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Connecticut g1, 12 gauge, 30 inch
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Citori, 12 Gauge, manufactured in 1986. I've experienced FTF, especially at skeet. The second round hangs. A gunsmith replaced the springs on the trigger and the problem seemed resolved. Recently, it happened again. I shot number one and failed on number two. After pausing, I bumped the stock and fired - worked fine. That suggested that my light loads (7/8 ounce, 1250fps, 6800 psi) might not always have enough oomph to set the trigger for the second shot.

I read online that I could swap out the 12 gauge springs with ones with a lighter tension (.410 bore). The folks that sell sub-gauge tubes all seem to recommend changing the trigger to accommodate the lighter .410 load. The cost is low (about $95.00) so it doesn't seem to be a big deal.

I've talked to people at Briley and Browning and I'm confused because they each offer contradictory advice. Briley suggests adjusting the trigger - and buying their tubes. A Browning person says it needs thorough cleaning - which I had doe when the springs were changed - about 2,000 loads ago. Both want me to send the gun in.

I'm asking here in the hopes that answers will help me decide which route to go. I blew a good skeet round when that second shot failed. I'd rather not have that "on my mind" in the future.

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Depending on how the gun was lubed last time 2000 rounds might have left the inertia parts dry. I would pull the stock off and examine the parts and see what they do when inertia is applied. Given that all was fine for a long time it might just need to be re-lubed. I wouldn't send it to anyone without having some idea of what needs to be done.
 

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This recently happened to my Son while shooting Sporting Clays this winter. Took the gun in and had them give it a once over, the smith found nothing. He did say that he had experienced similar problems when a Citori is not tightly shouldered on the second shot. My Son's gun is a Citori Plus and comes stock with a recoil reducer. We stiffen up the recoil reducer and have not had a problem since. He was, and still is, shooting factory 1oz loads.

I have not heard the lighter spring solution but it does make sense. Would there be any detrimental side-effects like excessive wear on some other part if you were to go to a lighter spring?
 

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Here is a low cost solution to your problem. You can increase the weight of the inertia block by using lead tape. You can get the tape at a local hardware store. Cut two small squares and stick one on each side of the block. Make sure the block moves freely and then test fire the gun. HMB
 

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You have to make sure you are letting go of the trigger as soon as it fires. If you hold the trigger during recoil, the trigger will not set.
 

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Connecticut g1, 12 gauge, 30 inch
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the GREAT suggestions. I had once learned that a pistol would "stove pipe" if the shooter didn't grip the gun tightly. The recoil would dissipate instead of working the slide. Clearly, the same action would appear if I fail to hold the butt firmly against my shoulder. Also, it is highly likely that I failed to release the trigger.

There is ever likelihood that I am guilty of both actions. Just not paying attention to my shooting style. I'm looking forward to getting back to the field to try what I've learned.
 

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Need a little more info on the fail to fire.

Do you hear the hammer dropping on the second shot?

Does the triiger move, but does not go "click"

It's possible you are not letting go of the trigger enough after the first shot. This is a commom problem with some shooters and the Browning Citori. You finger needs to be almost completely clear of the trigger before pulling it again.

If the second hammer does "click", then check the firing pin (generally OK) or replace the hammer springs. There is not a firing pin return spring for the top bbl.

It is impossible for anyone to hold the trigger pressure during recoil....your finger WILL bounce. Ask anyone that fan-fires a true mechanical trigger.

If the inertia block is not moving during the recoil, then the loads may be too light. Yes, the trigger assy can be made to work with a spring change. When I do them here, I actuaaly replace one spring and install a second one. The second one is an additional trigger return spring. It'll help with moving your finger forward to allow the inertia block assy to slip under the second sear.

A little additional stoning ensures that things work properly.

If you do not want to tackle this yourself, I charge $65 for the conversion.

Converting to a mechanical trigger does not make anything operate faster, nor does it eliminate trapping the trigger. A small post is installed on the sear to not the inertia block off.

Doug Braker
 
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