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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve searched and cannot find a good match on this topic. I’m new to Krieghoff ownership (K-80) and finding general cleaning inside the torn down receiver can be more of a challenge than any of my other O/Us.

I’m curious if any of you have any tricks of the trade. Are there better tools than the pick I’m using (basic plastic gunsmith picks)? I usually put a little bore cleaner on wipes to help. I’m also using several long swabs.

Interested in other thoughts.


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I'm not familiar with the internals of a K-80 but I learned this from my MX-8 while also using the break cleaner method to wash the receiver internals. MX Perrazis have a cocking bar, not cocking rod(s). This is a single dove tailed bar and the machined slot in the receiver provides for very tight tolerances. My gun started tightening up when closing it after reassembly and I hadn't realized I had washed all lubricant out from the dove tailed surfaces. I learned a valuable lesson. I now annually completely empty my receiver of parts for cleaning/lube as it is quite easy with the removable trigger group.
 

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I was told from a Krieghoff gun smith that you don't want to wash the grease out of the internals. Basically in his words....these things love lots of grease on the internals. He recommended not doing much in the "internals" unless something breaks.

I use gun medic....I spray down the breach area to remove powder fouling and wipe out the excess cleaner then wipe the remaining areas with a synthetic cloth covered in Rem oil and put the my K-80 back in the safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I use gun medic....I spray down the breach area to remove powder fouling and wipe out the excess cleaner then wipe the remaining areas with a synthetic cloth covered in Rem oil and put the my K-80 back in the safe.
Silly question, but after you spray a solvent style in there so you sit it upright to allow the residue to run away from the internals or wipe it all down right away? All the crevices in these bad boys can be frustrating to get clean. I’m not complaining as I love shooting it, but wowza.


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I simply wipe it out. I don't try to do a major clean after each outing..... as I shoot it way to much. I probably break clays 2 or 3 days a week. As stated, I spray the breach area with gun medic and wipe it down and run a bore snake down the Briley Tubes and put her away in the safe until our next date.
 

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What the people in post 2, 3 & 4 said is good advise . Krieghoffs have a lot of internal parts and some are easy to dislodge. Once you spray it with any kind of good cleaner/solvent , let it sit for a while then clean it with larger cleaning pads ( cut up T-shirts work great for me ) ,blow the rest out so it is dry. If you don't have an airhose ,get a can of spray that's used for keyboard cleaning .Get some oil on the moving parts ,not much is needed . Before you put the stock back on assemble the gun and dry fire it . If everything works ,your good to go with the stock .>> Repeat in 6 to 12 month
 

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Spraying the inside down with cleaner will certainly get the visible dirt, grease oil, etc. out, but can also remove grease that you can't put back in without taking things apart - areas like the hammer springs/guide rods, the firing pins and springs and top latch. So, if you go that route, use the cleaner sparingly.

During the shooting season, (if it gets dirty or wet) I lightly spray the inside of mine with Qmaxx and then lightly blow it out. Then I put a little grease on the backs of the sears where the selector hits as well as the sear/hammer engagement. It gets rid of the dirt, but not the lube.
 

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Soak it in mineral spirits that’s what Ki use
Yes.
Never use Brake Cleaner, it's too harsh.
Get a relative large parts scrubber brush (sold at NAPA and other auto parts dealers)
Use mineral spirits, then compressed air
Use oil, like rem oil, then light compressed air
Then regrease (suggest having someone show you grease points)
 

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I use a high quality grease, slip2000. Apply it in a syringe, so to get it where it’s needed and only where it’s needed. That grease stays in place amazingly.

mine hasn’t been very dirty, but I do wipe down the surfaces that can be easily reached if they appear dirty and then apply the grease.

I don’t put grease on the firing pins though, just a light oil. I have found that a greased firing pin can become gummy and the clearances are very tight. It can be so gummed up that the firing pin stays protruded From the breech face after firing.
 

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One of the K manuals directives, " if shot in the rain, wipe it down, let it dry overnight BEFORE applying a light coat of gun oil". I know I am not a metallurgy expert, however, I've never let my gun go overnight after rain without oil, and unless I see compelling evidence to the contrary, that's not going to happen. I do dry, spray with break cleaner, and lubricate before Mr. P goes to bed in a dry Negrini case.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
One of the K manuals directives, " if shot in the rain, wipe it down, let it dry overnight BEFORE applying a light coat of gun oil". I know I am not a metallurgy expert, however, I've never let my gun go overnight after rain without oil, and unless I see compelling evidence to the contrary, that's not going to happen. I do dry, spray with break cleaner, and lubricate before Mr. P goes to bed in a dry Negrini case.
Yeah I think I’m with you on not letting it sit overnight waiting for it!
 

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I think more detail about shotgun fit and "pointing vs aiming" would be helpful to those new to scattergats.

When the OP says "buy a shotgun that feels good", it's actually more than that. It is really about buying a shotgun that "fits" you -- specifically, is your eye aligned with the barrel when you shoulder the gun. Your eye acts as the rear "sight" of the gun. It should be perfectly aligned atop the barrel and in a straight line to the front bead. Much like if you look at the sights of a rifle or pistol the front and rear sight are perfect aligned along the axis of the barrel.

I have shouldered shotguns that feel great, but my eye is not aligned well (off to the left). Others where my eye is correctly centered but either too high (see too much of the top rib) or too low (receiver blocking me from seeing the front bead).

Here are a couple of tricks to use to see if the gun fits.

If the gun has a mid bead this will make things easier. Ideally you want the mid bead to be aligned with the front bead. Either overlapping (gun will shoot flatter) or in a figure-8 scenario where the front bead is slightly higher than the mid-bead forming a figure 8 (gun will shoot slightly higher).

Now, close your eyes and mount the gun. Open your eyes. Are the front and mid beads aligned without the need for you to adjust your shoulders/head? If yes then the gun "fits", if no then adjustments may be needed to fit the gun.

If the gun does not have a mid bead then there is another trick you can do -- take a drinking straw and tape it to the front of the barrel so that one end of the straw meets the front bead.

Again, close your eyes and mount the gun. Now open your eyes -- can you see the front bead? If yes then the gun fits. If no, and you see the side of the straw then the gun needs adjustment to fit. The idea behind the straw trick is that unless your eye is aligned to the center of the barrel the straw will block out the view of the front sight.

Now if you find that the gun needs minor adjustments then some of the guns on the OP list will be easier to adjust then others. If you are spending coin on a higher end shotgun, then I would go with one with an adjustable comb. There is a cutout in the stock that you can adjust for height as well as left and right. This method is the most versatile and should account for the majority of adjustments needed unless you have an unusually strange body or face shape.

Alternatively some of the major manufacturers come with shims which allow you make minimal adjustments by placing plastic spacers between the receiver and the stock. Beretta autos come with a full shim set that allow you to adjust degree of angle (how much the stock tilts down) as well as left and right bend (called cast on or cast off in shotgunning terms).

So when shot-gunners say "buy a gun that fits you" they really mean that. Not just that it "feels good" but one where your eye is correctly aligned on the barrel.
 
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