Eyes and trap shooting | Trap Shooters Forum

Eyes and trap shooting

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Duck 51, Aug 2, 2020 at 8:31 AM.

  1. Duck 51

    Duck 51 Active Member

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    I have a question concerning your eyes while trap shooting. During the day, is it better to shoot with dark lenses in shooting glasses so your pupils are more open or dilated or is it better to shoot with light or yellow lenses so you pupil are smaller? Or does it make any difference? Thanks!
     
  2. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    I prefer lenses that enhance contrast and let 40% or more of the light through. Rosy/red/coppery is the color I prefer in bright light. The lightest lenses I use (yellow) transmit 89%.
     
  3. MTA Tom

    MTA Tom Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it makes a difference.
    Wear the lightest tint that doesn't make you squint.
    Research "depth of field".
     
  4. Candy B

    Candy B Well-Known Member

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    I always heard use the lightest lens you can use without squinting. This allows more light to reach your eyeball and enhance vision. Then I read in Trapshooting Is A Game of Opposites to use the darkest lens you can use and still see the target to minimize the background . Like most things in this sport, there is no clear answer. Try both ways. I do know buy the best glasses you can afford. Good lenses reduces eye fatigue, helps you pick up the target faster and clearer.
     
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  5. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    As far as original question, the amount of time it takes going from daylight to dusk to dark and for the pupil to adjust does not take that long that you should worry about it. After dark, they turn on the lights.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020 at 2:04 PM
  6. jk80

    jk80 Well-Known Member

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    Bud decot said exactly what others above have said. Use the lightest tint you can without squinting.
     
  7. waldedw

    waldedw Well-Known Member

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    Yup it's a crap shoot, I have changed lenses in my rangers 4 times in one day, light purple, vermilion, amber and smoked depending on the background, cloud cover etc, it's nice to have those options, light purple is the one I use the most though.
     
  8. entropy

    entropy Well-Known Member Verified Youth Coach/Director

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    I use Nikon Transitions 8 Amethyst lenses in my Rx Shooting Glasses. They are at the right tint level for every situation when I need them; dark, they are more like CMT, and at every light level the purple makes targets stand out.
     
  9. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I still have annoying floaters after cataract surgery but no worse than before the surgery. I find the floaters not as bothersome with medium vermilion lenses on a bright sunny day. If there are any clouds in the sky I wear Lite Medium Target Orange.
     
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  10. Old_Diabetic_100

    Old_Diabetic_100 Well-Known Member

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    I've frequently read advice offered by opticians to shoot in glasses having the lightest tints available sufficient to avoid squinting. However, I shot for decades using very dark green lenses, particularly in bright light conditions like you routinely find in North America, South America, Southern Europe and Australia...........and found that more comfortable without adversely affecting my scores. These days, for the most part I shoot in light purple glasses in the UK where the light at our higher latitudes is not as intense.
     
  11. entropy

    entropy Well-Known Member Verified Youth Coach/Director

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    Dark green is an excellent all-around lens color for bright sunlight. It's what my motorcycling glasses are. The down side for shooting is it does not increase contrast, which is the main reason most shooters wear tinted lenses to begin with. In tropic areas the sun is intense enough where darker, polarized lenses are of the most benefit, color would matter less, and there are fewer choices for color in polarized lenses.
     
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  12. RAMARK

    RAMARK Member

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    In my opinion that is about the best advice you can get on the topic. Pure and simple. ANY colour lens will block light getting into your eyes.

    We made a short video on this topic last year that may help



    Good luck.

    Russell
     
  13. flyer47

    flyer47 Active Member

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    Since there was not any decent plastic lense choices decades ago, your dark green lenses were probably glass. Glass has superior optical qualities over plastics - another consideration when choosing a lense. The USAAF standard issue to pilots was a G15 glass lense starting around 1937. It was still the standard issue when I was in the late 60’s made by RE or AO. I switched to the B15 lenses about 10 years ago for better contrast. The Abbe value is used to measure optical quality or chromatic aberration. In 2001, a new material called Trivex was introduced which has a better Abbe value than CR-39 or polycarbonate but still not as good as glass lenses. Looks like the old dark green glass lenses served both you and I well for many years.
     
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  14. entropy

    entropy Well-Known Member Verified Youth Coach/Director

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    First it's lens, not lense. Not even in England. Everything in optics is a trade off. Glass has some better qualities, but it trades off others.

    Yes, a G-15 non=polarized glass lens. And it still is, in the A/O issue aviators. You are a pilot, you know why they were, and still are non-polarized. They were glass because CR-39 (Commonly referred to as plastic) lenses weren't invented yet. In non-prescription aviator glasses, it is still the standard simply because the other lens materials offered no major gain. Note I said non-prescription. This changes as one adds spherical, and more so, with toric power.

    No, it measures chromatic abberation only. "Optical quality" is a combination of qualities that are constantly traded off to achieve the best solution for the wearer.

    Yes, Trivex has many advantages over polycarbonate and CR-39 for some applications, and it also has some of glass for some applications.

    Yes, flint glass has the highest index of refraction of any lens material, but it also has some qualities that make it a poor choice for many uses. Even with hardening, it is relatively fragile. Most glass used these days is crown glass, who's index of refraction is lower (and thus Abbe value higher, they are inversely proportional) than hi-index plastic, but higher than polycarbonate, which is known for chromatic abberation, and certainly higher than CR-39.

    As you may well know, glass has one major drawback: It's HEAVY! I started out wearing glass lenses at 7, 50 years ago, and wore them until I was 24, when I started paying for them myself. (My folks and the Army paid for them before that). I have compound astigmatic myopia, this made my glasses thick and very heavy. The styles of the late 80's were huge frames, so I went to the PX and bought some frames with CR-39 lenses. the lack of durability didn't impress me, but the trade-off for much less weight was worth it! By the time I got out of the Army, polycarbonate lenses were of decent quality. (though when I started working as an optical lab tech, we still had to visually inspect lenses for carbon specks in them. This is no longer an issue.) Hi-index plastic lenses were just coming into use when I became a lab tech, and had some problems with being 'soft', but could achieve the thinnest, lightest lenses possible.

    I believe that what you refer to as 'optical quality' is clarity. All the materials used these days are capable of excellent 'optical quality' with the improved lens processing methods. The other advantages and disadvantages of each type of lenses still occur, but there is one thing that has changed in spectacle lens; Back then, glass was the norm and less expensive than the 'newfangled CR-39". Now, the reverse is true, and very few labs even do glass anymore, due to it still requiring the old method of generating lenses and attendant equipment. It is not compatible with the new generators. I will say that resetting the generator in the lab to do a glass job, then opening it and flushing it out and resetting it for plastic/poly jobs, and trying to maintain one-hour (yes I worked at THAT place) was a challenge.
    There are still some applications where glass is a better choice, and there are still some patients who insist on it. But both are becoming fewer between.
     
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  15. Old_Diabetic_100

    Old_Diabetic_100 Well-Known Member

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    The dark green lenses I used for shooting in the 60s, 70s and 80s were made from glass and not plastic. My prescription has never been extreme, so thickness and weight were never an issue for me. In the late 1990s I started using Zeiss shooting glasses similar to the ones in the link below. I've got 6 pairs with different tints. Over the years I've had them re-glazed (not with Zeiss material) several times due to slight changes in prescription. The colors I settled on are dark green, light green, light purple, light yellow, light orange and clear but I rarely use anything other than light purple, clear and dark green.

    zeiss_shooting_glasses
     
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  16. o-hale

    o-hale Well-Known Member

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    Have you ever noticed that on some days your eyes see things much clearer than other days.
    I experience that and have often wondered if what I eat has anything to do with it.
    There has to be a reason but I have not figured it out yet and probably never will.
     
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  17. Devonian

    Devonian Well-Known Member

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    When I got back into shooting in the mid 80's I was using RayBan dark green or grey aviators left over from when I flew planes. As I shot a lot under the lights I moved on to Decots with several different sets of lenses. I used and still use pale yellow for shooting under the lights and on very grey days. These days I tend to use light orange or light purple under most conditions, but if I have to shoot into the sun I use a dark bronze lense. As I have some large floaters in my master eye I will go to a darker lense if the light tends to be very bright as I find that I can focus on the target better.
    I think the lense colour that works for you under different conditions may not be the same as the next shooter. Also the type of target background also plays a big part in what lense colour you select.
    Devonian.
     
  18. Old_Diabetic_100

    Old_Diabetic_100 Well-Known Member

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    I've never noticed what you experienced, but I did notice something similar after drinking a bottle of red wine the night before. As a precaution, I always stopped off at the Duty Free and bought a bottle of French brandy before boarding my outbound flight whenever I was going shooting abroad. I'd have several nips before going to bed before a competition so I slept like a log and wasn't tossing and turning all night shooting imaginary targets. Some of the places we went to had water supplies of highly dubious quality so I always brushed my teeth at night and in the mornings in neat brandy. It made a pleasant change from Colgate tooth paste.
     
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  19. flyer47

    flyer47 Active Member

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    I think it is directly related to age - like reading small print as you age under low light conditions.
     
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  20. flyer47

    flyer47 Active Member

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    My understanding is that most high end Rx shooting glasses lens are made from CR-39. Would Trivex be a better choice given better impact resistance, lighter weight, resistance to scratches and decent optical clarity? The up charge for Trivex has decreased over the years, It is relatively easy to find a good optical shop pick your own frame, lens material, spec tint color and VLT. I am not a lens changer so that is not a consideration for me.