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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Read this.
"When assembling the gun, place a thin coating of Krieghoff Gun Glide or other high quality gun grease in the barrel pivots. Use only acid- and resign-free detergents for cleaning! Place a very light coat on the flat surfaces adjacent to the pivots; on the barrel lug; on the barrel flats where they are engaged by the top latch; and on the concave portion of the forend iron where it joins the receiver. Immediately after shooting and before casing the gun, its external metal surfaces should be wiped down and lightly oiled. The bore and action of the gun should be thoroughly cleaned periodically. After disassembling the gun, wipe these surfaces to remove the grease and any grit that may have accumulated during shooting. The barrels must be cleaned after shooting to remove lead fouling and the build up of plastic from wads. Use a conventional bore solvent and follow the manufacturer’s instructions, saturating cleaning patches with the solvent and running them through the bore with a shotgun cleaning rod. For particularly stubborn fouling, apply more solvent and use a phosphor bronze cleaning brush."
https://www.krieghoff.de/fileadmin/...sanleitung/PDF/instruction_manual_k80_k20.pdf
Bill
 

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clean the external lubes... yes

relieve the main springs... pointless (do you relieve the compression on your car's valve springs every time you turn it off?)
as long as a spring is not stressed beyond its design limits, no harm will come to it if it's stored under tension/compression
 

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clean the external lubes... yes

relieve the main springs... pointless (do you relieve the compression on your car's valve springs every time you turn it off?)
as long as a spring is not stressed beyond its design limits, no harm will come to it if it's stored under tension/compression
I thought the same thing, said so in a different thread, but ...conventional wisdom being what it is, etc. we are still told to relieve tension on springs because
"they may take on a set".

IMO any spring that does that is marginal for its application - - better make that ENTIRELY UNSUITABLE ! :D
 

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We do things because we can, not necessarily we need to.
 

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Better safe than sorry......it's best to disassemble clean the bore, remove the used grease, lube, apply fresh grease before leaving each station because if these 15,000$ pieces of iron, wood and whatever other exotic material used are not treated with the utmost care and maintenance they will seize up a a moment's notice.
 

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Better safe than sorry......it's best to disassemble clean the bore, remove the used grease, lube, apply fresh grease before leaving each station because if these 15,000$ pieces of iron, wood and whatever other exotic material used are not treated with the utmost care and maintenance they will seize up a a moment's notice.
Ubsurdity in search of ridicule is still absurdity.

Massive fail.
 

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Thoughts:

I talked about the "spring" thing with a friend of mine who is smarter than me, which means he's really damn smart.

We came to the conclusion:

If you store your gun for 20 or 30 years, then yeah, that spring will probably take a set.

Even if you do release the tension and you store your gun for 20 or 30 years, it'll still take a set because even after you drop the hammer, the spring is still under tension.

If you use your gun regularly, you know, like for trap shooting, the action of releasing the hammer to fire the gun is WAAAAY more likely to wear out the spring than leaving it for a week or two, or even over the winter months in a cocked condition.

So, actually dropping the hammer on a snap cap is probably counter-productive. That is, it actually causes more war and tear on your hammer spring than not doing it.

If you're worried about the condition of your hammer springs, replace them after every shooting season.

You may or may not believe this, and that's your choice. But it doesn't make it any less true...

Snap cap manufacturers love you guys!

(think about the valve springs in your car's engine. They get cycled thousands of times a minute and get "stored" under tension, and they have to deal with a lot more heat than the spring in your gun...and look how long they last without wearing out.)
 

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Barry, Perazzi springs don't last long enough to even worry about it. :anim_rofl2:
But the great thing about the "P" guns are you can change that spring in 2 minutes. On a "K" gun you have to find a gunsmith of which at a small shoot there arn't any. So that case you need a back up gun or a second receiver.
 

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Vehicle valve springs are an example of springs that ARE appropriate for their application.
Not much over 100 years of "development".
I may still have some shop manuals (Austin, Volvo, MG, Jaguar, Ford) from the 60s that detail the limits for engine valve springs that have compressed and shouldn't be returned to service.
I don't pull heads off to "de-coke" them any longer and I don't think many owners do :D
It is probably still done in race engines, but for regular commuter vehicles 20+ years isn't a problem.

Guns have been in production a lot longer, although not in such volume and apparently not to a clientele that expects (doesn't demand ?) a low level of maintenance.
I can imagine some reasons for the reluctance of gun makers to use springs that wouldn't have such problems, but I won't speculate here.

Well, a little speculation; It may be impractical within the traditional design envelope of the action - and changing THAT might be way too radical for the majority of the perceived market.
 

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Funny thing, we have this debate once or twice a month, but the advice given is right there in your gun's owner manual. Some say to clean and release tension when stored. Storage length period is not mentioned, so it could be a week, could be year. Some manuals may not address the issue at all. Why not just follow your owner's manual and not worry about it?
 

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I'll leave the springs issue alone (for now).

Turning to the question of grease and how to put it where it needs to go, without getting it where it needs to NOT go.
I got a very small tube of grease (1 oz) with a nozzle on it and (based on my Woman's suggestion) a packet of 3 makeup brushes from Ocean State Job Lot for $2.
The eyebrow brush is very small diameter, less than 1/16 inch and it is angled toward the end.
I can deposit a very small dab of grease from the tube just about anywhere and spread it out with the eyebrow brush to become a mere film.
I can even brush the latch springs inside the forearm.
I don't mind getting my hands dirty, or greasy, but this helps to avoid getting the grease back on the gun in places where I want it to NOT be.

Not the most economical way to buy grease, but heck I'd never use a whole 50 lb tub of it on guns anyway.

PS the above mentioned Woman also volunteered some (unused) tampons for use as bore mops - - Ewwee !!!
 
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