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My daughter shoots with her left lens taped. I believe she has issues with her left eye being a bit dominant. With trigger time, she has made it to average about 20 targets a round. Sometimes better, sometimes worse. Peeks and valleys. We all have them. I was asked the other day by a very well respected shooter and coach, "Why don't you coach your kids anymore?" I replied, There comes a time when you get the fundamentals down. Mechanically, they got it. You can guide them, assist as needed, offer advise once in a while, answer questions the best you can, but they are just gonna have to figure it out. For my daughter, close an eye, tape an eye, do what works. No substitute for trigger time on the trap field. Both my daughter and son have steadily brought up their average by having a love for the sport and never giving up. Even the boys on the FFA team asked my daughter to be the team captain this year. Sometimes I think folks can over coach...shooters must eventually figure it out for themselves by putting what works for them all together.
 

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Ok so she said that she does not have a dominance issue. At one time she questioned herself and her dominance and the practice of covering her left eye helped her overcome that insecurity.
I am just a kids' coach but insecurity does not seem like a good thing to be experiencing when you are shooting in a WC Final or the Olympics. It is a shame because she has no reason at all to be insecure. She lost the gold to Pirelli in Lonato only because nerves got to her at the very end. Of course, she is pretty young and inexperienced, but I am quite sure that having heard that "90% of all women" nonsense her whole life did not help.

I would remind her that of the 25 women she shot with in Tokyo, only 3 had tape on their lens, and the two that won gold and silver, and who were shooting two-eyed, were 5 birds ahead of the taped-lens Pirelli when she was eliminated.

Two eyes simply read targets better than one. You may get away with one-eyed shooting on slower, lower-azimuth and fixed-height ATA targets, but it is going to cost you in bunker, sooner or later. Maddy has zero reason to be "insecure" about eye dominance.

Also, Jeff, tell Grayson if he doesn't quit shooting 21's I am going to come down there and resume coaching him. That should straighten him out pronto. ;)

Can you believe he was ever this short? Kayle is not a tall person.
 

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Coaching involves far more than merely imparting the mechanics of shooting.

One must provide mechanisms to cope with stress, with expectations, with failure and with success.

Example. How do you coach a person to go on and shoot 99 when they dump their first if you haven't experienced that yourself?

How do you coach a person who is sitting on a 99 not to dump their 100th?

How do you coach a person to approach a shootoff? Or an ISSF final?

How do you teach coping mechanisms regarding a slow squad, a fast squad, or a shooter in your squad who misses every second target? How do you teach them the intricacies of the rules, and the proper way to challenge a wrong decision by a referee or scorer?

The mental aspects-visualisation, compartmentalisation, the ability to go from relaxed to aware to full focus and back again-are just as, if not more important, than how to break a target.

Now, I'm not saying that a good coach must have been the best shot ever. But IMHO they should be, or have been, good enough to appreciate those pressure scenarios, and to have developed mechanisms to cope with them that they can pass on and continue to develop with their students.

There's a great deal more to coaching than merely shooting with one eye or two.

And, be it noted, at no time have I used denigrating expressions such as "ignorant" or "bozo".
I could not agree with you more, but these advanced competition aspects should be taught later, not when they are young, beginning kids.

That is all I do, coach kids. But getting them started shooting correctly when they are young is critical to producing champions later. Putting tape on their lens is not starting them out correctly, at least as to the great majority of beginners, including females.

The shooting world is evolving right before our eyes. There will, I predict, soon be very few women winning much with tape on a lens, just as there are no men, and especially when you are talking about international trap targets. My experiments continue to prove that the vast majority of girls can do just fine shooting two-eyed.

You should see this little dynamo breaking bunker targets with her little 3/4 oz loads, shooting two-eyed. When she started a few months ago, she was blasting way to the left of every straight-away. Now she never does that. Go figure.

 

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Based on 30 years teaching I estimate the % of female shooters that HAVE to use some form of 1-eye while shooting trap is probably close to 97-98%.
HAVE meaning if they are going to shoot up to their potential.

What is crazy is that several of the top female trap shoot with 2 eyes and I have not figured out if they did anything different or are just the exception to the rule.
That’s amazing
 

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My lady shoots 2 eyed. Shot with Kim Rohde when they were both juniors.

Having said that, many/most of the women we coach shoot one eyed. So do some, but less as a %, of men.
My wife is starting out, had a guy at the club put his hand over her off eye while she was shooting and she started to hit them after missing alot
 

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Welcome to the forum, Sheepdog! Be prepared for Full n Fuller's bluster about how he could have got her winning big shooting using both eyes. 😉
 

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This is a long thread, which IMHO does provide (mostly) helpful information for female shooters.
To summarize (my opinion but based on documented studies and the opinions of experienced coaches):
1. On office testing women are only slightly more likely to be cross-dominant.
2. A distinct majority of non-elite female shooters however require an occlusive, likely related to a visual processing issue. Kim Rhode suggested 90%.
3. A distinct minority of elite level female shooters use occlusives.

I thought we look into what documentation is available regarding the female "top guns" historically. Unfortunately, the vast majority of images are posed, but it seems reasonable to assume the shooter assumed a shooting position and eyes open or close as she would in competition.

Lela Hall Frank, and 2 other female shooters, are shown at the 1940 GAH clearly closing their left eyes; at about 30 sec.
Men trap shooters on field in competition / pile of empty shotgun...

This is an Andy Griffith Show episode featuring Gail Davis "The Perfect Female", filmed at the Aqua Sierra Sportsmans Club. She starred in the 1950s television series "Annie Oakley". It was of course staged but she and Griffith were really shooting. She did not wear shooting glasses and was squinting in the sun but I believe shot with both eyes open. The shooting starts at about 2 min.


Standing Gesture Black-and-white Style Monochrome


Ginger Rogers who was a very good shot

Smile Gesture Vintage clothing Sky Event


Greer Garson

Natural environment Gesture Publication Poster Cloud
 
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