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I've watched a bunch of youtube videos and done research, but figured I'd pose the question here since it seems like some of the most knowledgeable people around concerning all things shotgun frequent this forum. Last night I disassembled my 870 wingmaster for the first time and did a very light cleaning and wipe down of the parts. I put a small amount of hoppes oil on the slide rails and on the exterior of metal parts of the gun. This weekend I'm stoping at Cabelas and looking for a cleaning kit and wanted to know what chemicals I should get? It sounds like the main thing is a solvent for powder residue and an oil to lubricate and/or protect certain metal surfaces of the gun. Also, should I buy a barrel snake or a barrel brush? Thanks for any tips you can give me. Oh, and one last thing, what do you use on the trigger assembly, and how often should I clean it?
 

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When cleaning my Semi auto and O/U, I spray down with G96 and let it sit a little bit. Then run a brass brush through the barrel a couple times. Wipe off everything with a clean rag and then run a bore snake through the barrel a couple times until everything looks perfectly clean. Then I oil and grease metal to metal surfaces and moving parts.
 

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Hoppes powder solvent will work fine, as will a number of other powder solvents. I suggest that you avoid any of the more aggressive bore cleaners that are primarily intended for removing copper fouling from rifle bores. They contain chemicals that if left too long in your shotgun barrel may cause corrosion. After cleaning with the Hoppes solvent, run two or three dry patches through the bore and then one lightly damp with Hoppes oil, or an equivalent. I prefer to use a cleaning rod but many find the bore snake handy. My only objection to the snake is the difficulty cleaning it. -Ed
 

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Using a bore snake right after you finish shooting while the barrel is still warm will remove most all of the plastic and powder residue. This will make your final cleaning at home much faster and easier. I spray a good solvent into the bore and use a cleaning rod chucked into a drill with a brass brush attached to scrub the bore. This really gets the job done much faster. HINT. If cleaning a 12 ga bore use a 10 ga brush. Run patches thru the bore until they come out clean then run a patch thru with a light coat of oil.
One other thing I found was that "Bounty Select a Size" paper towels work really good for cleaning the bore instead of cloth patches. Tear off one section fold it in half, then diagonally, pull one corner of paper towel into the slotted end of your cleaning rod. Pull the paper towel back along the rod and push into the bore. Works great.
Ray
 

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Using a bore snake right after you finish shooting while the barrel is still warm will remove most all of the plastic and powder residue. This will make your final cleaning at home much faster and easier. I spray a good solvent into the bore and use a cleaning rod chucked into a drill with a brass brush attached to scrub the bore. This really gets the job done much faster. HINT. If cleaning a 12 ga bore use a 10 ga brush. Run patches thru the bore until they come out clean then run a patch thru with a light coat of oil.
One other thing I found was that "Bounty Select a Size" paper towels work really good for cleaning the bore instead of cloth patches. Tear off one section fold it in half, then diagonally, pull one corner of paper towel into the slotted end of your cleaning rod. Pull the paper towel back along the rod and push into the bore. Works great.
Ray
I've been using the paper towels like ray said 1/2 towel per barrel. works great.
jack mc
 

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Don't waste your money on the name brand solvents. Go to Walmart and buy a jug of Mineral Spirits. You can buy a whole gallon for about $12. It will clean the gun up nicely and won't harm the wood if you should get a little on it. Then spray everything lightly with Rem Oil. I also agree that paper towels work great. I use to spend a lot of money on all the different gimmick cleaners. You can do just as good of a job with simple things like named above.
 

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One other thing I found was that "Bounty Select a Size" paper towels work really good for cleaning the bore instead of cloth patches. Tear off one section fold it in half, then diagonally, pull one corner of paper towel into the slotted end of your cleaning rod. Pull the paper towel back along the rod and push into the bore. Works great.
Ray
I use the cheapest paper towel you can find in the Cheapest store. Bounty contains hand lotion and softeners. The CHEAP paper towels are just paper and find they clean better. Just my opinion.
I also like to use the proper gauge brush by putting a wet patch over the top of it before pushing it down the barrel. This holds it firmly against the barrel walls and scrubs it well.
 

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Be careful with solvents and scrubbers, they remove all the lubrcates! You need
To make sure you get oil back into the hard
To get places. Phillip of Phillps gunsmithing likes to use kerosene as a solvent as it leaves a film of lubricant, when I use a heavy scrubber I then soak the parts in kerosene, wipe it down, blow it out and then oil. My 2 cents
 

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Hoppes 9 solvent, cleaning rod, cut up paper towels or patches, a glass eye dropper ( from CVS ) and a brass tip for the rod called a "Jag" . Put the paper towel into the chamber to form a slight cup. Fill the eye dropper with Hoppes and use it to saturate the towel while in the chamber. Then use the jag to run the wet towel up and down in the barrel a few times. Then let the barrel sit for about 15 minutes. Repeat process with clean towel on jag. Use hoppes oil applied same way if storing gun for awhile. For trigger group, about once per year I use an aerosol called "Remington Shotgun Cleaner" to blow the surfaces clean. I wipe up whatever guck remains with qtips. Then a light very light spray of Remoil or CLP on the trigger group wiping off any excess.
 

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I use Hoppes #9 mixed 50/50 with Marvel's Mystery Oil. Saturate the bore and let it sit for an hour. Next clean the bore with a bronze brush. The first time I used this concoction on my BT-99+ which is ported I couldn't believe the softened strings of plastic from the wads that were coming out of the barrel.
 

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Big-C,
Excellent tip. What you used, how you used it, and the results that matter.
I'm going to give this a try.
Just hope it doesn't change the fragrance of the Hoppes Perfume. 1straightshot is right about Hoppes perfume.
I feel the same way about Gun Sheath.
Trying to do my best Tim Allen grunt :)
George
 

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I shoot a Ithaca M37 Trap. I believe in using what works and can be found easily anywhere I might be (in the U.S.). I use WD-40 to clean the bore and choke (softs the plastic), mineral spirits for the internals and 3N1 oil to lube (8 drops on the internals and a light wipe down of the external blueing). Paper towels work great for running through the barrel (I push mine through with a Ticco rod) but get chewed up and leave fuzzy bits wiping out the internals in the receiver (bottom feed and eject) so I usually stick with 2"X2" patches. After 500 rounds, it takes 6 patches to clean my shotgun. Two through the barrel, 3 to clean out the receiver and 1 to wipe down the blueing. Occasionally I hit the throat of the barrel and choke with a bronze brush on a pistol length cleaning rod before running a patch with the Ticco.
 

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I cut Shooter's Choice with about 30% Kroil and then chuck a cleaning rod in a cordless drill to clean the bore, and then patch it dry.

Wipe down the metal with the same solution on a wet patch. Kroil is a hundred year old penetrating oil you can buy many places. It's a carry over from shooting benchrest, and it's a good mix.

Last thing I do is use a Honda cleaner/wax spray (for motorcycles, actually) to spiffy up the wood. Does a good job of removing the sweat and oils from the finish. I wouldn't do this on an oil finish, but on a varnished or lacquered finish, it works great.

Hoppe's Number 9 is a terrific cologne.
 
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