knock down the higher surfaces to the same level as the bottom of the divots. The divots are just deeper pockets in the grain.

NOTE--maybe what looks like divots is just the light.

A light steel wooling is OK between coats, but somewhere along the process, wet sanding is going to be needed to be sure all of the grain is filled.

If you apply any type of wax to the wood and then decide it needs more oil, you'll have hell to pay. It's better to know its perfect before applying waxes or even some of the buffing compounds.

After the grain has been filled, the top "finishing" coats can be applied..4-6 coats. Then you can CAREFULLY buff it out to a beautiful gloss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
thank you all for sharing your experiences with me.

What I have gleaned from all your responses is that there are no short cuts to doing a class A job on our stocks, whether one uses Linseed, tung oil or tru-oil, it takes time and effort. Sounds like the most important thing is that one continues to get rid of the little pores in the wood between coats by knocking down the surface to the level of the bottom of the pores.

I am not going for the glass look, I don't care for it on this gun. I want a soft glow with some shine. Thanks again everyone.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
drhunter, thanks for the eye candy shots....just beautiful! Merry Christmas and pour me another shot of Makers Mark....stuff is wonderful...lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
Question on a 5 year old tru-oil job. It was my first attempt and would like to go back and get some of the tiny holes filled. Can I clean the waxes etc off the stock and just start with the tru-oil again? I would like to wet sand with tru-oil and then finish again. There are about 20 coats on it now- Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
i also have found in refinshing stocks is make sure you have plenty of heat where you are letting them dry, i use to use a small old none working refridge , with a 100 watt light bulb in it , made a very warm place to let it dry over night, cold temps below 80 i found slow the process and done make a shine as heat will and also it seems to make it a harder finish i like tung oil my self better then tru oil, i like the low gloss for most stocks , overthe high gloss
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Several years ago I felt a need to learn to finish stocks. I received great advise, First by Ken Rucker Use a grain filler. This will fill the grain in 24 hours and save you 10 to 15 coats to try fill the grain. The filler was from Brownells. The manufacture was from Missouri the guy that rebuilds Browning's. I just don't remember his name, buy it from Brownells. The second was from another poster, I think his name was Fulpen I am sure I have misspelled his name. This Gentleman was just great. He recommended using a Brownells product called Gun sav'R custom oil.
I like using 0000 wool but not during the end process. I have missed some pieces with my tac rag and this makes for more work than it saved. I like the 320 wet and dry.

a href="http://s110.photobucket.com/albums/n114/jted1952/?action=view&current=DSCN02800001-1.jpg" target="_blank">
</a>

gun save'R gloss finish they also have a satin finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,529 Posts
Mike- The only way I have been able to achieve a quality soft glow finish is to start with a good high gloss finish and then tone it down. There is nothing like a high gloss finish to show up mistakes.

Pat Ireland
 

·
Sky Buster
Joined
·
4,036 Posts
For your final finish, use automotive "polishing compound" (not rubbing Compound) Apply it with a damp pad. The stock will end up with a "hi-gloss
finish".
 

·
Strong Supporter of Trapshooting
Joined
·
4,727 Posts
Should have also mentioned that I was a partner in a company here that made all of Weatherby's wood stocks. It has been several years since we choice to cease doing this... and probably the main reason you could not buy wood stocked Weatherby's for quite some time.

We used Permalyn (sold by Brownells). We rubbed in on in circular fashion; wet sanded it down. First couple of coats, we mixed walnut dust with it, and then the final coat was wipped on, let harden, and then we used a medium speed large wheeled buffer to get the typical Weatherby gloss finish.

Whiz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,750 Posts
I like Permalyn better than Tru-oil. Permalyn is a polymer and applies like Tru-oil but has a better color. I found that a really thick coat of Tru-oil has a green tint to it in the sunlight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
3MMM makes a auto clearcote scrath sp remover only a couble of bucks in a 1/2 pint squirt bottle at kracens or Pepboys really great for polishing finial cote.even plastic sratches Jon
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top