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44 Magnum accident



First it was baby formula, then pet food, but now you should watch out when buying bright, shiny ammunition from China.

A guy came into the police department the other day to ask a favor. He had a S&W 629 (.44 Mag) that he wanted to dispose of after a mishap at the range.



He said there was a loud bang when he tested his new ammo (Chinese made), and the gun smacked him in the forehead, leaving a nice gash.
When the tweety birds cleared from around his head, the pictures show what he saw.


Bet he never uses Chinese made ammo again!
Looks like when the round in the chamber went off, it also set off at least two other rounds in adjacent cylinders. I would have hated to bethe one that pulled the trigger on that one! i..SMOKIT



 

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Sorry, but its a hoax (at least as far as chinese ammo is concerned). Google chinese ammo 44 mag and you'll get your answer. BTW, chinese ammo has been embargoed since the early 90s.
 

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I honestly can't see where it would matter where the ammo came from. How in the hell would one shell set off the other in a revolver wheel? Just seems odd to me. Are you/they suggesting the ammo was too hot for the gun?

Matt
 

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I have a picture of a Model 29 hanging by my reloading bench that looks much like this. My picture was taken by a friend who was on the range when the blowup occurred.
The story that finally came out was that the shooter got a great deal on some reloaded ammunition at a gun show. He didn't know what was in the cases, but it was evidently many years old, and "It worked good when Dad shot it." The shooter could feel the powder moving in the cases, so figured it was a nice light load, and bought it.
After much research and discussion with powder company reps, it was determined that the shells were probably loaded with a light load of fast powder, perhaps taking up half or less of the internal volume of the cases. After many years of being moved about and not shot, the gunpowder probably was abraded to a very fine powder, which further decreased the volume.
When the shooter loaded the amunition in the cylinder, the powder was at or below the primer flash hole, thereby exposing a larger surface area to the primer flash. This would make for a faster ignition of the total volume of powder, creating greater pressure than would be usual for the volume of powder used, causing the blowup.
 

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I'd bet the Chinese Olympic shooters use Chinese shotgun shells.
 

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This photo was on one of the reloading forums some time back - maybe a year or two back. IIRC, the rounds were reloads and it was the concensus of all that the reloader had made an error. Mike
 

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The boys up in Wisconsin where I used to go shoot black powder trap had a selection of guns that had various blowups...one was a Ruger Super Blackhawk that looked much like this one (manner of blowup), top strap and top of the top three chambers missing. Man had filled his powder measure with Bullseye instead of 2400.....and set the measure at 22 grains, the standard "maggie" load at the time.

Betcha that is what happened here.

Did have a guy blow up a Taurus 66 at our club about ten years ago...top half of cylinder went somewhere. These were factory loads, old S&Ws from the seventies.
 

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timb99- Not by my observation from watching the past bunch of World Cup and Olympic events on the ISSF site. Camera never gets too close, but they look like RC Cartridges to me.
 

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Could be Ian, but I have seen "Jialing" shells and I assumed that was what they were using.
 
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