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My son has one he uses for hunting.

Had to replace the first unit but it has worked flawlessly since.

He can slow the video down enough to see the wad and the shot go to the target.

I'm going to borrow it sometime and shoot trap with it.
 

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I have had one for going on two years. Works just fine. If you have specific question, ping me.
 

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I just watched the videos in your link and could not see the clay. Now go look at ShotKam videos on you tube or their website, optics are no comparison. IMO you do get what you pay for.
 

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I don't really see the point of it.
I've thought about getting one as a self help coaching tool...... from your comment, seems like I'd be heading down the wrong path
 

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I would have to agree with grizguad, video quality seems to be the downfall. I have a ShotKam and the video quality and playback works as well as advertised. I would expect it too, as it cost 2.5 times as much.
 

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I've thought about getting one as a self help coaching tool...... from your comment, seems like I'd be heading down the wrong path
You can get as technical as you like, but in the end will you be any better for it? I highly doubt it. There's no replacement for lots and lots of practice the right way.
 

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It's very difficult to self diagnose and correctly analyze what your misses are caused by. A good coach, or in absence of that a ShotKam shows the shot you thought you were in front of was instead stopping the gun because you thought you were ahead and actually shot behind. Another cam angle of the shooter's body sync'd by good software like Dartfish allows an experienced shooter to figure out what's really happening when you have to go it alone.

The correct syntax for the rule "Practice makes perfect" is actually "Perfect practice makes perfect" Practicing the same mistakes over and over just ingrains habits that become harder to break.
 

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Hey Tron, Gary Waalkes here. I cannot advocate purchasing a shot camera due to the cost. I also agree with your comment about serious practice. but many shooters cannot get their mind to give them the sight picture that existed when they hit the trigger. If a shooter can beg, or borrow, or rent one of these things, you will see exactly what your mind saw when you hit the trigger. You will know how close the bead is and how high you shoot. It is just a data point, but if you can get that data for cheap, it may have value to you.
 
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Jaburg1, Having used both platforms quite a bit over the last 2 years...using a gun cam for self help will be limiting. What I mean is; yes, you can watch the video and see a miss or hit. But you will not necessarily know why. A gun cam is not going to show bad gun fit, bad head placement or a host of other issues which can lead to a miss. Unless you are training solo and can stop after each shot an note things you felt were wrong and then go back a pair it up with the video...or have a knowledgable person critiquing you and jotting down what they see...your feed back will be limited. You will not always see the shot string/cloud in the videos...this will depend on sun angle, where the sun/light is in relation to the shot, background clutter, etc. Hint: If you shoot in a light drizzle with the right light it can make seeing the shot string easier. You can't read the breaks...and watching "X" amount of hits and misses is not really going to tell you anything at all.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
It's very difficult to self diagnose and correctly analyze what your misses are caused by. A good coach, or in absence of that a ShotKam shows the shot you thought you were in front of was instead stopping the gun because you thought you were ahead and actually shot behind. Another cam angle of the shooter's body sync'd by good software like Dartfish allows an experienced shooter to figure out what's really happening when you have to go it alone.

The correct syntax for the rule "Practice makes perfect" is actually "Perfect practice makes perfect" Practicing the same mistakes over and over just ingrains habits that become harder to break.
I cannot agree more with your syntax clarification. I've been in situations in shooting sports as well as baseball, golf and bowling where I've hit a slump and had no idea how to fix it. The result was solidifying bad techniques and making the activity miserable rather than enjoyable. The frustration that you can experience in repeating poor performance can drive you up a wall. I've always believed that you have a problem not in making mistakes, but when you do not learn from them.
 
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