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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I rarely shoot doubles & wanted something in my top barrel to keep me from accidentally dropping a shell in the wrong barrel. That thought led me to the C&H reducer. Might as well add some weight while I’m at it right?
Anyway-it came in on Saturday and sits in the barrel just as a shell normally would but I didn’t think about how easily it would come out. If I tip the gun just pass level with the action open it will slide out.
Do you all think I could wrap a loop of tape around it to get enough friction to hold it in the barrel? Or am I asking for trouble once that bottom barrel heats up? Heat shrink sleeve?
A
 

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I think the heat shrink sleeve makes sense. If not, a little plumbers tape and a slight tap to keep it in place. Good shooting, Rey
 

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Don't make the reducer fit too tightly in the chamber. Every time you open/close the gun, the reducer must still be able to easily slide in and out a distance equal to the gun's extraction height.
 

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I rarely shoot doubles & wanted something in my top barrel to keep me from accidentally dropping a shell in the wrong barrel. That thought led me to the C&H reducer. Might as well add some weight while I’m at it right?
Anyway-it came in on Saturday and sits in the barrel just as a shell normally would but I didn’t think about how easily it would come out. If I tip the gun just pass level with the action open it will slide out.
Do you all think I could wrap a loop of tape around it to get enough friction to hold it in the barrel? Or am I asking for trouble once that bottom barrel heats up? Heat shrink sleeve?
A
You will need to disengage your ejector for sure.
 

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If you Know someone with a lathe you can have them put a grove in the brass end and install a O-ring large enough to create a push in fit.
It will last for several years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’ve not done it either but it’s something I think about before every shot. I’m trying to eliminate all distractions between pulls.
 

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Like other folks have said, this item must move in and out with ejector unless you disengage the top barrel ejector. I think the thin white plumbers tape is the best option…. Makes it slightly tighter but still allows movement. I’d disengage ejector.
 

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Like other folks have said, this item must move in and out with ejector unless you disengage the top barrel ejector. I think the thin white plumbers tape is the best option…. Makes it slightly tighter but still allows movement. I’d disengage ejector.
My opinion:
There's a difference between the extraction function and the ejector function.

With break-open guns, the extraction function occurs every single time you open the gun, whether or not the chamber contains a just-fired shell, an unfired shell, a snap cap, a recoil reducer, or nothing at all. And it occurs whether or not the hammer has been dropped on that chamber. Extraction is the simple "slight lift" of the extractor to pull whatever's in the chamber a slight distance out of the chamber so you can remove it by hand. Some guns (such as Brownings) seem to lift the shell relatively little. Other guns (such as Berettas) seem to lift them a little bit more . . . just basic gun-design differences.

With "selective ejector" guns (most quality break-open guns), the ejection function is tripped only on the barrel(s) that had its hammer dropped . . . and ejection occurs at the very end of the barrel opening arc . . . long after extraction is complete.

So, disabling the ejector function won't do anything as far as extraction is concerned. Extraction will still occur every time the gun is opened, even if the ejector is disabled [good thing, otherwise you wouldn't be able to remove a shell (fired or unfired) from the chamber]. Besides, the ejector function should never be tripped anyway on the chamber holding a recoil reducer . . . it would mean the shooter pulled the trigger on a chamber containing a recoil reducer.

Side note: I remember the late versions of the old Staub Mercury Recoil Reducer had a groove with an o-ring. It was about 1-inch from the rear end of the reducer (i.e., it was positioned about 1-inch deep in the chamber when the reducer was inserted). It provided enough resistance to prevent the reducer from falling out, but it had enough "give" or "roll" to still permit the extractor to lift it every time the gun was opened. IIRC, it worked better in some guns than others. Some folks removed the o-ring if it gave trouble in their gun.
 

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I used the C&H recoil reducer in my Citori XT for a time. I wrapped a piece of mole skin around it to keep it from rattling around and the ejector could still lift it.

It worked pretty good until I had a medical issue with my eyes and had to stop shooting for awhile. I'd left it in the chamber for about four to six months and there was enough water in the mole skin to rust that hummer firmly in the barrel. I had to knock it out with a long wood dowel and a hammer. The barrel was pitted pretty bad and I was unhappy to say the least.

I sent the gun off to Allem's Gunsmithing and in lengthen the forcing cone, they saved the barrel. Good job, Allem's!
 

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For several years I used one of the C&H chamber Reducers, I just wrapped black electrical tape around the nose of it till it was a snug fit
 
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