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Discussion Starter #1
any thoughts or opinions on the Dillon SL 900 , good or bad, I am almost positive I have had too much of the blue cool aid to turn back now.
 

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Well I've had mine now for nearly 4 years now and I wouldn't trade it for anything. Go check out our Powerfactor Show episodes for a few reviews.
 

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Love mine, but am concerned about the way it primes, but not too anal about it. I have heard it may, emphasis on "may" cause basewads to become dislodged on some of those euro hulls and the old Federal TG hulls with the way the claws pull on the rim while the primer is pushed in, so I just use it for Rem Gunclubs only, and I am cookin' with butter on those.
 

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Works well for me, $1100 including the hull auto feeder was the best deal I could find a few years ago. Keep EVERYTHING lubed as instructed in the manual. As with any precision tool/machine, inspect it regularly.
The primer drop system has a stop adjustment next to the shell plate that is very critical to its operation. The wad guide also has a set screw for alignment adjustment that has to be set just right. It'll take some getting used to. If you jerk the handle too much, the new hull being fed may jump out of place.
 

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I really like my Dillon. The time it takes to final tune the machine are sometimes difficult and hard to get at to the adjustments. When you get every thing correct for your load it is worth the learning curve with some disappointments getting there.
When you find the load stick with it and you will have a mini factory assembly line of high quality product.
I think a correctly tuned SL-900 is worth the money, I have tried many brands and this is the setup I am sticking with.
 

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I would download the Dillon SL900 manual and also look at the U-tube video on the loader,this will give you an insight ,on what to expect?
 

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I've been using mine for about 20 years. I've replaced a few plastic parts and springs (free). It stills works perfect and I've owned a Spolar and PW800+, as well as a Pacific 366 and a bunch of Mec's. I still have a Mec Grabber for my 28ga. I really like the compound leverage and short stroke on the Dillon, as well as the automatic shell feed. No powder or shot drops without a shell in that station...very good. Once you get use to the stroke the primers flow like water. A great machine that I've reloaded a 100,000 +++ shells with.
 

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I've had mine about 6 months and LOVE it.. The fine adjustments allow you to get the shell EXACTLY the way you want it. Start off slow and learn the FEEL of the machine. If you're herky jerky, you can screw up the primer drop. But once you get used to the feel, you'll know if you seated a primer or not. Remember, "slow is smooth and smooth is fast". I can now easily knock out 500 rounds an hour. And that's not pushing it. Keep an eye out for used ones on this site or shotgun world. I got mine for $800 shipped and it looks brand new. About a month later I saw another and my buddy picked it up, $850 shipped. Both had the hull feeder, a must, and both in like new condition. Good luck. You won't be sorry.
 

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I've been very pleased with mine. I've had it about 2.5 months now and have loaded around 10,000 rounds with it. There's a small learning curve to it, but I'd you're smart enough to follow a reloading table you're smart enough to learn the machine. I haven't had any problems with the primer assembly. I added an aftermarket spent primer tube. That's been so nice. I can easily do 100 rounds in about 7 minutes. Last night I loaded 1000 rounds in about 1.5 hrs total time and didn't have a single problem.

The biggest lesson I had to learn was not putting a wad in when there wasn't a hull for it to be seated in. The wad will still cause a shot drop that then spills all over the table and machine :)

I HIGHLY recommend the low powder alarm because when you're really cranking em out, you can run it right out of powder.

Alex
 

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To me the biggest drawback is the adjustable powder and shot measures.
They say when making a change to drop several charges to settle the machine before
you start weighing them. So if you miss the weight you want you readjust and drop several
more and weigh again. If you miss again you have to repeat until you get what you want.
I solved that by buying two extra powder measures and one extra shot measure.
I used it until I started have shoulder and elbow trouble. I bought a Spolar with
hydraulic and sold the Dillon.
Bud
 

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According to the u-tube video's,making a change in the die adjustments can be a problem trying to get a wrench and room to adjust the die's on top,it is probably because the 900Sl,was built on a 650 Dillon frame and things get confined more,this could be
a problem for folks,that reload lots of different shells and need to make changes fairly often [ like me].The roller handle and shell feeder are a plus to this unit.I have a Spolar powerload hydraulic,that I purchased in 1991 and have used it on different ,loaders
and it still runs like a champ,although it is noisier than the newer models,I have often wondered,at times how much my arms and shoulders were save by using this method?
 

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According to the u-tube video's,making a change in the die adjustments can be a problem trying to get a wrench and room to adjust the die's on top,it is probably because the 900Sl,was built on a 650 Dillon frame and things get confined more,this could be
a problem for folks,that reload lots of different shells and need to make changes fairly often [ like me].The roller handle and shell feeder are a plus to this unit.I have a Spolar powerload hydraulic,that I purchased in 1991 and have used it on different ,loaders
and it still runs like a champ,although it is noisier than the newer models,I have often wondered,at times how much my arms and shoulders were save by using this method?
So your saying that you have to tune it per given load you want to use?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I got the Dillon in and have spent all day trying to get it up and running. every die had to have some adjusting [ not that hard to get to them ] but aggravating still. since they are supposed to be set up for 1 1/8 oz loads with AA hulls and that is what I have . In all fairness to Dillon part of my problems may be the old shot . I will lube it with graphite when I get some . till then I may try to molly coat some of it and see if it drops a consistent shot charge. Powder charge was no problem except the die was smashing the hull and had to be backed out a full round to stop that. I weighed the shot on every round so I could get the pre-crimp and final crimp adjusted correctly. hopefully the graphite or molly coating the shot will help the inconsistent shot charges. Dillon has been helpful but and I am sure I will be calling them in the future . lubing the shot is my last hope
 

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My Dillon required very little adjustment from the factory. I did have to turn in (down) the pre crimp die and back out the powder die about one turn each. If one can't do that on this press, I really wonder if he should be reloading :) I can run AA and Nitro hulls through it without problems. It has always dropped very consistent powder and shot charges. I find it easy to change from my loads to my buddy's in about ten minutes max. I reload 1oz loads with Red Dot and he reloads 7/8oz with Titewad. It's handled W209, CCI, Fed209A, and Noble sport primers without any hiccups.

I love mine and will continue to use the snot out of it. It stays true and adjusted all the time. :)

Alex
 

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Oh yeah, LDP, if you ever need help learning about your Dillon, shoot me a PM. I can call ya and walk ya through it. I've learned a few tricks that might help ya out :)

Alex
 

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I got the Dillon in and have spent all day trying to get it up and running. every die had to have some adjusting [ not that hard to get to them ] but aggravating still. since they are supposed to be set up for 1 1/8 oz loads with AA hulls and that is what I have . In all fairness to Dillon part of my problems may be the old shot . I will lube it with graphite when I get some . till then I may try to molly coat some of it and see if it drops a consistent shot charge. Powder charge was no problem except the die was smashing the hull and had to be backed out a full round to stop that. I weighed the shot on every round so I could get the pre-crimp and final crimp adjusted correctly. hopefully the graphite or molly coating the shot will help the inconsistent shot charges. Dillon has been helpful but and I am sure I will be calling them in the future . lubing the shot is my last hope
Don't lube the shot. Wash it in a rock tumbler, dry in the sun on a screen, then a little graphite in a shell tumbler. The shot is glued (sticking, dirty) together and bridging in the Dillon.
 

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Just a comment.
I have owned mine for about 3 years. There is a definite learning curve, you need to give your self time to get used to the machine for sure . Once I learned how to operate it as well as its hiccups it is a very impressive and fast machine. Also you can not beat Dillon's No BS parts policy with free shipping .Just my 2 cents Optima
 
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