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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Do you shoot them quickly and smoothly then accuracy will come?
or
more deliberately and speed will come?

I feel it's quickly and smoothly then accuracy,
Am I really learning anything from shooting a falling 2nd bird?

EDIT: The title used to read "Paging Sean Hawley". I was was attempting to be funny. If Sean wants to throw in some advice that would be excellent, however I'm confident there are many good doubles shooters that can help.
 

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The general advice is to be aggressive on the first target. Don't dwell on the break, and move your eyes immediately to the second target. The gun will follow.

People see good doubles shooters shooting quickly and think, "Wow! Shooting them fast is where it's at."

A good (great) doubles shooter isn't "shooting" them fast, they are seeing them fast.

Set up so that there is little movement to the first bird, get your eyes on the second as quickly as possible, and "speed" will happen.

It takes time, and practice. Lots of practice.

Don't try to shoot them faster than you can see them.
 

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Shoot the first one first and the second one second. That's a good place to start but not as good as Leo Harrison's DVD.
Hawley shoots doubles as good as anyone ever has and better than most, but he does it a little different. You have to see what works for you.

Jeff
 

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When I shoot doubles I like to shoot the first bird using my left eye and the second bird using my right eye.
That method helps me shoot them fast. HMB
 

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Do you shoot them quickly and smoothly then accuracy will come?
or
more deliberately and speed will come?

I feel it's quickly and smoothly then accuracy,
Am I really learning anything from shooting a falling 2nd bird?

EDIT: The title used to read "Paging Sean Hawley". I was was attempting to be funny. If Sean wants to throw in some advice that would be excellent, however I'm confident there are many good doubles shooters that can help.
Remember one thing. You can look darn pretty styling and profiling when shooting doubles. But your going to be severely lacking in efficiency if you get to the target with an empty gun.
 

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It would appear that some trap shooters have very small brains and are easily confused,
when it comes to the finer points of shooting doubles. HMB
 

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When I shoot doubles I like to shoot the first bird using my left eye and the second bird using my right eye.
That method helps me shoot them fast. HMB
HMB, you've made this statement numerous times on this forum about shooting doubles. So, are you saying that you close your right eye for the first target and your left eye for the second? That is the only way I can see this happening unless you've had an optirectumy. I apologize in advance for being skeptical.
 

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Over the years I have seen the person that goes by the handle HMB give advise as he has above. I'm not near the doubles shooter I once was at 79 years old but at least I know that I have shot very well in my younger years (early fiftys) and I don't hide behind a name like HMB so that no one can check my averages over the years, why is that ? I know of no one that shoots with a skeet choke as he says he does either. I have had my guns chokes by the best gunsmiths of our times, Tom Seitz liked .020 for the first shot and .030 for the second shot, on the Beretta he did for me. Tom Wilkinson did my K-80 trap special with no screw in chokes, he likes .017 for the first shot and .027 for the second shot. Both nearly the same, and both shot very, very well.

HMB show us some proof of how your method works, by letting us know your name so we can check for ourselves. Your advise I believe hurts new shooters that are looking for honest help.


Tom Strunk
 

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I'd give you sum advice and my name too but if I did you wouldn't want to take my advice much.

Heck, I shouldn't even consider shooting dblas at all!! After many buckos spent on trying to get mine fixed from fan-firing, I'm leary of twin shots, that's why I only shoot at one quail ata time!! LOL

HAP
 

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Doubles isn't hard but like anything else it takes time and targets to get the muscle memory as well as train the brain. Just remember eyes 1st!!! I teach my kids to see the 1st bird and move to it and shoot. This part is easy as the target is always in the same general spot. No good excuse for not breaking all the 1st birds. Don't spot/trap the target, just see it and move to it, as soon as you see the break move your eyes 1st(not your head or body) to lock on to the second target. As long as you have a solid gun mount and you are swinging from the feet & knees you will naturally swing the gun in a controlled manor to the bird and shoot it. When you 1st start this will seem and be slow, the speed will come as you gain experience and learn to see the birds sooner. Just remember eyes 1st. You must always swing in a controlled manor. Once you panic or arm swing it is all over.

One exercise I have them do to learn to get the eyes on the target 1st (without moving the head) is stand behind shooters during practice, or even back on the side walk but behind them on the post. Watch for the 1st bird as soon as you see it break, move your eyes, keeping your head still, lock on to the second bird and watch it till it breaks or lands. I also have them do this on the line as they are shooting. This will train the brain faster and get the muscle memory programed faster as well. This works regardless of being one eyed or two.

If you see and lock on to the bird, it can bounce, jump, be raising on falling and you will still break it. Just lock the eyes on the bird, it really is that easy.

Eyes First!!!
Know just relax, get out there and just have fun!!!
 

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AAtrap,
I shoot with both eyes open. On that first shot of doubles I hold a level gun above the house. I look under the gun
with my left eye in order to see the bird come out of the house when I call for the bird. As soon as I see the
target I pull the trigger and move to the second target. I shoot the second bird with my right eye. HMB
 

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Ok, I give up. Please do as Tom Strunk mentioned above and post your name so we can check your doubles scores . Maybe then, some of your advice can be taken seriously.

Have a great day
Steve Elliott
 

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I like what V10 has in his post. Where each individual picks up focus on the bird is going to be different for everyone. Although I am not sure with the first bird there really is a very clear focus on the bird with the right eye, of a right handed shooter. This is only about the two eyed shooter of course.

While I know people say they don't spot shoot, or line up their gun with the path of the first bird, I believe that is key to hitting the first target. You have to at least hold very close to where that first target is going to be, when broken. Watch videos of people shooting doubles and you will see this, even though they say they are not spot shooting. I believe you have to take advantage of knowing that first targets path, to hit it with little gun movement.

Now, I do not shoot ATA doubles targets, but was taught by a person that shot doubles very well, the late Gary Schaetzel. Also, what HMB is describing I believe is very close to the visual process that is happening, IMO, with the two eyed shooter of doubles. The first bird is really more about timing, than actual focus of both eyes on the target, because the gun is blocking the dominant eyes vision of the target. The second bird however is all about focus on the bird, with both eyes.

I can't imagine trying to shoot doubles with one eye would even be possible to spot shoot the first target. I believe that if you are a two eyed shooter, eventually you are going to be lined up to the point very closely resembling a spot shooter. Either way the timing of shooting doubles targets is a developed process only achieved with practice.
 
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