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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a verrry nice 1979 Citori trap gun with fixed chokes.

I bought his gun to reduce the weight out front that the Invector Plus guns have...and the gun's weight over all.
I love the XT Trap...but had to get something lighter.

Problem is that this gun has a Monte Carlo stock like most trap guns back then...and I can't get down low enough to keep the gun from shooting waay high (low cheek bone structure).

This isn't an expensive gun...although it is like new, so I don't want to spend a bunch more than the gun is worth to change or replace the stock so I can shoot it.

What is the least expensive fix... those of you who also can't shoot a high comb gun, have used with success?

It is a 2 screw long tang stock...(3 bolt forearm).

Thanks...Stan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Hello Ian..

It's a mint high Gloss stock, which should have some value if sold...and yeah, I can sand it down, and I do have a belt sander. The angle of the stock is pretty important though...and the only one I have tried before didn't fit comfortably, and it would look like ...well you know.

Maybe I could convert a field or skeet stock and put a high gloss finish on it. I have done a few gloss finishes with good results. Not sure what stock would work if I went that route though.

I failed to mention that I usually need an adjustable pad that hangs below the stock an inch or so...whatever I'm shooting , be it skeet or trap ..so considerable drop at the toe helps some time.

I have a bunch of pieces for a PFS stock but no right hand comb...or long tang grip (so there's $400 or so to make that work).

I entertained sending the stock out and have it fitted with a soft comb that is much lower...no worries about refinishing the wood to match that way. I guess that's the least expensive idea I have considered. Plus having and adjustable comb really is important a some of the time....maybe even more so on a ground down piece.

Stan
 

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Put a taller front bead on it, and if that doesn't work, add a rib to adjust POI. You could put on an adjustable comb, and cut some wood off the bottom of the comb.
 

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Have someone cut it and install 4 way adjustable comb hardware, save the original wood top and replace it with a thinner soft top comb. Good luck.
 

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Just add a rib to it. Try different out of wood then make one from nylon or paint the wood black. Cheap and easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good ideas everyone...

I've always shied away from add on ribs, so much so that it "never entered my mind"...till now. That might be just the ticket...and still maintain the beauty of this near perfect gun. A fix that could be reversed if needed down the line...and an economical experiment to boot.

Much cheaper than my thoughts for an adjustable soft comb. Hmm...

Thanks...Stan...
 

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If you REALLY want to keep this gun, I agree with hbar314. You can try it yourself with some short strips of balsa wood and double-stick tape, and a temporary bead. Start with 1/8 inch thick piece, and if that's not enough, go to 1/4 inch, and so on until you get to where you need to be.

Then contact someone like Keensights and get an add-on of that height.

Or, the other reasonable answer is to do what bossbasl said.
 

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Trying balsa wood ribs of various thicknesses is your best bet. Plastic ties work for the trials. Once you decide on a thickness, purchase 3/8" wide aluminum stock at the length and height( i.e. 1/4, 3/8, etc.) needed then use double sided auto body tape to attach the painted new rib to your existing rib (clean with alcohol wipes). Place sights as needed. This will add about 1-3 oz. of weight to your gun but it is durable and looks good.
 

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You don't mention just how much high it's shooting - or whether it's shooting ok horizontally (left or right).

If you know how far it's off in height - and where you need to be, with certainty, at your bird break distance- you can easily calculate how high of a rib you'll need, above where the front bead now sits. A rib is surely your low cost option - as the guys above noted.
 

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stan, I recently went through the same exercise. I purchashed 2 citori traps in great shape both with mc stocks(1978-1983) and both shot 8 inches high @ 13 yards. my trap guns work best for me when shooting in the 3-4 in high @13 yards. I ended up making rib protoypes with pine strips . for me an additional 1/4 inch rib hight was the magic number and gave me a 4 inch POI @ 13 yards. I then ordered a custom rib from keen sights (661-703-1865) vikki was my contact and great to work with. the rib arrived as ordered and was very easy to install , very pleased with the results and it was a fun project. I think I will try to make one out of some type of synthetic material and see how it looks when mounted. the flat black wood worked and looked ok but I don't think it would be very durable in adverse weather. have fun and good luck.
 

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It seems to me that the drop of your comb, in relationship to the rib on your gun is too high. That can occur on any stock, be it a Monte Carlo or not. If you have a friend with a gun that think fits you, you can get a straight yardstick, or a long straight edge. Place it on top of your rib, with part of that straight edge hanging above the comb. Take a measurement with a ruler, the gap that you have between the top of the comb and the bottom of the straight edge. That's called the drop at the comb.
Do this at the front of the comb and at the back of the comb, before it drops down the Monte Carlo to the recoil pad.
That's a start. Now you know what drop you need for the shape of your face, cheek bone and eye. Please note there's a lot more to fitting a stock, but it's a start.
You can also get doublesided automotive tape and piggy back layers of tape on your rib, until you feel you have the correct sight picture. Then do the steps I mentioned above, in order to see the drop you need for your stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Why not just buy a straight comb stock, then sell the Monte Carlo? You might even come out ahead. That would seem best monetary venture.

I mentioned that in post two...and what I thought would be easiest to do in the beginning.

Two things though...I haven't been able to find a long tang trap stock with a straight comb...and am not sure what I should be looking for after that... maybe a skeet or field stock. Anything would be better than a Monte Carlo for me...but Monte Carlo's seem to be the only trap stocks anyone has to sell.

Did thy not make many long tang stocks in a straight comb for trap? If so what would be the next best thing for a starting place, a field stock or skeet stock, or...?

Thanks to everyone fore the input.

Stan..
 

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Stan. Read my post. A Monte Carlo has nothing to do with it, other than perhaps you're starting out with a parallel comb, which is ideal for trap.
Check to see what drop you need on your comb, before you waste money on stocks.
The combs on most skeet and field stocks will be higher at the front of the comb and lower at the back. These stocks will most of the time slap you in the face, plus depending on how far forward or back you place your cheek on the stock, you'll end up with a different sight picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Stan. Read my post. A Monte Carlo has nothing to do with it, other than perhaps you're starting out with a parallel comb, which is ideal for trap.
Check to see what drop you need on your comb, before you waste money on stocks.
The combs on most skeet and field stocks will be higher at the front of the comb and lower at the back. These stocks will most of the time slap you in the face, plus depending on how far forward or back you place your cheek on the stock, you'll end up with a different sight picture.
Thanks for the post Andy...and I read your first post too.

To clarify. I have several guns that I have spent a considerable sum and effort on fitment..and have a tool I made out of a aluminum sheet rock square for measuring drop at the comb and heel. I've made several adjustable pad plates...cut off a couple of stocks ..and refinished several high gloss Browning wood sets (which is tough, that stuff is hard to get off and stain to match, much like automotive paint).

I spent a bunch of time on a Monte Carlo stock once before to make it fit without the face slap. I have had Gracoils with soft combs, Clyde Slides ,Bills Recoil Reducers, and many guns with factory adjustable combs...to include my last venture with a Mx-15.

I require a soft comb on most of them to work well...and a dropped recoil pad . After that ..the weight has been my biggest hindrance. Most high end guns are just too slow and heavy for me...So I decided to go back to the basics.

I used to shoot a fixed choke Browning lights out...with nothing but a Morgan Pad. That was before I even knew anything about fitment....and didn't know if the gun was Superposed or a Ciotori , I was so green back then (1984) . Sold the gun for something fancier ..and have regretted it always... So, I'm going back to my roots for this experiment...without just throwing cash at it. It worked way back then...maybe it will again.

The balance of this gun is like a pair of old shoes...neat and trim with a great sight picture...weight is 8 lbs 14 oz. and patterns are awesome.

Regarding stocks.. if any one has a field or skeet stock or a plain trap stock...maybe that's what I need...and why I'm looking for input for those that have tried the slightly unusual with good results. Parallel stocks don't work well for me usually...

I have a 4 barrel skeet set with screw in chokes that I shoot better than any dedicated trap gun I have owned. I shoot Skeet, Trap and Sporting clays with it. For trap I shoot the skeet 12 gauge for doubles and I have a 34" adjustable rib unsingle fitted to the set for handicap.

I keep thinking I need a dedicated Trap gun for handicap improvement...but that hasn't proved to right so far. (and not for lack of effort and $$$ spent)

One of my main concerns is too much wear on my receiver. I shot 70,000 targets last year...and consider this gun irreplaceable. I really am trying to put something together that will take some of the pressure off the one receiver.

Weight seems to be the key factor...aside from fitment of course. Hence the experiment with this simple fixed choke gun, plus it feels sooo good!

Thanks...Stan
 

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If you build a stock (without an adjustable butt plate) with the configuration you just explained, your stock will look just like a Monte Carlo with over 2" drop at the heel.
This stock has 1.5" drop at the comb, with 3" drop at the heel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Andy....I didn't explain a configuration, so we're evidently not on the same page....although I do appreciate your input.

I need the drop at the comb at least 1/4 inch less than this particular Monte Carlo stock is in stock form...maybe a little more.

I mention the other things so you know that I understand exactly what you are talking about...and how to go about measuring the stock.

I do not own a gun that didn't have to be fitted...been down this road many times.

Just looking for a different way to skin the cat....and stay closer to the basic simplicity of this old/er gun.

Thanks...Stan
 
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