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the question came up today ,on shooting steel shot!

a comment was made that-

"us fixed choke shooters, would have to get differant guns" - WHY?

when you see removeable choke tubes marked 'steel"-whats the differance?
 

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Steel shot is a misnomer. Most steel shot is iron.

In the case of Remington Rem-Chokes, their steel rated Full choke is made from a harder steel alloy that has been tempered.

Not every fixed full choke barrel has a problem with steel shot. Especially modern steel shot, which loads use a thicker wad for more shot cushioning.

Steel shot still can cause some minor cosmetic marks in the bore. This is caused when a piece of steel shot gets pushed into the slit between petals of the wad. I can understand someone with a very expensive trap gun not wanting cosmetic marks in their bore.

Steel shot also tends to pattern tighter than lead shot. This is because steel shot does not compress and distort like lead. Frankly I'm surprised that more trapshooters have not exploited this aspect of steel shot. Old habits die hard.

We've seen posts here over the years from a few trapshooters who were forced to use steel shot at their local clubs, and they've stated it hasn't been that big of a deal, other than cost. Which should come down if steel shot use goes up.

Sooner or later, once enough compromising has been done, the anti's and the greenies will be after lead shot. Steel shot is coming whether anyone wants it or not.
 

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Steel shot is harder and lighter than lead. To get steel to perform as well as lead you have to use larger pellets and push them through the barrel faster. Since steel shot doesn't deform as it travels through the choke as lead does, it can't be forced through tight chokes as easily either. Steel will eventually beat the choke or the bore out of shape. In guns with removable chokes it can lead to choke tube failure. In guns with fixed chokes and thin barrels this can be a safety concern; in guns with heavy barrels it becomes a performance issue.

Keller
 
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