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How to properly close a Perazzi?

  • Push the lever and close?

    Votes: 21 28.4%
  • Just gently close the gun?

    Votes: 53 71.6%
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ok guys long time looker new Perazzi owners.

I have heard it both ways and I am now doing a poll to see what the exceptable or proper way to close a Perazzi is?

I have a TMX just redone by Chris Vendel and reblued By Danny(at Giacomos) and just aquired a nice MX15 and the wife got a very nice TM1....



IF anyone has it straight from Giacomo or Danny those will have it in higher position on my list.


Thanks

Jerry
 

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Jerry, I got my information off this forum so I guess I'm pretty low on your position list.:)

I just close the action being as gentle as possible.
 

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Daniele Perazzi used to tell people when asked about this, to just to close it. Don't slam it but if it's closed all the way the lever will not move when fired. If it does move left on firing it wasn't closed completely causing even more wear. I have the utmost respect for the man who designed the gun and his opinion. I do this for all break open shotguns just like nearly all Olympic shooters do.
 

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When you just close the gun, the top lever spring seats the locking block complete and as far as the spring tension will drive it every time. If you retard this, and thumb the top lever, the locking block may not go in as far as possible every time, which means the gun is actually closing to varying degrees instead of completely every time, which will increase wear and tear on the gun.

The metal to metal contact, friction, wear, ect is EXACTLY the same either way, so why add extra time and effort to your process?
 

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DecalDude
I got my Perazzi from Giacomo. Hold the top lever, close the gun, then release the top lever. Gun is closed, locked and ready to fire. Just closing it wears the locking bolt faster...don't panic...it's replaceable by a gun smith. Hope this helps
Gavin
 

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Dan and Giacomo both told me to hold the lever to the right with my thumb, close the gun and then release the lever. Dan told me, at the Southern Grand a couple or three years ago, that he can walk down the line, watch shooters with Perazzis close their guns and figure which ones will need a new locking block.

Bob
 

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As Skket_Man said close the gun so the lever (snaps) to center allowing the locking bolt to properly seat itself just as you would when closing a car door. Holding the lever and pushing to center it or retarding in some fashion does not allow for proper seating the bolt. There is a designed reason why the lever spring has certain tension. Just close the gun so you hear the lever snap closed.

Surfer
 

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Hold the lever open and close without slamming it shut prevents wear and tear. That would be my advice in my 45 plus years of shooting.

Roger Smith
 

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If thumbing the lever can cause variable lock-up, couldn't it then also cause variable point of impact? o_O Just teasing.

Bob Falfa
 

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How many lever thumbers hold the bolt handle back and guide it forward on an autoloader shotgun or hold the slide back and guide it forward on an autoloading pistol? Makes about as much sense there.

If you're positive you're seating the locking lug thumbing the lever as well as you would just closing the gun, guess what, you put as much force/friction/wear on the locking lug as just closing it would have, you just did it at a slower rate, which in no way lessens wear.

Take a block of steel and put it on a piece of sandpaper. Rub it back and forth 100 times really fast. Now, with exactly the same force, rub that block of steel back and forth really slowly. Guess what...the material removed both times was exactly the same. Wear is a result of force and friction, not speed.
 

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Hold the lever open and close without slamming it shut prevents wear and tear. That would be my advice in my 45 plus years of shooting.

Roger Smith
Exactly as I do.

Red Dot1 and I were taught the same I imagine when Perazzis first came into this country.

How many lever thumbers hold the bolt handle back and guide it forward on an autoloader shotgun or hold the slide back and guide it forward on an autoloading pistol? Makes about as much sense there.

If you're positive you're seating the locking lug thumbing the lever as well as you would just closing the gun, guess what, you put as much force/friction/wear on the locking lug as just closing it would have, you just did it at a slower rate, which in no way lessens wear.

Take a block of steel and put it on a piece of sandpaper. Rub it back and forth 100 times really fast. Now, with exactly the same force, rub that block of steel back and forth really slowly. Guess what...the material removed both times was exactly the same. Wear is a result of force and friction, not speed.
Yes I do guide the bolt on both Berettas and 1100's. I like wheel guns and even though there's 3 or 4 semi auto pistols around, I really don't shoot them much.
 

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Close the gun with enough to engage the bolt. You mess around and hold it, put it up and see it might not look right to you, then you bring it down and do it again. Think about shooting the target. You spend good money on a good gun and it will last. After x amount of years of shooting, have it checked and get fixed what needs fixed. Nothing last forever but your Perazzi will give many years of service. Springs and normal wear is just that, normal. Springs weaken. I still have my original TM1 Spl along with others and still give me enjoyment.
When you need a new bolt, replace it. No extra wear to let the gun close on its own. It's made to do that.
I wonder about people and their cars. Do you baby them or have fun driving them. When they need tires and brakes, change em!
Want to talk about V Springs now?
Dan
I used to sell them. I know Perazzi owners. Just shoot and enjoy them, best guns out there. (I'll hear it now)
 

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It's hard to believe here we are in the 21st century and Perazzi's metallurgy hasn't kept up with todays standards. The ritual thumbing of the lever to close the gun, ribs that break too often , trigger springs that go
south at the wrong time. All the filing and soldering when in the shop to keep them working and their initial cost.

To all Perazzi devotee's~~I admire your faithfulness to this" once" fine Italian masterpiece.


Eddie
 

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What is the name of that spring ?
I think is call "Top lever RETURN spring" (Perazzi parts number 121).

Why you want to hold off its return?

Have you thought about your engine oil all dripped to the bottom pan while sitting there? Should we put a pump to get the oil up to the top before we start the cold engine to prevent wear?
Great thinking, someone did invent such a devise 30 years ago, but why don't you see it in your car?
NO NEED!

Life is short enough for most of us, don't create another worry to shorten your life.
 

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I have been told both ways but I still hold the lever over and close. Seems to me that when you close the gun the top of the locking block is partially rounded and so is the block on the back of the barrels ever so slightly but right before the locking block engages into the groove you have two squared pieces that "snap" as it extends in. Those two squared points seem to me as the place where you could get some more wear but holding the lever over and releasing would avoid that wear. Although keeping things lubricated to help reduce friction should help too. My thoughts, I am sure someone can teach me something new and I am willing to learn
 

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I have been told both ways but I still hold the lever over and close. Seems to me that when you close the gun the top of the locking block is partially rounded and so is the block on the back of the barrels ever so slightly but right before the locking block engages into the groove you have two squared pieces that "snap" as it extends in. Those two squared points seem to me as the place where you could get some more wear but holding the lever over and releasing would avoid that wear. Although keeping things lubricated to help reduce friction should help too. My thoughts, I am sure someone can teach me something new and I am willing to learn
Something is wrong with your gun if it is driving the locking block into the barrels as it closes, sounds like it is tripping the release too early. Might want to get that looked at...
 
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