Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My dad is 78 years old and is in a later stage of Alzheimer's. He can't drive anymore and easily forgets where he is and almost never knows what time of day it is. I've been trying to spend as much time with him as I can, often doing the things he enjoys. He's the one who introduced me to shooting (informally in the hills with a hand launcher and a few clays) and most of the other sports/hobbies I love. This past week we went to a small trap club when we knew it wouldn't be busy and he shot three rounds with us. He hadn't picked up his gun in about 8 years but still managed to shoot right around 20/25 each time, one round of singles and two rounds of handicap from 22yd.

On to my question. I tried to look for it in the rules but couldn't see what I was looking for. Is it possible for my dad, or anyone else with such a disease as Alzheimer's, to be able to shoot in a registered shoot if they have a person standing behind them to help them remember when it's their turn to shoot and to help with overall safety? My dad is still a decent shot and would like to shoot more, he said, and even try some registered targets at smaller shoots. Physically, he can handle that part of shooting. It's the mental reorientation he would need someone to help him with.

Here's my dad on Post 4 along side two Senior Vets who have been great to me and have helped me pick up shooting registered targets this year. Their patience with my dad on this beautiful day made for a great memory for me but, sadly, one my dad may easily forget too soon.
1714801
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
He certainly looks like a sandbagger to me ? That's the perfect stance and posture of some , who will clean your clock ! At 87 , there's not a doubt .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,566 Posts
Very tough question! Safety is the first and only consideration. If your father is advanced like you have described, I have to ask why would you like him to shoot registered? I would think the best option (and this is just my personal opinion) is that you keep his shooting to recreational when there are not a lot of people around and that all squad members are fully aware of his limitations. With his diminished mental abilities, I would think an unexpected lapse of safe gun handling could happen at any time. Maybe you could arrange to have an aide/coach standing behind him to help if anything unsafe should occur.

You are to be commended for keeping your father active.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,339 Posts
I am an old fart and I am voting against what could happen to me, but I must say that in my humble opinion, people with diminished mental capabilities should NOT be in possession of firearms much less in possession of a firearm at a range and actually shooting.

The ATA rules do NOT allow a non-shooter to be on the field while a squad is shooting. "19.Only competitors competing on a field at that time, referee/scorers or other shoot officials may be on an active trap field during a registered shoot, unless a safety or emergency concern arises."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,612 Posts
I think that trap management could figure out a way to safely let him register.
I would try it at a small shoot with you there to help quardinate things.
Just to say ( he did it)
For those of you say never bend the rules . Do you ever drive over the speed limit?
Henry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for the replies. I asked because he has attended some of my registered shoots to watch me shoot and said he wished he would have shot in a registered shoot when he had the chance. It literally would be one singles event at a smaller shoot. I do understand the concern about firearm safety however and I understand that there are other shooters out there shooting too. Alzheimer’s is an ugly disease that keeps some people who physically could still do the things they love from doing them because mentally they’re not strong anymore. Nonetheless, above all else, safety does come first. Thanks again for the replies and Happy Labor Day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,328 Posts
Such a sad situation that this problem exists. I am in the medical field and a shooter too. More than anything (except for safety) I would want him to be able to do what makes him happy. With that said I really question if "registered" is the way to go. He really needs someone directly behind him AT ALL TIMES that can grab the gun in a split second if needed to prevent a possible problem. I would think practices or even a small local club program shoot would be much more simple and might ease others minds. With that said I hope he can shoot up to his last minute if possible. God bless you and your dad!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,187 Posts
I commend you for your efforts. In my humble opinion, I think if you don't have a full squad of friends that are willing to shoot in a registered shoot knowing you and pops are there together, most others will not want to shoot in that squad. Sorry to say it but I believe it to be reality as it may be a distraction or concern to others. If you do have a full squad, as others have commented, I would talk to management and see if they would allow it. Just remember they may not answer the way you want. Also, you can always organize a "Fun" shoot for pops and friends and make a day out of it. Good luck and good shooting, Rey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,244 Posts
people with diminished mental capabilities should NOT be in possession of firearms
Yeah, I’m going with Gary on this one. My mother has fairly advanced dementia, and imagine her with a car. Shall I sit next to her while she drives “in case things go awry” ugh, NO!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Wow, I really commend and admire you for doing this for your father. I wouldn’t think registered would be a good choice, because of the restrictions. That being said if you go ahead with the idea, a big 50 might be a better choice. Back in the older days some clubs used a separate puller and scorer. If the club would go along, he could possibly shoot alone or with someone fully aware of his condition and you could could serve as puller where you could more closely observe him. (No rule I know of says a puller must remain stationary) With big 50 rules his squad members don’t even have to register as long as two others do. That’s a lot for people to agree to, but if you wish to pursue it, it might work for you.

all the best to you and your father.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I agree, a small informal non registered shoot would be the way to go and I can referee it and stand behind him and help him. The I don’t have to worry about him beating me, haha. Thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,583 Posts
I’m sorry to hear your dad has Alzheimer’s but I admire him that he still likes to shoot. Safety is everything and with that said, maybe it’s best if you shoot practice with him. You can’t be on the field during a registered shoot to help him so that’s a no go. Accidents are impossible to erase if someone gets hurt, even with the best of intentions. I wish you both the very best and enjoy your time with your dad as much as you can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
My grandfather who raised me had Alzheimer’s. I really admire what you’re trying to do for your father. I watched my grandfather as he progressed through the disease and he would get confused and frustrated at times when he couldn’t do what he thought he should or used to be able to handle. I like the suggestions of something small and simple for him to participate in rather than a large registered shoot. Best of shooting to both him and you. Please keep us informed how it’s going. You’re a good son!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
My father in law who had Alzheimer's passed in January. He won the High-power National Championship in 1953 and had a heck of a run in the shooting sports. Nothing made him more happy in the last year(s) when he lived in our house than to go to the range with me and watch from the car. If I could have gotten him shooting (his physical strength was terrible by this time) I absolutely would have done it.

Sharptail- find a small shoot, talk to the management and others on the squad, and stand behind him while he shoots. The memories you make will last the rest of YOUR days, and may even spark something in him for a little while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,508 Posts
I would gladly shoot with him if he got on my squad or even help him so you could shoot,I have a good friend who is starting to have a problem and is only 68 and has had this for a few years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Over the years we have had 4 guys with this issue, 3 have now passed.

Registered I would say no, recreational a big yes as long as you have people who can keep him on task and safe.

It is an awful thing to watch and deal with, we had a pretty good group of guys watching and guiding every move until it got unsafe.

Heartbreaking to watch when they had to give it up and sell their equipment, especially for 2 that their wives were in worse shape than them and it was their only weekly break to get away and have a little freedom/fun.

Always seems to happen to the good guys not the ones you would love to run off.
If I am lucky enough to meet the big guy I will have questions about things like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,778 Posts
There are some on the line at my club that I sure wonder about. I'm pretty sure my Grandpa had it on our last pheasant hunt, but it didn't stop him from bagging a few roosters. He couldn't remember the guy who's farm we were on, (they'd been friends for 50 years) called my Dad my uncle's name, and the only reason he remembered mine it it's the same as his. But he could tell a hen from a rooster, and when a rooster got up, he downed it.

I would be honored to shoot with your dad, sharptailhunter!
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top