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So what's your story? What was the most unusual hunt you can remember?

For me, it was opening day of dove season in 2006 or 2007. I was with a bunch of friends in eastern North Carolina, hunting over a recently picked cornfield. A hurricane was headed toward us but we thought we could get in some shooting before the rain arrived. An outer band of the storm arrived earlier than expected and the wind and rain began. The doves must have known it would get worse so they came in to feed by the hundreds. We shot from the lee of an old barn, trying to stay dry. The worse the weather got, the more doves arrived. I guess they knew it was time to eat before they had to seek shelter. Someone in the group went to a nearby friend's house and returned with a bunch of plastic trash bags which we cut holes in and used as raincoats. As the wind gusted higher, doves flying into it were slow, easy targets. Those flying with the wind must have been doing over a hundred mph.

We finally had to call it quits but everybody got a limit (at least). And everybody got soaked but had a ball.
 

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About 48 years ago me and two of my friends went out to jump shoot some ducks, it was in November and the waterfowl, dove, quail and pheasant seasons were all open.

We ended up shooting dove, quail, pheasants, ducks and 6 honkers on that day.
 

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A moose hunt in NW MN with my Dad, my uncle, and my stepmom; My dad got a bull on his 50th BD. I had a cow in my scope when he shot, so I put the safety back on, slung the .300 Win. Mag. Ruger 77, and started walking over to him.

A small game hunt that I shot my first goose on (with a Trap load!) stands out also.
 

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I was on a moose/muley/ bear/grouse hunt with my 13 year old son and one of my friends. Before we went into our proposed camp site, we took a detour to check some small ponds that usually held ducks (and were in good muley habitat!).
We parked the truck and walked in to the ponds, but there must have been somebody just before us with the same idea, as the first 4 or 5 had no ducks on them. My friend knew where there was another pond, a little further off the trail, and requiring some hiking, so off we went. There were a few ducks at the far end, so my friend volunteered to walk back there and scare them in out direction.
There was timber almost all the way around the pond, except for in a low area that was a natural overflow channel, so that is where we set up. My son was behind a large log lying on the ground, and I set up about 20 yards behind him behind some scrubby bushes. We heard our friend shouting, then more shouting, then in a minute a shot. We watched the ducks take off from the pond, going like hell down the length of the pond and heading generally in our direction. I was thinking "Duck dinner!", but the flock turned left before the timber and circled back, all except one little black bugger that turned right and came right at the log my son was hiding behind, about 40 feet up and climbing for all it was worth. My son stuck his head up just in time to see it almost directly above him, so he threw his gun up, and I'm sure he pulled the trigger before it hit his shoulder, pointing almost straight up.
As so often happens when it's a kid shooting, he was so excited that he wasn't sure if the gun was on his shoulder, but he said the duck was well above the barrel so he shot it.
It folded and flopped to the ground about 15-20 feet behind him, with most of its head missing. A great first shot on his first duck, but it was the nastiest tasting duck I've ever tasted, so I told my son that I wouldn't deprive him of the pleasure of eating his first duck all by himself.
We got lots of grouse, but no moose or muleys, and I shot a VERY nice black bear in a berry patch, that is hanging on the wall behind me as I type this.
 

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Back when there were enough wild bobwhite quil to hunt (1980's), I and a friend went hunting. It was the first time I had ever hunted this particular farm.
I had a fairly young ( 1 1/2 yearold dog that had a very good nose on him. He came by it naturally since his daddy was an English pointer and his momma was an English setter. He worked, pointed, honored, retrieved and minded very well. He was not hard to train to my style of hunting.
Well, we were working our way to a very birdy looking fence row when all of a sudden Speck locked up on the prettiest point I'd ever seen. He was stock steady. Not moving except that quivering which only meant Birds! Speck never lied about a point. There was always something there! Probably birds but could be a rabbit or a deer or a cow pie but there was always something there.
I asked my buddy if he was ready and he was. I waded in to flush whatever Speck had pointed. My buddy had been asked as I was taught, never shoot anything that is not a quail in front of a bird dog.
So my buddy and I were expecting our first covey rise of the day.
3 wild turkeys exploded from the brush as fast as a quail! We didn't shoot! Speck's belly was on the ground when the birds got up. He looked over his shoulder with eyes as big as Coke bottle bottoms! He had this look on his face like," I'm sure this is a new place to hunt but did you see the size of those birds?"
We didn't see any more turkeys that day but we did get into several coveys of quail!
 

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Here is another hunt I will never forget. I posted it on a Predator Hunting forum.


I decided to go out on a ridge about a half mile below the rancher's house and try a shotgun stand in the thick fog.

I used my camo pillow to lean against and had my Foxpro Fury caller set up about 15 yards in front of me on the grassy ridge. The grass was about 4" high and there was a few small weeds a little bigger than a basketball and that was the only cover other than the fog.

I could see about 30 yards to 50 yards and that was it.

I started out playing Adult Rat sound and after about 5 minutes I switched to Bay Bee Cottontail. A few minutes later I saw a coyote running up the ridge through the fog about 40 yards below me.

When the coyote got to 25 yards or so I shot it with my shotgun. I was using Rem HD Predator T shot loads. The coyote went down but was trying to get up so I shot it again.

Right after shooting the second shot a coyote to my left started screaming some challenges it sounded like it was about 300 yards away. I hit my number 4 preset sound on my Foxpro remote, it is Male Coyote Challenge 4 on volume 40.

The coyote had a screaming contest with my Foxpro for about 30 seconds. I didn't hear the coyote any longer so I muted the sound. About 30 seconds later a coyote appears through the fog and It took me 3 shots to put the coyote down.

A few minutes later another coyote starts barking and huffing not very far away so I switch to Coyote Growls sound on volume 40. This coyote runs right up out of the fog and it takes me 3 more shots to stop this coyote.

I was all excited that I had 3 coyotes down and was digging into my pockets for some more shotgun shells. I didn't have anymore shells with me! You would think 8 shotgun shells should be plenty for one stand.

So I went over and down the ridge to get the third coyote that I had down. When I got to the coyote I realized Coyote Growls was still playing full blast. I tried to mute the caller but the remote didn't work because I was over the side of the ridge and down a little so I couldn't see my Foxpro.

As I was climbing back up to where my Foxpro was with the two other dead coyotes on both sides of it. I heard another coyote that was pretty upset and it was close and running around me in the fog.

I muted the sound and put two of the dead coyotes by my Foxpro. I was seeing the upset coyote circling around in the fog and he was really mad.

It was pretty crazy that this coyote circled me and the 3 dead coyotes about 3 or 4 times. I put the third dead coyote by my camo pillow and headed for my truck to get some more shells.

While I was walking in the fog up towards my truck I could still hear the upset male coyote.

By the time I got to the truck and headed back down the 300 yards to get to my stand I didn't hear the coyote anymore.

I sat down next to the dead coyote by my pillow and started up my Fury that had two dead coyotes next to it about 15 yards from me.

I played Male Coyote Challenge 4, and then coyote growls for about 30 seconds each and did that 2 or 3 times before switching to Coyote Pup Screams on full blast.

About 1 minute later I could just barley see some movement through the fog to my right and it was a coyote. I shot it just as it was disappearing into the fog about 35 yards away.

I took of running that direction because I wasn't sure if I hit it or not. Luckily it was down. This coyote was a huge male for around these parts.
2017-01-14 15.04.13 by , on Flickr
 

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My neighbor has some relatives that live at Coldwater Kansas on a ranch that’s over 22,000 acres. That area is full of big deep ravines that are choked with cedar and hedge. His cousin had a Beefmaster/Brahma cross bull that they hadn’t gathered in several years. The bull had a big set of horns on him that was dragging 2 ropes around them from guys catching him and it getting away. It had crippled a couple horses and would come at you if ever pressured.
The bull disappeared for about a year and then was only seen a few times by some hunters. After deer season one year I went with my neighbor out there to hunt the bull. This thing could hide, was smarter than any mature whitetail and could flatass run like an antelope. After 2 days of getting fooled, fishhooked, outran and outsmarted by this bull we had him located in a big canyon. We took a goose neck trailer load of heifers and put them in a portable pen at the point where the canyon ran into a creek. The morning of day 4 he was standing beside the pen trying to do his business from outside of it. Two 300 mag shots and he was done. Picked him up with a tractor and loader, slut its throat and took it to the local processor to ground into burger. The most elusive big animal that I ever chased. Once again the voodoo punanny was the demise of another male.


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40 years ago Old Joe, my dad, my cousin and I had gone to a desert pond for late afternoon evening dove shooting. We spent 3 hours patiently waiting and might have had 2 or 3 shots a piece. About 10 minutes before sunset the sky turned black from all the doves. When it got to dark to shoot are barrels where glowing. We had never seen so many doves in so short a time. I still haven't.

Al
 
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About 20 years ago I was taking a doe in to have it checked in and processed at the same place. It was dark out and I was about 1/2 mile from my destination when a six pointer ran into the road and I hit it. Deer was dead and didn't look banged up to bad. Called the police to report the accident, got a road kill permit, and dropped them both off at the same time.
 

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I was dove hunting with an older gentleman and watched him kill nine dove over about an hour without ever leaving his stool. The he got up and went out and picked up every one of them without searching. I was, and still am, amazed. These weren't lying on bare ground and they weren't all near each other. JPM
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Good eyes, I guess. I saw an older gentleman do the same thing except he had a bunch of sections of reed of various lengths. After a shot, he would lay a reed on the ground pointing in the direction of the downed bird. The length of the reed roughly corresponded with the distance to the bird.
 

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Most unusual would be gators in Florida. Being out in the swamp, at night, surrounded by glowing gators eyes was exciting to say the least!
 

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I was dove hunting with an older gentleman and watched him kill nine dove over about an hour without ever leaving his stool. The he got up and went out and picked up every one of them without searching. I was, and still am, amazed. These weren't lying on bare ground and they weren't all near each other. JPM
That’s tough to do. I can’t believe how hard it is to find doves sometimes.
 

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A Game Warden in Montana was parked along side a road overlooking a creek. He watched what appeared to be two old duck hunters over a set of decoys. Periodically, some birds came in and the two old timers were very proficient at knocking them down. An old yellow lab waddled out among the decoys, collected the birds and delivered back to the old boys. They were having a really good day (too good in fact) so the warden went down to have a chat.

The warden introduced himself and asked for their licenses. One hunter was 84, the other 87. From the condition of their old Filson and LL Bean jackets, old duck calls with bird bands, and seasoned decoys, it was obvious they knew their way around and had been hunters for a long time. Upon counting the ducks it was apparent that the two had exceeded their limit so the warden had to do his job.

While writing them up the warden became disappointed and chastised the old timers for knowing better. He lectured "Come on Guys. I can tell that you've hunted for a long time and would have expected you to recognize that if everybody did this what would we have left for the next generations?"

The 87 year-old gent replied "Screw em, nobody left us any buffalo!"

This may, or may not be a true story.
 

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I was on stand at the end of this creek bottom at my cousins farm that I always holds deer. I had my 1187 slug gun and we had plenty of tags and the deer just started coming out, one here two there, like that. I just kept shooting and I dropped seven of them. We had snow on the ground at the time and by the time my cousins got to me there’s seven dead deer scattered around and the snow is covered with blood like a murder scene. Every time we make that drive, we bring it up.
 

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When I was about twelve the fish and game planted turkeys in the area so when the first season opened Dad and his quail hunting buddies gave it a try We had noticed during deer hunting that you could drive them like deer. Not knowing any different that’s what we did The first one we saw was from the pickup it flew up in a tree and sat there. One of the hunters was named Earl and to hear my future father in law tell it he took his browning A5 apart changed springs loaded it and shot the turkey. It was a fall hunt and you could take two a day either sex. So my future father in law and myself were dropped off and were to walk up a ridge and the rest were toward the bottom well we walked up on a flock and shot two birds each. The turkeys flushed down to the rest of the hunters and it sounded like a war zone. All told there were 7 of us hunting and we had 14 turkeys in the back of the truck on the way home. What a mess that was to clean.
 

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Late muzzle loader season in Ohio. My son and I are in the ground blind before light. It’s minus 8 degrees. The only sound is the little heater in the blind. Two hours later nothing. I tell him I am going to do a small drive for him. I exit the blind and go about 40 yards and see a deer bedded. I go get the kid. We stalk to a tree and he leans against it with his 45 at the shot the deer does not move. I hand him my rifle and say tip of the spear where you want to hit him. That buck never moved. About 110 yard shot. It was the biggest button buck I have ever seen 50 cent pieces for buttons. When I opened him up greenish yellow goo was everywhere and damn that thing stank!!! Fast forward to the evening we were sitting a picked cornfield a doe with fawns comes out and is feeding quartering to us. He shoots the doe then hands his rifle over his shoulder like in the scene of last of the Mohicans when they are trying to get the message out to save the fort. I slid my 50 in the sticks and start loading his gun
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. He shoots the 2nd deer. Same process gets on the third when it bolts. This was the last day I ever used my Trijicon Accupoint scope!!!! He now has them on all his rifles.
 

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I have so many and almost all include my first dog...One day many years ago when in Jr High I went pheasant hunting near my home with my 1/2 beagle 1/2 blue tick hound. She was the runt of the litter and built like a greyhound and weighed only 20#. My brother totaled out his car (other guy ran a red light) when we went to get her as a pup. My head nearly went thru the windshield and I had a nice knot on my forearm from a knob on the dash (pre-seatbelt era).

A neighbor who worked and lived in Alaska brought home a huge crazy black dog who was out of control. The owner claimed it was 1/2 wolf. He kept it chained to the barn. It would run full speed and do flips when it would run out of chain...over and over until the chain finally broke. The dog was a brute and felt no pain. He'd then patrol the neighborhood pulling a length of chain behind him. It killed a small dog while it was being walked on a leash and I saw another dog escape death by crawling under a car, pissing everywhere as wolf-dog tried to catch it.

So, this one day after school I grabbed a High Standard Supermatic 20ga and some 3", 7 1/2 shot shells (that's all I had) and went out to a favorite field. All was well until all of a sudden I noticed my dog acting strangely in front of me. She laid on her back with her feet in the air. To my left I see wolf-dog running full speed, locked in on my dog like a lion after a warthog. It hit my dog full speed, grabbed her by the neck and shook her, growling like a demon, while my dog screamed and squealed. It all happened so fast. The 20 ga came up quickly. It was a full broadside shot, modified choke. The kill was quick (not even a quiver) and my dog lived to hunt many more days.

Belle was quite a dog. Many, many, many, many memorable stories. She hunted anything and everything, fox, cat, turkey, quail, partridge, raccoon, possum, weasel (once), cottontails, duck, geese, hares, pheasant, snakes, and mice. She was really good at catching mice....if you lifted a board and there were 5-6 mice under it she would catch and eat them in just a few seconds...and rabbits...one day she caught 6 rabbits by herself. She was fast.
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My wife had mentioned to her boss that I was off work to deer hunt. Her intrigued boss mentioned he would like to go deer hunting. I typically hunt alone anyway so I said I would take him. It was bow season 2 weeks before gun season here in Indiana and I had gotten really good at calling in bucks with a grunt call. So we packed up one afternoon about 3 pm and headed to the woods. I said there’s a thicket on the edge of a swamp here. We will just pop in behind this deadfall here on the ground and I’ll clear a couple shooting lanes. So I got about 3 lanes cleared and he sat down behind me against a tree behind the deadfall and I stayed standing. I let the noise settle for about 15min. It’s close to 4pm now and I pop the first grunt. I let out a series of short tending grunts.....then silent......I hear something in the swamp ever so light. I whisper down at Rick “ You hear that? That’s a buck just stood up from his bed” Rock looks at me and starts shaking his head and laughing like I have him on a snipe hunt. I smile at him because I know he don’t believe me. I let out another series of tending grunts....then silence.....very light noises of movement in the thick Kane swamp..... I said to Rick “Hes getting closer” of course then comes the smile and smirk as if I’m feeding him a line. This time I know the buck is less than 30yds to my west in the swamp. I pop about 4 short grunts in a motion towards the buck to away.....pause....about this time the buck pops out of the thickest part of the thicket at 10yds.....almost at a trot....through the first lane he got before I could even get the bow back.....He stopped before he got the second about 8yds away.... hair standing up like a mane on his back ready for a fight. I glance down at Rick and he is frozen against the side of the tree...ghost white and not breathing.....the buck took a step, I drew the bow.....he took another 3 quick steps almost past the shooting lane...and I released the arrow....Thump! The buck scrambled and was gone, finally I could breathe.... I look down at Rick and he has started breathing again as well.... we sat there and talked about how exciting that was. He said he was hooked, never knew how that would get his blood pumping. We talked for a min, gave the buck time to lay down...... I told Rick to get up and let’s go see where I hit him......Rick said “Where you hit him?” He said “Your arrow is stuck right there in the sapling 3ft in front of you.!” So the buck actually did get through the lane and I had faded with him in the peep sight and didn’t see the tree in the peep sight when I turned it loose. I left the arrow there just for remembering and a conversation Piece when someone else finds it and wonders how it got there. I have a few stories like that. That’s how we learn, and memories we will never forget.
 
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