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I'm at a point where I'm not sure exactly what to do. I'm not sure if my less than acceptable scores lately are a direct result of the cold, of not shooting/practicing enough during the cold months, or that I just suck and can't shoot anymore.

When it comes to dry firing how much is enough every day. How many times a day should I be dry firing? I would assume the law of diminishing returns would apply to this situation? So, how many times per day is enough and what is the relationship between dry fire practice and scores?
 

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I don't know if you even need to "Dry fire". Here's my old comment. It's called Mental imagery or Visualization and Mental Rehearsal to Improve Sports Performance. With mental rehearsal, minds and bodies become trained to actually perform the skill imagined. You actualy can develop muscle memory doing this without spending money. Research is finding that both physical and psychological reactions in certain situations can be improved with visualization. Such repeated imagery can build both experience and confidence in an athlete's ability to perform certain skills under pressure, or in a variety of possible situations. The most effective visualization techniques result in a very vivid sport experience in which the athlete has complete control over a successful performance and a belief in this new 'self.'

Guided imagery, visualization, mental rehearsal or other such techniques can maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your training. In a world where sports performance and success is measured in seconds, most athletes will use every possible training technique at hand. Visualization might be one way to gain that very slim margin. (And save money!) When I was trying to win the big one I spent 30 minutes a day in mental practice and 15-30 minutes dry firing or bringing my gun up and tracking along the wall/ceiling with a laser in the end of the barrel. AJ
 

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If you want to become good at shooting at stationary targets, shoot at pictures on a poster or plates on the wall.

If you want to become good at shooting at things that move, shoot at things that move.

MK
 

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I keep a shooting log. It helps ride out the ups and downs. I have gone into "funks" where my score swing wildly. Could be many things. From my logs, I can tell I start spring badly, peak about May/Jun, slump July/Aug, come roaring back in Sept/OCt for the start of the winter league, then my scores go to hell in Nov/Dec. There are also up/downs durning the months too.

Dry firing at home has not worked for me. Have tried it for two years, and I quickly lose interest. Perhaps its because I love the outdoors even in the cold winter months and even when I shoot badly.

Good luck.
 
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