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"Another technique for reducing recoil is the lengthening of the forcing cones in the barrels of your gun. Much of the felt recoil from a shotgun is due to friction and pressure created in the five inches forward of the chambers. It is in this area of each barrel, called the forcing cone, where the wad and shot are forced to transition from the wider diameter of the chamber to the narrower diameter of the barrel. Forcing cones that have a steeper transition will produce greater recoil. Barrels with a more gradual transition will produce less felt recoil."
Don Currie is NSCA’s Chief Instructor, an Orvis Wingshooting School instructor, and Master Class competitor.

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"Another technique for reducing recoil is the lengthening of the forcing cones in the barrels of your gun. Much of the felt recoil from a shotgun is due to friction and pressure created in the five inches forward of the chambers. It is in this area of each barrel, called the forcing cone, where the wad and shot are forced to transition from the wider diameter of the chamber to the narrower diameter of the barrel. Forcing cones that have a steeper transition will produce greater recoil. Barrels with a more gradual transition will produce less felt recoil."
Don Currie is NSCA’s Chief Instructor, an Orvis Wingshooting School instructor, and Master Class competitor.

Does this sound right?
long forcing cones produce less recoil than short ones, but they do it by producing less velocity. long forcing cones remove more metal out of the barrel just in front of the shell chamber. This gives extra space available there, so when the shot charge clears the forcing cone area, the high pressure charge of exploded powder now has more room than it had if the forcing cones were not made longer, and this gives more space there. With this extra space available, all that burnt high pressure powder suddenly has more space to fill up. Having more space than with the shorter forcing cones, at this point the pressure drops below what is found with the shorter cones. So having pressure lower right after the forcing cones also results in getting less velocity. This reduction in velocity results in less recoil. So longer forcing cones give less recoil, but you could have accomplished the same thing by just using a tiny bit less powder.
 

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they say smoother transition into the bore less deformation of the individual pellets, softer set back, better patterns, more feet per second, makes sense, sounds good, why not have it if it is available, that's what Browning says with the inv plus and the Vector bores in their shotguns, it is a multi-million dollar industry, why not say it.
 

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The Beretta DT11 Trap with the Steelium Pro barrels have 22" forcing cones. For those who own this gun or has shot it some, have you noticed a reductions if perceived recoil?
 

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Gun club porch talk. Hearsay.

Because it's subjective and the people who have their forcing cones extended will of course insist it works because if it didn't, they just wasted hundreds of dollars.

long forcing cones produce less recoil than short ones, but they do it by producing less velocity.
The claim that it reduces recoil because it reduces muzzle velocity is also dubious because the amount can change the muzzle velocity is most likely within the range of expected muzzle velocities of a box of factory shells. I tested 5 Winchester Universal cartridges when I first got the pressure test gun and they ranged from 1169 fps to 1203 fps. Most people (read that as everybody) wouldn't be able to discern such a miniscule difference, shot to shot. How much is a lengthened forcing cone going to reduce your muzzle velocity? Less than that? If so, how on earth could you tell there's a difference?

they say smoother transition into the bore less deformation of the individual pellets, softer set back, better patterns, more feet per second
One guy says more muzzle velocity, another says less. Which is it?

The answer is, NOBODY KNOWS BECAUSE NOBODY HAS TESTED THAT HYPOTHESIS. They just believe what old Joe at the club says because he's a good shooter and he oughta know.

The claim that it offers "less deformation of the individual pellets, softer set back, better patterns" is dubious because again, NOBODY TESTS THAT HYPOTHESIS.

Except that ONE GUY.

Of course, Neil Winston DID. He did it with a Remington 870 barrel that he had. The result? Not a darn bit of difference. But, but, but, that's only one gun! True. But it provides ACTUAL EVIDENCE. Which nobody else provides.

So until I see someone take 10 different guns with short forcing cones, patterns them to the level of detail done by Neil, then have the forcing cones extended, then more patterning under the same conditions as the first test, and the results show that there is a statistically significant improvement to the patterns, comparing before and after, the answer is, it doesn't make a hill of beans worth of difference.

 

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How do they do that, and what is your evidence?
I had a Ljutic Dyna Trap backboard many years ago. Seemed to make it feel softer. I know it shouldn't actually change the moment of inertia (or whatever it's called), but could possible spread it out or reduce the abruptness. Sort of like the difference between Red Dot and Longshot maybe. It's been a long time since I had to do any of those kinds of equations. You might ask WICheeezHead.

Have a great day!
 

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I had a Ljutic Dyna Trap backboard many years ago. Seemed to make it feel softer. I know it shouldn't actually change the moment of inertia (or whatever it's called), but could possible spread it out or reduce the abruptness. Sort of like the difference between Red Dot and Longshot maybe. It's been a long time since I had to do any of those kinds of equations. You might ask WICheeezHead.

Have a great day!
Most people (read that as everyone) can't tell the difference between slow powders and fast powders.

Because most people (read that as everyone) don't even perceive recoil until the shot/wad is halfway to the target.
 

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I never felt good about reaming out metal if the barrel wasn’t designed that way. If a gun is manufactured with long forcing cones that’s ok. Beretta is doing that, but I haven’t felt a noticeable decrease in recoil.
 

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Richard P. Feynman, Professor of Theoretical Physics at the California Institute of Technology; Albert Einstein Award (1954, Princeton) and The Nobel Prize in Physics, 1965, Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!
“The first principle is that you must not fool yourself — and you are the easiest person to fool.”

Forcing Cone lengthening, Yes or No
 
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