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I'm looking for output from Dry Fire owners whether you think it is a worth while investment. Also, what you think of the product and whether you think it helped you shoot better. I'm considering a dual head unit should I go ahead and get a system.
Thanks, Dave..
 

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I'm looking for output from Dry Fire owners whether you think it is a worth while investment. Also, what you think of the product and whether you think it helped you shoot better. I'm considering a dual head unit should I go ahead and get a system.
Thanks, Dave..
I currently own a Dry Fire system I used it several times and it was great. Unfortunately I suffered from a hand injury and cannot
hold the shotgun properly. I'm considering selling the unit. Again it was a very useful tool especially off season.
If you have any question regarding the system just PM
Joe
 

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I was disappointed, and ultimately sold my dual head Dry Fire system. The system itself is too 'gimmicky' for my taste, had some service issues which were not satisfactorily resolved, and produces questionable feedback. Practice mounting the gun, moving your eyes than the gun, and following through is helpful - regardless of the practice technique that is being used. If a Dry Fire system will make you practice more often, go for it. I prefer Terry Jordan's wall chart for practicing. Send me a PM if you would like to discuss details.

Good luck!
 

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I truly believe that Terry Jordan's wall chart does what you need to practice on. The key is to move your eyes to the target before moving the gun, then getting the gun to your focal point, pulling the trigger, and following through with your head on the gun. If this becomes routine, it really does not make a difference if the target is actually moving or not. As long as you are doing what you need to be doing, focusing on the target through the shot and following through, movement is irrelevant. Timing will come naturally. At a $1000 cheaper or more, I think the extra money should be spent on practice of actual shooting, and that will make you better than any electronic simulation could do, IMO.

Problem is that Terry's chart can become monotonous, because you don't know the results. It truly takes dedication of getting better. If you are serious, and take the time to do the chart right, and take it serious enough to the point of making it as real a situation to actual trap as you can, it will make a difference. I think it is the best investment you can make in this game for the money, and I am serious about that. I mean what, around $150. It will do more than a new choke tube. It really helps you gain focus on the target before you pull the trigger, and seems to slow the process down, even though when live, it does not seem any different. It exercises your eyes to focus faster, and then the rest of the process becomes routine.

I know this will cause some dissension, but I really believe that if done long and often enough, it will help with flinching also. Reason being is, because your focus is allowed the full attention without recoil, that routine takes over the mind when actually firing live rounds. Will the flinch come back, probably. Just have to keep the chart practice up until it is routine, and matter overpowers the mind.

By the way, I have seen people that come over for gun visiting, that I tell to take a try on the chart, damn near fall over when pulling the trigger with a snap cap. They never realized that they were reacting that way to the trigger pull until then. A real eye opener.

I don't know Terry Jordan, and I have not shot a Dry Fire System. This is just my experience. Not putting Dry Fire down, just looking at logic, that is all.

Update: Edited wording so as not to imply Dry Fire was a video game.
 
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I have had both the single head and dual head, at different times. I would go with the dual head if you intend to practice doubles. They're not for the timid or uneducated for sure, to properly set one up takes a lot of work. Dryfire Bob was very helpful with questions and one service issue which he promptly resolved. This is not a video game. Gun setup, no, barrel setup is critical to success. I use mine all winter. AAA27AA

ps: the only thing different is the recoil, my wife offered to slap me during each shot but I declined.
 

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I've had two systems. They will increase your speed dramatically, and eye to target focus. But, to really utilize them you still have to shoot. Use it a couple of days then shoot real targets. There is no compensation for recoil in the machine. I think I shot my best using the machine in conjunction with real shooting on a regular basis. But, they do get boring, you have to be disciplined.
 

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I've had two systems. They will increase your speed dramatically, and eye to target focus. But, to really utilize them you still have to shoot. Use it a couple of days then shoot real targets. There is no compensation for recoil in the machine. I think I shot my best using the machine in conjunction with real shooting on a regular basis. But, they do get boring, you have to be disciplined.
This is spot on!

Use it, then shoot some live rounds.

My son uses it on a regular basis (twice a week during week) then on weekends shoots at the club or registered shoots. He has commented that it has really made his swing a smoother move to the target rather than a snap to target. A few weeks ago he shot 200 rounds on the dry fire. 94 and a 95. He than went to a registered shoot the next day. Shot a 95/93.

Obviously he would rather shoot live targets but in the mean time when its crappy out he is still swinging.
 

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RutabagaDave, I've used the Dry Fire (old and new versions). The system works as advertised but a few things to consider. This a serious training tool with some shot analysis built in. You need to take the time to set it up correctly. Follow the instruction and get the physical layout correct then enter the measurement information into the Dry Fire set-up file. You'll need to enter measurements from your gun barrel, length, point of impact, cartridge, shot size, speed and choke selection. Once set-up "shooting" is simple. I found it a good training tool and it allowed me to "shoot indoors" during the off-season. You can practice one specific target or just shoot a round. Some of the training features I like are variable winds, setting the target speed and the hit report for each shot. Take a look at the Dry Fire website. I found it to be very helpful for me to analyze individual shots and as a "shooting" supplement. It does not eliminate shooting real targets at the range. If you would like more info please PM me. Good Luck with whatever training tool you select.
Gavin
 

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Does the DryFire setup factor in lead somehow? Most of the sims I've seen just indicated hits if the projected target was pointed at, not the point ahead of the target required on real birds.
 

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jlmccuan,
Yes. The Dry Fire calculates the point of impact of the shot cloud, shot string. When you set-up the Dry Fire amongst other things you enter the shell speed, pellet size and choke.
Good Shooting
Gavin
 

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I have a single head system. Excellent information about your shot, distance,speed, how it was hit, where it was hit. It saves the rounds for review. Some issues I have are: They give you very little time to get your gun up for test pattern. I had trouble with the laser loosening up and centering. The 34" barrel plus choke is pretty long, they barely give enough cable to reach the end. When I switched to a release it was easy to do but setting the trigger is releasing a bird. All and all a great tool. Dave T.
 

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I have a single head old design unit but the old laptop that I had quit working and I could never get it to work with the newer laptop. Mine is the old design and it is no longer supported. I have contacted Bob to see if they could update it so I could use it again but they no longer use any of the parts from the old unit so now it is in a bag in the basement. To bad I always enjoyed using it and I think they do help when you can't get out to shoot real targets. Good Luck
 

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I'm looking for output from Dry Fire owners whether you think it is a worth while investment. Also, what you think of the product and whether you think it helped you shoot better. I'm considering a dual head unit should I go ahead and get a system.
Thanks, Dave..
I currently own a dual head system. I used it several times and it was great. Due to the Sandy Storm my basement got destroyed and I can't set it up, NO SPACE. If you are interested I'm willing to sell it at a very reasonable price. It kills me to see it just laying around.
 

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I currently own a dual head system. I used it several times and it was great. Due to the Sandy Storm my basement got destroyed and I can't set it up, NO SPACE. If you are interested I'm willing to sell it at a very reasonable price. It kills me to see it just laying around.

I am interested in a dry fire system. If you could call me at 715 299 8748 it would be appreciated
 

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...Problem is that Terry's chart can become monotonous, because you don't know the results....
I know the results, I shoot 100 every time I shoot the wall chart, never a miss, not one single miss.
It simply helps one develop an eye to clay relationship. Eye, clay, trigger.
 
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