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I overheard a gunshop conversation that a guy uses car wax on the blued surfaces of his guns to repel water, etc.. Have any of you used it? Any harm? I thought it sounded like a good idea...Randy
 

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Birchwood-Casey makes a gun wax that can be used on both wood and steel surfaces.

I've used it before and it works fine.
 

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TIP: If you want gun stock wax at a great price, buy the Johnson Floor Wax paste that comes in a can which can be purchased at Lowes. Just spray a little silicon on the Johnson wax and it matches the ingredients in the bottled Birchwood Casey Gun Stock Wax. A can of the wax costs about $7.00 and it will likely outlast you. I've used the wax on my 30 year old BT-99 and there are no cracks in the high gloss finish. Actually, I pulled off a MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) on the wax was and the Johnson Floor wax matches content except for the silicon. That's a cheap way to take care of your wood finishes but it takes a little work as it has to be applied, dried, and then buffed with a soft cloth. Darrell
 

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Avoid getting it in the checkering, though.
 

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Randy..... I have been doing it for years on all my guns, just a little differently. Several years ago a friend turned me on to this and it works perfectly. Go to the grocery store and buy a can of SCOTTS LIQUID GOLD furniture polish. After shooting, I spray the entire gun down with it and wipe it with a terry cloth towel. Really protects the gun. It also will leave some wax residue between the wood and the metal which helps keep moisture out. Inexpensive and very effective at keeping the gun looking like new and repelling water....... Dan Thome (Trap2)
 

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Clenzoil is the best thing for protecting your guns inside and out, use car polish on your car and Pledge on your furniture ... KISS = keep it simple stupid ... No offense mean't in the last statement ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
 

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Wax and oil will keep moisture off the metal and make it shiny. I don't want my barrels reflecting a lot of light that could distract me when looking at the bird. If I put anything on my barrels, it will be when I am putting the gun in the case, not taking it out. I also fear that if I oiled the outside of my barrels before shooting, I would end up with oil on the part of my shirt that covers my belly.

Pat Ireland
 

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Pledge has worked for me for 40+ years. I only use it on the poly gloss wood finishes and all the metalwork. The small amount of lemon oil in it removes greasy hand smudges and slobber from my stocks quite nicely.
 

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IMO, the Krieghoff 'perfect' gun oil is the all around best. I have purchased used guns with very grungy/mungy/dirty/sludgy checkering. A toothbrush and some product called "Wood for Good" really worked well in cleaning a shining the wood. I found that product (non-toxic, etc., appeared to be likely an import from France or Canada) at the CVS pharmacy of all places. It made the checkered area give up all kinds of grunge (likely body oils, skin cells, dirt etc.) so that the checkering was again crisp in appearance, clean, and the grain showed again. Took about five passes with a very old and dirty gun.

The stuff also works nicely on the rest of the gun if a wax is wanted. I avoid silicone products; silicone worked poorly for me and tended, I think, to entrap moisture!

But as a general rule, the Krieghoff oil used sparingly and then wiped over the gun with a clean patch after shooting works very, very well. And no, I don't shoot a K-gun!
 

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Brownk80- Thanks for the tip. I never thought about using a rag. Do you use SAE 30 all year or when it gets cold do you change to SAE 20 or even 10?

Pat Ireland
 

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I did not read all the posts but I know a gunsmith that would clean the scope base and the reciever and put layer of floor wax between the two to keep water from getting under the base. The wax does not hurt the blueing. I have used wax to dull the blueing on a duck gun so it would not shine in the sun. I later just cleaned it off.
 
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