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I back to trap after a 35 year layoff. I've never shot register, but hope to change that next spring. So what will I do and expect?

Do I start as a AAA or is there an unclassified class.

Is there a minimum number of targets to shoot to get classified?

Can you clarify some terms, such as "lewis money" or "money added"? Is the payout just for overall or broken down to classes?

anything else you think I need to know?

thanks
Rich Stone
 

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You can DL the rulebook here. ATA Bylaws, Rulebook, & Forms
It will explain alot. Classification is up to the particular classifir at a shoot. Normally, new members start as D class, 20yd HCP.
Lewis class is a payout based on percentages. Money added is usually extra money added to the pot by a sponser (as opposed to participants.) Hope this helps.
 

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At smaller club shoots, you will normally start at Class B in singles, Class C in doubles, and be placed at the 20 yard line or so. At larger shoots, the shoot program will determine your class and yardage (penalty) until you have a minimum number of targets (that number will be in the program). After you have around a thousand targets, you will be classified based on your average at smaller shoots. Your handicap yardage is all about shooting straight - scores of 96 and above will get you moved further back

Added money is prize money put up by the shoot host and will be shared as stated in the program. All shooters entered are eligible for added money. Lewis money is one of the many "options". You pay extra to be part of the Lewis. You are not required to enter the Lewis or any other option. Lewis Class is a way of dividing money AFTER the scores are in. A simplified example of Lewis class - One hundred shooters in the event and 4 lewis classes. The top score gets 25%, then drop down 25 scores and that shooter gets 25%, drop down 25 more and that shooter gets 25% and then the leader of the bottom 25 shooters also gets paid. Many clubs offer a modified lewis where the top 2 scores get xx % and the 3rd score becomes the first lewis class winner. There is an excellent booklet on options called Trap Options by the Scattergun Press. Worth buying.

Most of all, I would go to the ATA website and download a copy of rules and familiarize yourself with them. Do not listen to others regardless of how loud they are. Most trapshooters do not bother reading the rules. For extra fun, I would subscribe to Trap and Field. You will be able to keep track of big shoots and be able to find shoots near your location.

Have Fun!!
 

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My answer is a bit different. On the day of the registered shoot, show up at opening or about mid morning. Go to the registration area, let them qualify to as to classification and sign up on a squad of singles. Choose any station except 1. Pay your money and get your stuff ready. usually the field/trap assignments are posted on a door. Walk up behind that trap and watch the targets for a few minutes. That tells you the target height you will need to adjust to and it will show you how they move from station to station. the squad leader watches the shooter move from 5 to 1 in order to make sure he is ready to shoot when his time is called. The the squad leader begins when the fellow that makes the walk across the field from 5 to 1. Shoot and do the best you can.

If you shot to your satisfaction, head back to sign up area and sign yourself up for a handicap squad. Unless you are at a big shoot, you will begin at the 20 yard line. But the process of shooting is the same as for the singles. Shoot the handicap from the 20 yard line the same as you did on the 16 yard line. the sight picture is pretty much the same.

When done with that, wait around and watch a group shoot doubles. Adn my advice to yo is to shoot some doubles practice before you go for it at a registered event.

the first registered shoot is a tad daunting. In my case I had a case of the "nerves" all during my first year.

If you want to play options, choose the "Lewis" class initially. Adn In a moment of downtime, have some one explain it to you "roughly". Don't get bogged down in the minutia. Lewis is mostly the same everywhere, but the explanation on how it works varies from shooter to shooter. Adn many do not know.

And lastly, you have as much of a chance to do well as you would not so well. Adn come on back after the shoot, get on your TS.com, tell us about it and we will help you make the next step up the ladder of ATA success.
 

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A lot of good info above. I would take exception to one point. While it is true an average able bodied male shooter will officially start at the 20 yd. line,I know a couple of small clubs who penalize with added yardage if you do not have a certain number of targets but, even if they do the required number at the smaller clubs is usually small. It is allowable under ATA rules But, They must advertise it. If so it should be in their program. Not a big deal to worry about. Once you get some targets under your belt it won't matter. I wouldn't play options at first (unless maybe the Lewis) which is mainly luck of the draw except the top score. Just concentrate of getting targets. I also wouldn't shoot lead off for awhile. After you get some shoots in it will feel a lot more routine. Welcome back to trap and to the ATA.
 
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