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For sale: Recently aquired as part of an estate sale a Winchester 37 single barrel 12 ga shotgun. 30" full choke barrel. Win made these guns from 1936 to 1963. Guns were not serial numbered so exact date of mfg is unknown. This gun is in remarkable condition. It was represented to me as all original in 98%+ condition. There are a few small safe and handling marks but gun is probably the nicest one you will find. No splits, cracks, or chips to wood. Metal is rust and blemish free. Hard to tell if it has ever been shot. COMES WITH ORIGINAL BOX. If interested please contact me at above email address or PM.

Price: $450 plus shipping (must ship to an FFL unless in Florida)

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My first shotgun was a model 37 in .410. A lot of rabbits and squirrels and even a couple of quail went into the pot thanks to it. Just like the early Fords you had a choice of chokes Full or Full.

--- Chip King ---
 

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The Winchester Model 37 was the very first gun that I ever bought. Being a young high school boy (1962) with no money, I took a crow bar to my wallet and paid the asking price of $10 for it.

Years later, I needed some cash and sold it. In hind sight, I still wish that I had that gun. It was a very good shotgun, and it worked every time.

Thanks for sharing the photo with us, as it brought back alot of memories for me.

Dave
 

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There were many variations of these, and collecting them would be fun. Red Letter models seem to bring more.

Condition is the good thing about this one.

HM
 

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Half, I've heard the same thing about the red letters.

Not sure if its true, but I have been told many of the Model 37s with full chokes were great for stillboard and card shoots, without any sleeving, backboring or choke modifications. Anybody have any experience with them in that game?

John E.
 

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The last one of these I shot was called a "clinker gun". It was built specifically to shoot 00 buck shot at clinkers. A clinker is a gob of molten coal ash that sticks on the walls of a water cooled furnace/steam boiler like at an electric generation plant. The clinkers cause hot spots to develop on the furnace walls and if you don't remove them the area under them melts and causes water leaks into the furnace. If you see a generation plant with steam coming out the smokestack, it is caused by tube leaks in the furnace which were probably caused by excessive clinkers.

This M37 Winchester had a barrel that had a wall thickness of about 3/16", and was built for industrial duty! We had about 2" of foam taped to the Buttstock. This gun was NOT fun to shoot, it literally kicked like a mule and you had to open a viewing port on the side of a positive pressure furnace and shoot while wearing heavy protective gear, and a very dark face mask so you could see the glowing clinkers, all the while getting blasted by the really hot air from the furnace.

This experience was obtained at the SoCal Edison Mohave Steam Generation Plant in Laughlin Nevada during the summer time in 1975. I had forgotten how much fun it was.

Randy
 

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Randy:

Your note brought back some memories.

Once upon a time I worked for a power company... for 30 years. I wasn't a power plant guy (ppg) but I dealt with them regularly.

Their 'slag guns' were ten gauge and used factory Winchester industrial shells specifically loaded for the purpose. They were abusive to shoot and the ppg's literally fought over who got the unpleasant chore of using them.

Depending on circumstances, boiler maintenance was either scheduled or done on an emergency basis. Either way, the boiler had to cool down enough for people to go inside. As the boiler cooled so did the slag which sometimes broke loose on its own. Besides creating hot spots, falling slag was a serious hazzard to the workers that had to go inside.

sissy
 

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Sissy: at the time in 1975 the Mohave Steam plant was a block load plant supplying 1/2 of LA's power. As such we ran balls out 100% of the time we were running and then at shut downs, they would mainly fix tube leaks, and insulation blow outs. Shut downs were few and far between sometimes 3 months at a time.

These boilers had slag hoppers with water in them that continuously removed slag from the bottom thru a crusher/conveyor system.

Well the dirtiest job on the whole site was having to "poke slag". This was done when a large clinker fell into the hopper and jambed the crusher and screw conveyor. They literally opened the bottom drain, and 4 laborers jambed a 30ft long piece of 1" steel rod up into the works and poked and pounded until they broke the clinker into small enough pieces to fit into the crusher. All of this done with the bottom of the furnace blowing hot dirty water out everywhere, and I mean everywhere!!! The poor bastards doing the work, had to wear full rain suits, boots and face sheilds in the middle of summer in Laughlin Nevada.

The fondest memeory of this for me was never actually having to do it. Since I was an operator at the time, all I had to do was open the bottom drain valve, which was remote operated from about 50 ft away, and watch the show. And what a show it was,,, It was the proverbial monkey trying to put the cork back in the pigs ass, shit flying everywhere!

Randy
 

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No way will a tube melt due to slag collecting around it. Actually, the slag acts as an insulator preventing heat transfer to the tube. Granted the slagging may cause problems in other areas of the furnace and will reduce the overall efficiency of the unit. The combustion process in coal fired units produces water and this can be seen as water vapor discharging from the stack during certain weather conditions. 35 years in power generation.
 

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Here was my "ultimate trap gun"..LOL... It's a 9478 Stevens.. with a 36" 10 gauge full choke barrel.. It sports a 12 gauge adapter locktighted in place.. and a PFS stock.. It's nickname is FUGLY...but the money its won from non believers is quite pretty.. Built on a bet that a gun that did not cost as much as a mans choketubes cost..could beat the challenger from the 27 yard line with Remington Shur Shot shells.. While he shot anything that could fit in his gun.. All that was done to the original gun was a trigger job.. At the end of the day.. it's not about name.. or locktime.. or 8's or 7.5's..It's about shooting.. While I love my Perazzi's and Coles and Seitz.. On that day.. nothing I've ever owned has ever shot any better.. The custom made PFS stock insured proper fit.. A few stones insured at smooth trigger.. I've often said.. A Remington 870 pump.. with a PFS is the ultimate starter gun..Very little recoil.. perfect fit.. and reliable as an anvil.. Everything else is BS..either you can shoot.. or you can't... The only targets you will ever buy..will come in a cardboard box.. The rest takes skill.. All Good.. Mike To answer the E-mails I just received.. The finished gun weighed 7 pounds 10 oz.. balance in the center of the trigger guard by adding weights on the PFS..
 
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