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Excellent Remington 3200

4240 Views 18 Replies 10 Participants Last post by  Robert (Bob) Hartman
An excellent Remington 3200 competition trap. 30" split vent rib barrels. All original, no modifications, no scratches, no dings, selective external pull/pull triggers, full/full chokes. Engraved dogs on both sides. If interested send a PM or click the above URL for more details. $1,995.















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Bob, if you take a look at this post I made you will see that the 3200's that have been updated will have 2 allen head screws at the bottom of the breech face. If this has not been done, the buyer is looking at about $700 of repairs at Laib's to get a 3200 back to safe use. As said before, a pic of the breech face would clear this up.
Doug Allison
 

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It looks to me that this gun is the later model. It has an upper, and lower pin in the receiver, as to secure the tangs. The early models only had the top pin, that need the update, eventually, to save your wood from cracking.

After talking to Laib's gunsmith the issue is the movement between the lower, and upper tangs. This in turn puts different pressures on the wood against the receiver instead of the end of the tangs at the bolt. This causes the wood to crack. The forend update is for the same reasons. Reinforcing. It is not really a safety issue unless the gun has been shot very much to the point that the two tangs are moving severely. This is because the two tangs have trigger parts connected to them, and need to keep their tolerances.

This gun is in pretty good shape, and does not look like it was shot much.
 

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The gun in not unsafe to use without the updates as far as I know. Remington did the update to the action in an attempt to prevent the stock from cracking at the tang area. I have a first year model that has not had the updates dones, but has had the tang glass bedded and the wood relieved a few thousands around the radius of the tang. When I talked to Laib's, an employee told me that if the stock hadn't split by now it probably never would.

I have attached a picture of the inside of the action to show the what it will look like with the updates.

Notice the two allen head screws below and to each side of the lower firing pin. Those indicate the strut between the upper and lower tang has been installed and the lower tang is now held in place by the two allen screws instead of a cross pin thru the action.





 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi guys, thanks very much for all the info. I've talked to Remington and they claim that if the OU is in front of the serial numbers no upgrades are necessary. But, he referenced an article by Pat Laib. So I called Pat who agrees with y'all, if the hex screws show the update has been done. However, he asked how much the gun will be fired, if moderate no problems should develop, if a lot the work should probably done @ $450.
My gun has been fired very little and is in great shape. Checking for hex screws and a dot between the OU and serial number I found none.
 

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Robert Hartman I believe all the guns had the OU in front of the serial numbers with the exception of the 100 or so engraved and gold inlayed in Europe for sale on the European market and the One of Fifty that were engraved and gold inlayed in Europe and destined for the American market. The updated models had a dot placed in between the OU and the serial numbers on the model that were not engraved with gold inlays. Anyone with a punch and hammer could put the dot in the serial number if they wanted to be dishonest. The allen screws are a more dependable way to tell if the updates were done to the action. I believe all the European engraved models were updated before they were put on the market.
 

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OldFan is right.

Also, Competitions had the gold-filled word "COMPETITION" in a gold-filled banner on each side of the receiver, a unique checkering pattern with an unchecked band through each panel, checkering on the triangular flat areas between the stock's wrist and the receiver, engraving on the forend latch plate and (if I recall my gun correctly) a solid brown recoil pad instead of a ventilated one. Also, I'm pretty sure they had Remington's "satin" wood finish instead of RKW gloss - at least mine did.

They made 3200 traps in three grades, "Trap," "Special Trap" and "Competition." Bob's appears to be one of the first two.

Ed
 

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My dad was a Director at Remington when the 3200 was introduced (and the recall was announced). He was told that the recall was triggered by "cowboys" who snap closed the gun with one hand.
 
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