Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I complained yesterday that the white dots on my XDS had grown dull and didn't seem useful for aiming. Someone suggested I order Trijicon sights or use Glow On paint. Both approaches require "charging" - exposure to light. What, if any, would be the benefit for a concealed firearm - and would there be a better altgernative?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
You really don't need any extra sighting devices. Those devices wastes precious time under life threatening
conditions.


Practice drawing and center massing your target with your firearm as quickly as possible,
letting go with a several rounds.
If you knock-down your target and truly stop the assault. Stop~~~

If not go, for the kill.

Eddie


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,685 Posts
as Hippie said point and shoot.. and give a try to both eyes open just like trap shooting.. you'll hit a man size target.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
624 Posts
Caution: I have Springfield XDM 5.25 for competition, and have always wanted to swap out the front sight (more narrow) but in most cases they have to be cut out on my model. Many gunsmiths will not touch one. There is a video on you tube of a guy who did it himself and of course cut into his slide a little. Your model may be different. I think I have saved some gunsmith's info that can do it. Let me know if you want me to dig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,350 Posts
I don't believe Trijicon needs light recharging. I have never kept mine in a lighted area and they are as Green as the day they came on the gun.

Which was about 20 years ago.

Might call them and find out for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,622 Posts
Self defense is pretty much close range point and shoot,.

Sure tritium sights can be useful to help acquire, But I am going to point and shoot if ever the need arises.

DGH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
I like the three dot system and disagree that sights are unnecessary when confronted with using a handgun to defend yourself when faced with a situation requiring deadly force. There are just too many variables to be able to paint every situation with such a broad brush. Sights give you a reference point that promotes accuracy (always important), even if it's only a "flash" sight picture. The greater the distance, the more important sights become. Under stress, it's easy to miss even close range and taking the time (fast) to use your sights is the better option, in my opinion. Night sights are just one tool in the toolbox and could come in handy at a time you really need them. I think you will find that most professionals that depend upon a handgun for a living prefer to have night sights rather than not.

You should need no charging time with tritium sights such as those offered by Trijicon or Meprolight, as tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, unlike other forms of glow-in-the-dark applications. A good set of tritium night sights such as Meprolight or Trijicon will run you $100-$150, generally speaking, depending on the make and model of the firearm and your retail source. You can probably find them cheaper if you want to do some research. There are other brands out there as well.

Tritium sights do fade over time but a useful lifespan of 12 years is a fairly reliable number to go by, even though most will continue to glow,albeit dimmer, after that time.

These is just my opinions from my own experience and knowledge of the subject and intended to be helpful. Other opinions may vary.

Good luck on whatever you decide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,456 Posts
I still have an old Police Dept service pistol that came with Trijicon sights from the factory in 1986. They do not need to be charged in the light. They had almost no glow by 2000 or so. I sent the slide to Trijicon and they put new capsules in and they are still great. I think it was about $55 to replace the glow capsules. They did not disturb the sight alignment on the slide at all, it still shoots to point of aim. I recommend them.


I also recommend everyone who carries a personal protection weapon at night, train with it at night. Things are a lot different outdoors, near streetlights and inside of buildings. I spent a few nights shooting in an old house in the country before tearing it down. Lots of things are different than your favorite practice range on Saturday afternoon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,284 Posts
I complained yesterday that the white dots on my XDS had grown dull and didn't seem useful for aiming. Someone suggested I order Trijicon sights or use Glow On paint. Both approaches require "charging" - exposure to light. What, if any, would be the benefit for a concealed firearm - and would there be a better altgernative?
Tritium night sights do not need "recharging" ie exposure to light like luminous paint does.

Tritium gas, an isotope of hydrogen, is contained in (usually) a sealed aluminium or borosilicate glass tube. Being radioactive, as this gas decays it gives off beta particles. These particles then strike a clear man made ruby or borosilicate glass end cap that has a phosphor coating on the inside. When a beta particle strikes the phosphor, a photon is released. Tritium has a half life of a bit over 12 years. So in 12 years half of it will be used up and illumination will be dimmer by half. This means replacement is needed about every 12 to 15 years, depending on how much light you require for the conditions you expect to be shooting under.

The night sights on my SIG/Sauer P-220 are around 25 years old, so by half-life value they are half (12 years) and then half again (another 12 years) giving 1/4 of the gas left and thus 1/4 of the original illumination. Transitioning suddenly to dim or dark light they are inadequate because your pupils are contracted. But at 3AM when your pupils are dilated they still work OK. Bottom line is they should have been replaced quite some time ago, and I plan to get around to that.

You really don't need any extra sighting devices. Those devices wastes precious time under life threatening
conditions.


Practice drawing and center massing your target with your firearm as quickly as possible,
letting go with a several rounds.
If you knock-down your target and truly stop the assault. Stop~~~

If not go, for the kill.

Eddie


I disagree with this regarding tritium night sights.

My experience is just the opposite, that tritium night sights are faster and more accurate than relying on center of mass shooting in the dark. This requires practice, but is easier and quicker for most people than instinctive center of mass shooting requires.

One big issue is you are responsible for every shot fired. That includes a miss, and the chances of that are increased in low light shooting. Tritium night sights help increase accuracy.

There is only one issue with tritium night sights that can effect SOME people. And that is getting the three dots out of alignment with each other. We all know the front dot should be between the two rear dots, but there are some people who find they are getting the front dot to the left of right of the two rear dots. There are two solutions for this. Either get a two color set, which has a color other than green for the front or rear dots, or use a only front dot and no rear dots. The front dot only option is actually common on fixed sight revolvers.

I have used tritium night sights for hunting at night, on handguns and on an 1187 shotgun. I find them to be very fast and much more accurate than trying instinctive center of mass. And believe me, an alerted coyote at night is not a slow target. It requires upmost speed and accuracy to take one down.

Now lasers, that's another can of worms. Searching for the dot can indeed slow you down. And I'm not keen on any illumination that requires batteries on a defensive gun.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,650 Posts
Pretty much all my carry pistols have a tritium site system of some sort. I prefer a bar dot system either in the old Novak type/Mepro Lite Adjustable/or the vertical bar with a tritium front. There is one Glock that I have just a tritium front on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,843 Posts
My Sig 226 has both Trijicon (white-red-white) and Crimson Trace, best of both worlds.
My Trijicon are kept in the dark 99% of the time, and they still work great in dark situations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
Some Good advice from Leo
I also recommend everyone who carries a personal protection weapon at night, train with it at night. Things are a lot different outdoors, near streetlights and inside of buildings. I spent a few nights shooting in an old house in the country before tearing it down. Lots of things are different than your favorite practice range on Saturday afternoon.


Become proficient with your carry gun. Incase a situation does not come about as you envisioned , and it but probably won't~~

Eddie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
785 Posts
Something else to keep in mind is muzzle flash and noise particularly at night in a confined area, try emptying a magazine out the passenger window from the driver seat with all the other windows up.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,600 Posts
Tritium sights are the way to go. No batteries, no charging them with light, no paint. As BIO above stated, the last for 12-15 years. I have them in all my defense pistols.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,456 Posts
Point shooting is a skill that is useful, but you have to stick with one handgun. I trained and drilled point shooting with a revolver (standard revolver with black tape over the sights)my 15 to 25 foot drills started going pretty well. Then I switched to a Beretta, and had to relearn, which was even more difficult because I had already programed muscle memory for the revolver. It took as many shots to "unlearn" as it did to learn. Throwing in a glock scrambled the process again.

I would still recommend at least experimenting and at least trying to build that skill set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,599 Posts
Scenario: You're in bed, middle of the night, and you get someone breaking into your home, or already in your home. You grab your gun, and just as you get ready to jump out of bed to investigate, the intruder is in your room. It's darker than the inside of a cow and you can't really see the intruder clearly, but realize you are going to have to shoot him to protect yourself. You bring the gun up to aim, but the sights are impossible to line up up. Problem? You bet. Now, same scenario but this time you bring your gun up to aim and the Crimson Laser dot is exactly where you want to shoot. You don't even have to think about it. Which scenario would you prefer? In addition to the laser putting the gun on the target, it also adds the fear factor to the intruder when he sees that little red dot on his chest, and the laser light illuminating from your firearm. I won't take the chance. IF I have to use my gun I want all the advantage I can get.......
 
  • Like
Reactions: GrandpasArms

·
Registered
Joined
·
746 Posts
I have never used a laser sight. Do they really throw off enough light to identify a target when it is as dark as the inside of a cow?
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top