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When I contemplate the factors associated with breaking a clay target with a shotgun it is easy to conclude that it is impossible. Still, humans can do it, over and over again, sometimes hundreds of times in a row. Nobody can break every target every time, but the fact that they can even break one is a feat of major proportion.

Every element must come into play precisely and at the exact moment. Shooting too soon or too late, even by portions of a second, will cause the shot to fly off into the background. Fitting the gun to the body consists of almost too many variables. Yet, we do it. The eyes must locate and lock onto a moving target in a fraction of a second and the whole body must move the iron and wood to a place where the finger will pull the trigger and the shot cloud will move to intersect the flying target. In fact, both the shoot and the target are moving independently and they must meet at exactly the correct moment. Shot moving at 1200fps traverses 40 yards in about a tenth of a second and a potion of the shot cloud approximately 10 inches across must intersect a target flung at 45 mph (about 65 fps or 21 yards per second) at exactly the same moment. All of this takes place after the shooter utters a command to "pull" and usually in the time of one full second - and even better when it's less.

I am left to marvel at how any of us are able to do what we do on any clay target shooting.

Now, can we apply the same limitless potential to solving some of the really substantial problems in the world?
 

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sure, if you stop to think those that are really good have shot countless numbers of targets,, hard work dedication and some trial and error, but we kind of expect a quick fix for everything else
 

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Larry,

You're walking in the woods with a club in your hand. You see something dart out of the bushes nearby and head for your legs. You instinctively raise your club and come down at just the right moment to crush some critters skull with your club. You first saw the movement in your peripheral vision. Doesn't seem that different to me. I think we've been selected for this. If you can't coordinate this kind of action, your genes left the pool long ago.

Call your primal self forward as you go to the line.

Grins,

Joe
 

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If your shotgun's pattern is 30" in diameter and catches up to the target at 35 yards but your aim is just 1 degree off, you will miss. The situation is actually even worse than that, but I wanted to use round numbers.

Damn, we're good.

-Gary
 

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Now try it with a pistol at 50 yards !

American Bullseye or International free Pistol with a 1.9 " diameter 10 ring

Oh , and Iron sights. regards
 

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GW22,

In addition to your one degree theory, consider a 30" barreled gun. The business end of the barrel- one degree out of position at the time the shot string leaves the barrel amounts to .535" or 17/32". Not very much room for error. Apply that info to the fact that we do not know where or what direction that the "Bird" is going to exit the traphouse, makes this game very interesting. Kinda why I keep coming back after 45 years.

Chuck
 

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... I am just soooo proud of each and every one of us. (eyes tearing)

To make conditions even more challenging, last night we had a breeze, poor light and drizzle - I am flabbergasted that my brain could compensate after the day I had on the road...

best regards all!

Jay
 

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You have about 3/4's of a second to call pull, see the target, identify it's direction, speed, and climb rate. Your Brain must now develop a vector for intersection of the swing, shot speed, target speed, and wind interference. Then ultimately tell your finger to pull or release the trigger to make all these variables happen almost simultaneously within one degree, every time, in all conditions. Over and over again, the brain makes these decisions correctly, what an amazing bio-computer.
 

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GrandpasArms:

In spite of your eloquent reasoning to the contrary breaking clay targets is relatively easy once a few skills are developed. The reason we don't all have perfect scores is that missing a few is even easier. sigh

Between now and November I'll be working to retire one of the world's substantial problems. I hope everyone else will too.

sissy
 

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Putting a projectile on a moving target has been life giving for a long time. It is remarkable nonetheless.
 

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Chuck:

The challenge keeps me interested too. But ote that my "one degree theory" is not a theory. It's simple trigonometry and, as mentioned, the situation is actually a bit worse than described.

-Gary
 
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